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I was trying to see how different languages handle floating point numbers. I know that there are some inherent issues in floating point representation, which is why if you do 0.3 + 0.6 in Python, you get 0.899999 and not 0.9

However, these snippets of code simply left me astounded:

double x = 0.1,
    sum = 0;

for(int i=0; i<10; ++i) 
    sum += x;

printf("%.9lf\n",sum);
assert(sum == 1.0);

The above snippet works fine. It prints 1.0. However, the following snippet gives a runtime error:

double x = 0.1,
    sum = 0;

for(int i=0; i<10; ++i) 
    sum += x;

assert(sum == 1.0);
printf("%.9lf\n",sum);

The only change in the two snippets above is the order of the assert and printf statements. This leads me to think that printf is somehow modifying its arguments and rounding them off somehow.

Can someone please throw some light on this?

  • Try 16 digits instead of 9. – Jonathan Leffler Sep 24 '15 at 20:17
  • 8
    Please never ever ask for help on an error you are getting without bothering to state what error you are getting. This is insanity. – Jonathan Wood Sep 24 '15 at 20:17
  • This appears to be another instance of not understanding how floating point numbers work. Throw on top of that a misunderstanding of printf and you have a mess. – duffymo Sep 24 '15 at 20:18
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    because – Dmitry Ledentsov Sep 24 '15 at 20:20
  • printf is a C function. C functions receive their parameters by value, not by reference, so they can't modify them (except for arrays, which are converted to pointers when passed to functions). – Barmar Sep 24 '15 at 20:23
6

Some processors, such as x86, have floating point registers that are higher precision than the data type (80 bit, compared to 64 bit for a double). Calling printf() causes these registers to be stored on the stack, where there is only 64 bits allocated for the variable. This causes the difference you are observing.

For more information see What every computer scientist should know about floating-point arithmetic.

  • How does "calling print() causes these registers to be stored on the stack"? They are passed on the stack to printf(), but how does that alter the original variable sum? – Jonathan Wood Sep 24 '15 at 23:16
  • Without a call to printf() (or any other function) it is possible that the variables are stored in registers. If thre is a function call, the variables will have to be saved on the stack, because the compiler cannot guarantee that the function being called will not use those registers for something else. – Joseph Stine Sep 25 '15 at 0:13
  • I see what you're saying. Interesting if that is what is causing this. – Jonathan Wood Sep 25 '15 at 0:35
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printf() does not modify its parameters.

I can't imagine asking help for an error and not stating what error you are getting. Do you mean it asserts. Are you sure that both don't assert, but you only see the one that asserts before the printf() for some reason?

  • I'm not sure I understand your question. The first code snippet does not give me a runtime error but the second one does. I don't understand why this is so. – Akshay Damle Sep 24 '15 at 22:47

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