I am trying to understand when to use __getattr__ or __getattribute__. The documentation mentions __getattribute__ applies to new-style classes. What are new-style classes?

up vote 370 down vote accepted

A key difference between __getattr__ and __getattribute__ is that __getattr__ is only invoked if the attribute wasn't found the usual ways. It's good for implementing a fallback for missing attributes, and is probably the one of two you want.

__getattribute__ is invoked before looking at the actual attributes on the object, and so can be tricky to implement correctly. You can end up in infinite recursions very easily.

New-style classes derive from object, old-style classes are those in Python 2.x with no explicit base class. But the distinction between old-style and new-style classes is not the important one when choosing between __getattr__ and __getattribute__.

You almost certainly want __getattr__.

  • 4
    Can I implement both of them in the same class? If I can, what is it for implementing the both? – Alcott Oct 11 '11 at 1:22
  • 11
    @Alcott: you can implement them both, but I'm not sure why you would. __getattribute__ will be called for every access, and __getattr__ will be called for the times that __getattribute__ raised an AttributeError. Why not just keep it all in one? – Ned Batchelder Oct 11 '11 at 18:08
  • 5
    @NedBatchelder, if you want to (conditionally) override calls to existing methods, you would want to use __getattribute__. – Jace Browning Mar 6 '13 at 17:21
  • 19
    "In order to avoid infinite recursion in this method, its implementation should always call the base class method with the same name to access any attributes it needs, for example, object.__getattribute__(self, name)." – kmonsoor Jul 19 '14 at 18:01

Lets see some simple examples of both __getattr__ and __getattribute__ magic methods.

__getattr__

Python will call __getattr__ method whenever you request an attribute that hasn't already been defined. In the following example my class Count has no __getattr__ method. Now in main when I try to access both obj1.mymin and obj1.mymax attributes everything works fine. But when I try to access obj1.mycurrent attribute -- Python gives me AttributeError: 'Count' object has no attribute 'mycurrent'

class Count():
    def __init__(self,mymin,mymax):
        self.mymin=mymin
        self.mymax=mymax

obj1 = Count(1,10)
print(obj1.mymin)
print(obj1.mymax)
print(obj1.mycurrent)  --> AttributeError: 'Count' object has no attribute 'mycurrent'

Now my class Count has __getattr__ method. Now when I try to access obj1.mycurrent attribute -- python returns me whatever I have implemented in my __getattr__ method. In my example whenever I try to call an attribute which doesn't exist, python creates that attribute and set it to integer value 0.

class Count:
    def __init__(self,mymin,mymax):
        self.mymin=mymin
        self.mymax=mymax    

    def __getattr__(self, item):
        self.__dict__[item]=0
        return 0

obj1 = Count(1,10)
print(obj1.mymin)
print(obj1.mymax)
print(obj1.mycurrent1)

__getattribute__

Now lets see the __getattribute__ method. If you have __getattribute__ method in your class, python invokes this method for every attribute regardless whether it exists or not. So why we need __getattribute__ method? One good reason is that you can prevent access to attributes and make them more secure as shown in the following example.

Whenever someone try to access my attributes that starts with substring 'cur' python raises AttributeError exception. Otherwise it returns that attribute.

class Count:

    def __init__(self,mymin,mymax):
        self.mymin=mymin
        self.mymax=mymax
        self.current=None

    def __getattribute__(self, item):
        if item.startswith('cur'):
            raise AttributeError
        return object.__getattribute__(self,item) 
        # or you can use ---return super().__getattribute__(item)

obj1 = Count(1,10)
print(obj1.mymin)
print(obj1.mymax)
print(obj1.current)

Important: In order to avoid infinite recursion in __getattribute__ method, its implementation should always call the base class method with the same name to access any attributes it needs. For example: object.__getattribute__(self, name) or super().__getattribute__(item) and not self.__dict__[item]

IMPORTANT

If your class contain both getattr and getattribute magic methods then __getattribute__ is called first. But if __getattribute__ raises AttributeError exception then the exception will be ignored and __getattr__ method will be invoked. See the following example:

class Count(object):

    def __init__(self,mymin,mymax):
        self.mymin=mymin
        self.mymax=mymax
        self.current=None

    def __getattr__(self, item):
            self.__dict__[item]=0
            return 0

    def __getattribute__(self, item):
        if item.startswith('cur'):
            raise AttributeError
        return object.__getattribute__(self,item)
        # or you can use ---return super().__getattribute__(item)
        # note this class subclass object

obj1 = Count(1,10)
print(obj1.mymin)
print(obj1.mymax)
print(obj1.current)
  • I am not sure what exactly would be use case for overriding __getattribute__ but surely this isn't. Because per your example, all you are doing in __getattribute__ is raising AttributeError exception if the attribute isn't there in __dict__ of the object; but you don't really need this because this is default implementation of __getattribute__ and infact __getattr__ is exactly what you need as a fallback mechanism. – Rohit Sep 13 at 12:43

New-style classes inherit from object, or from another new style class:

class SomeObject(object):
    pass

class SubObject(SomeObject):
    pass

Old-style classes don't:

class SomeObject:
    pass

This only applies to Python 2 - in Python 3 all the above will create new-style classes.

See 9. Classes (Python tutorial), NewClassVsClassicClass and What is the difference between old style and new style classes in Python? for details.

This is just an example based on Ned Batchelder's explanation.

__getattr__ example:

class Foo(object):
    def __getattr__(self, attr):
        print "looking up", attr
        value = 42
        self.__dict__[attr] = value
        return value

f = Foo()
print f.x 
#output >>> looking up x 42

f.x = 3
print f.x 
#output >>> 3

print ('__getattr__ sets a default value if undefeined OR __getattr__ to define how to handle attributes that are not found')

And if same example is used with __getattribute__ You would get >>> RuntimeError: maximum recursion depth exceeded while calling a Python object

  • 7
    Actually, this is terrible. Real-world __getattr__() implementations only accept a finite set of valid attribute names by raising AttributeError for invalid attribute names, thereby avoiding subtle and difficult-to-debug issues. This example unconditionally accepts all attribute names as valid – a bizarre (and frankly error-prone) misuse of __getattr__(). If you want "total control" over attribute creation as in this example, you want __getattribute__() instead. – Cecil Curry Mar 12 '16 at 1:43
  • 2
    @CecilCurry: All the issues that you linked to involve implicitly returning None rather than a value, which this answer doesn't do. What's wrong with accepting all attribute names? It's the same as a defaultdict. – Kundor Apr 20 '17 at 17:20
  • 1
    The problem is that __getattr__ will be called before superclass lookup. This is OK for a direct subclass of object, since the only methods you really care about there are magic methods that ignore the instance anyway, but for any more complex inheritance structure, you completely remove the ability to inherit anything from the parent. – Mad Physicist Jul 27 '17 at 19:33
  • @Simon K Bhatta4ya, your last print statement is a comment. Right? It's a long line and tedious to read (One has to scroll a lot in the right side). What about putting the line after the code section? Or if you want to put it in the code section, I think it would be better to break it into two different lines. – Md. Abu Nafee Ibna Zahid Jun 20 at 7:12

New-style classes are ones that subclass "object" (directly or indirectly). They have a __new__ class method in addition to __init__ and have somewhat more rational low-level behavior.

Usually, you'll want to override __getattr__ (if you're overriding either), otherwise you'll have a hard time supporting "self.foo" syntax within your methods.

Extra info: http://www.devx.com/opensource/Article/31482/0/page/4

protected by coldspeed Aug 23 '17 at 8:55

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