6

In the example below, is there a way for a method of the implementing class to explicitly tell the compiler which interface member it implements? I know it's possible to resolve ambiguity between interfaces, but here it is within one interface.

interface IFoo<A,B>
{
    void Bar(A a);
    void Bar(B b);
}

class Foo : IFoo<string, string>
{
    public void Bar(string a) { }
    public void Bar(string b) { }  // ambiguous signature
}
  • 1
    You're misunderstanding interfaces. You only need public void Bar(string a) { }. You are implementing the contract of the interface, not method definitions themselves. There is no difference between the two Bar definitions when A=B to an outside caller. They are one and the same. – Rob Sep 25 '15 at 3:55
  • I dont think you can solve that since that has no sence if you dont use generics, write that without generics and see what happens, maybe it helps you to understand why is not possible – bto.rdz Sep 25 '15 at 3:56
  • To explain further, your interface says "Anyone who implements me shall implement Bar(A) and Bar(B)". When passing <string, string>, the contract becomes "Anyone who implements me shall implement Bar(string)". – Rob Sep 25 '15 at 3:59
  • @Rob I don't think I misunderstand interfaces. I made a design mistake by not considering that an implementing class could pass the same type for A and B, thus creating this signature collision. I asked here because there was the slim hope that C# had some syntactic way for method parameters to indicate which interface parameter they represent, like: public void Bar(string a) where a represents IFoo::A { } But now I'm certain there is not, and I'll make the interface's method names unique. – Army Noodles Sep 25 '15 at 11:00
2

I don't think that you can solve that directly by only using one interface because the method signatures may unify for some cases.

If you realy need this feature I think you've to introduce a new interface that will be derived by foo.

public interface IBar<T>
{
    void Bar(T t);
}

public interface IFoo<A, B> : IBar<A>
{
    void Bar(B b);
}

Now you're able to explicitly implement both interfaces:

public class Foo : IFoo<string, string>
{
    void IFoo<string, string>.Bar(string b)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("IFoo<string, string>.Bar: " + b);
    }

    void IBar<string>.Bar(string t)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("IBar<string>.Bar: " + t);
    }
}

But if you want to use it you've to cast your instance to the special interface:

var foo = new Foo();
((IFoo<string, string>)foo).Bar("Hello");
((IBar<string>foo).Bar("World");

This prints as expected:

IFoo<string, string>.Bar: Hello
IBar<string>.Bar: World

Hopefully this will help you. I don't think that there is another way of doing that.

It is possible to implement only one interface explicitly so that you only need to cast if you want to call the other method.

  • Thank you. Changing the interface is costly and I tried to avoid it, but it looks like there is no way around it. I'll change the method names to BarA and BarB. – Army Noodles Sep 25 '15 at 10:57
1

You just need to remove the duplicate line:

interface IFoo<A, B>
{
    void Bar(A a);
    void Bar(B b);
}

class Foo : IFoo<string, string>
{
    public void Bar(string a) { }
}

In this case having a single implementation of void Bar(string a) implements both methods of the interface.

Actually calling the interfaces is much harder though. You need reflection.

  • Thank you. That makes the code compile, but it doesn't solve the problem. Bar(A) and Bar(B) are semantically different and thus can't be implemented by the same method. If there is no way to resolve the ambiguity, I'll have to change the method names. – Army Noodles Sep 25 '15 at 10:58
  • @ArmyNoodles - Yes, that's what you'd have to do. – Enigmativity Sep 25 '15 at 11:27
0

You can't do that.

Bar() will be ambiguous in this situation. Consider changing the interface methods to BarA(), BarB().

Also, consider making A and B more meaningful names (e.g., IFoo<TKey, TValue>), then your methods could be BarKey() and BarValue().

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