2

Consider the following scenario:

I want to design a discount calculator which gets me the discount that can be applied to an order. There are two types of order: Online and In-Store. Based on type of the order and total amount of the order, a discount calculator calculates the discount.

I programmed to demonstrate the scenario in C# but the problem is language independent. In the below code, DiscountCalculator class calculates the discount by examining the actual type of input parameter.

I feel checking the actual type of IOrder argument in GetDiscount method is code smell; because I hid the implementation details behind the interface IOrder, then I somehow bring out of the box what was meant to be hidden.

    interface IOrder
    {
        int GetTotalPrice();
    }

    class InStoreOrder : IOrder
    {
        public int GetTotalPrice() { // returns the price of order }
    }

    class OnlineOrder : IOrder
    {
        public int GetTotalPrice() { // returns the price of order }
    }

    class DiscountCalculator
    {
        public int GetDiscount(IOrder order)
        {
            Type orderType = order.GetType();
            if (orderType == typeof(OnlineOrder))
            {
                if (order.GetTotalPrice() < 100)
                    return 2;
                else
                    return 5;
            }
            if (orderType == typeof(InStoreOrder))
            {
                if (order.GetTotalPrice() < 100)
                    return 3;
                else
                    return 6;
            }
            else
                throw new Exception("Unknown order type:" + orderType.Name);
        }
    }

Any idea?

Update:

I really appreciate people collaborating on this. All of the solutions were not only enlightening but also brought an elegant way on the table.

BTW, since the time all of the answers assured me that the solution is not good, I was thinking to myself that Abstract Factory may be a good alternative. Why? Because we are dealing with a family of related objects: Order and DiscountCalculator.

Something like this:

Factory f = new FactoryRepo ("Online");
IOrder order = f.CreateItem();
IDiscountCalculator discounter = f.CreateDiscountCalculator();
....

This way, I think for future changes, as @Dhruv Rai Puri pointed out, Decorator pattern may be easily applied.

Any Idea?

  • seems like you are asking a new question now. You would be better served to ask a new one, with this new, 2nd question. – iamkrillin Sep 28 '15 at 13:17
2

The solution of Strategy was already proposed https://stackoverflow.com/a/32798708/1168342, but this answer has some advantages.

Discounts and Orders are common domain problems. This wheel has been reinvented a few times. I'll cite a solution from chapter 26 of Craig Larman's "Applying UML and Patterns" book:

Pricing Strategy classes (part of Figure 26.9)

In this solution, a Sale is like your Order and ISalePricingStrategy is like your DiscountCalculator.

ISalePricingStrategy is an application of the Strategy pattern (the name is in the interface), and Strategies are always attached to a context object. In this case, it's the Sale (or in yours, IOrder).

Mapping to your problem

Here's the UML of how I see your problem fitting into Larman's suggested use of pricing strategies:

Pricing Strategy applied

Both your cases are composite instances of the AbsoluteDiscountOverThresholdPricingStrategy if I understand properly. Let's take the code from your conditional for OnlineOrders:

if (order.GetTotalPrice() < 100)
  return 2;
else
  return 5;

This is like adding to your order two instances of

onlineOrder.addPricingStrategy(new AbsoluteDiscountOverThresholdPricingStrategy(2,0));  // orders under 100
onlineOrder.addPricingStrategy(new AbsoluteDiscountOverThresholdPricingStrategy(5,100));  // orders >= 100

So, Larman goes a step further and explains that you can combine such strategies using the Composite pattern. I'll apply it to your problem (the hint is in the add... method above):

Composite strategies per Larman, figure 26.14

The two classes I put in pink are optional. If you always give the best strategy to the customer (as in the pseudocode of the note I attached to GetTotalPrice) you don't need them. Larman explains you can go a step further and say that if more than one strategy applies, the calculation is either in favor of the store or the customer. Again, it's a question of instantiating the class and attaching it. The code to do this could be run from a "Configuration" menu command in your software.

The code to use this would look something like:

IOrder onlineOrder = new OnlineOrder();  //...
...
CompositePricingStrategy comp = new CompositePricingStrategy();
comp.add(new AbsoluteDiscountOverThresholdPricingStrategy(2,0));  // orders under 100
comp.add(new AbsoluteDiscountOverThresholdPricingStrategy(5,100));  // orders >= 100
onlineOrder.setPricingStrategy(comp);
// repeat as above for instoreOrders ...

There are more flexible ways again to do this, using factories. See Larman's book for very cool examples in Java/.NET.

Advantages

Since this answer is similar to another one, I want to explain some advantages of this method, even though it's more complicated. If you use GetTotal() in the discount logic, it has some advantages over GetDiscount():

  • GetTotal() handles (encapsulates) all the logic to calculate the total.
  • If multiple strategies apply (e.g., online orders get 5% discount, orders over $200 get 10% discount) you may want to code how this is handled. Larman gives an example using Composite pattern where again GetTotal() works impeccably without the client code having to do anything special.
  • You can extend other types of Strategies and instantiate them as needed. For example, for any order over $500 you can make the discount 50. It's a question of instantiating the new class in the code (not coding the logic).
| improve this answer | |
  • Great answer with sufficient ingredients: Problem, Discussion, Solution, Reference, Pro/Con. Thanks – Hans Oct 1 '15 at 8:44
  • To complete the last advantage, I think Strategies can be decorated. May be better to extend the hierarchy, are you with me in this? – Hans Oct 1 '15 at 8:45
  • @Hans maybe - I would say you need to have a scenario where it's needed before you apply Decorator. Patterns are like tools to solve a problem. To use an analogy from the real world, I don't usually grab my drill and then walk around my house looking for places to make holes with it, just so I can say "I used my drill." – Fuhrmanator Oct 1 '15 at 13:53
3

Yes, checking the actual type of your input parameter is defeating the purpose of using an interface. A better approach would be to modify your IOrder interface like so

interface IOrder
{
   int GetTotalPrice();
   int GetDiscount();
}

Then allow each implementation to calculate the discount however is appropriate. Once you have done this you can simplify your method in DiscountCalculator to be just

order.GetDiscount();
| improve this answer | |
  • But your proposed solution violates SRP. – Hans Sep 25 '15 at 12:34
  • BTW thank you for your response. It is good to see that somebody else has the same idea as mine about the problem. – Hans Sep 25 '15 at 12:52
2

In my opinion, this looks like a good case for the Strategy Pattern.

Here is your re-worked sample

public interface IOrder
{
    int GetTotalPrice();
}

public interface IDiscountStrategy
{
    int CalculateDiscount(IOrder order);
}

public class InStoreOrder : IOrder
{
    public int GetTotalPrice()
    {
        return 25;
    }
}

public class OnlineOrder : IOrder
{
    public int GetTotalPrice()
    {
        return 25;
    }
}

public class InStoreOrderDiscountStrategy : IDiscountStrategy
{
    public int CalculateDiscount(IOrder order)
    {
        if (order.GetTotalPrice() < 100)
            return 3;
        else
            return 6;
    }
}

public class OnlineOrderDiscountStrategy : IDiscountStrategy
{
    public int CalculateDiscount(IOrder order)
    {
        if (order.GetTotalPrice() < 100)
            return 2;
        else
            return 5;

    }
}

public class DiscountCalculator
{
    readonly IDiscountStrategy _discountStrategy;

    public DiscountCalculator(IDiscountStrategy strategy)
    {
        _discountStrategy = strategy;
    }

    public int GetDiscount(IOrder order)
    {
        int discount = _discountStrategy.CalculateDiscount(order);
        return discount;
    }
}

... and here's a test sample for OnLineOrder

public void OnlineOrder_Discount_Equals_2()
{
    IOrder order = new OnlineOrder();
    IDiscountStrategy strategy = new OnlineOrderDiscountStrategy();

    DiscountCalculator calculator = new DiscountCalculator(strategy);
    int discount = calculator.GetDiscount(order);
    Assert.True(discount == 2);
}     

The idea is to encapsulate the discount calculation logic specific for each order type: on line or in-store. If the store introduces a "promotional" order type (say, new product was launched), the pattern can be extended to include the new logic while maintaining "Open/Closed" principle.

| improve this answer | |
1

yes its not so good to check for types after defining an interface as it defeats the purpose.

But I am not so convinced with the design solution given above i.e. the getOrderDiscount method. What if you have different discounts in the same store Instore or different discounts online - say a temporary site-wide discount in addition to the item-specific one. The design which has a getOrderDiscount() method does not consider these scenarios.

But if these scenarios are not possible/applicable then you can ignore my next para.Actually I have worked in a retail product software organization hence am thinking of so many possibilities.

  • There should be an IItemDiscount interface which should be used to "decorate" an item at the time of listing and/or order checkout.
  • The IOrder instance should have a applyOrderDiscounts(basically a twist on the existing getOrderDiscount()) method which should take a list of Order Level Discounts which can be applied to the order.
| improve this answer | |
  • Very elegant solution! I actually couldn't think about Decorator pattern. – Hans Sep 27 '15 at 1:51

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