I have been reading a bunch of react code and I see stuff like this that I don't understand:

handleChange = field => e => {
  e.preventDefault();
  /// Do something here
}
  • 14
    Presumably a => b => ... parses as a => (b => ...), i.e. function (field) { return function (e) { e.preventDefault(); }; } in your example. – melpomene Sep 25 '15 at 13:07
  • 20
    I know it's probably just because I'm not up to speed with them but that looks so insanely unreadable to me :\ – Darragh Enright Sep 25 '15 at 13:08
  • 3
    The code pasted into babeljs.io/repl transpiles into what @melpomene suggests. I think it could be posted as an answer. One thing I don't get is why they'd use it over handleChandge = e => {} – pawel Sep 25 '15 at 13:18
  • 2
    Just for fun, Kyle Simpson put all the decision paths for arrows into this flow chart. Source: His comment on a Mozilla Hacks blog post entitled ES6 In Depth: Arrow functions – gfullam Sep 25 '15 at 14:55
  • 5
    Can we maybe not call it "fat arrow function"? There is no "thin arrow function" and the official terminology is "arrow function". – Felix Kling Sep 25 '15 at 15:05

That is a curried function

First, examine this function with two parameters …

let add = (x,y) => x + y;
add(2,3); //=> 5

Here it is again in curried form …

let add = x => y => x + y;

Here is the same code1 without arrow functions …

let add = function (x) {
  return function (y) {
    return x + y;
  };
};

Focus on return

It might help to visualize it another way. We know that arrow functions work like this – let's pay particular attention to the return value.

let f = someParam => returnValue

So our add function returns a function – we can use parentheses for added clarity. The bolded text is the return value of our function add

let add = x => (y => x + y)

In other words add of some number returns a function

add(2) // returns (y => 2 + y)

Calling curried functions

So in order to use our curried function, we have to call it a bit differently …

add(2)(3); // returns 5

This is because the first (outer) function call returns a second (inner) function. Only after we call the second function do we actually get the result. This is more evident if we separate the calls on two lines …

let add2 = add(2); // returns function(y) { return 2 + y }
add2(3);           // returns 5

Applying our new understanding to your code

related: ”What’s the difference between binding, partial application, and currying?”

OK, now that we understand how that works, let's look at your code

handleChange = field => e => {
  e.preventDefault();
  /// Do something here
}

We'll start by representing it without using arrow functions …

handleChange = function(field) {
  return function(e) {
    e.preventDefault();
    // Do something here
    // return ...
  };
};

However, because arrow functions lexically bind this, it would actually look more like this …

handleChange = function(field) {
  return function(e) {
    e.preventDefault();
    // Do something here
    // return ...
  }.bind(this);
}.bind(this);

Maybe now we can see what this is doing more clearly. The handleChange function is creating a function for a specified field. This is a handy React technique because you're required to setup your own listeners on each input in order to update your applications state. By using the handleChange function, we can eliminate all the duplicated code that would result in setting up change listeners for each field.

Cool !


1 Here I did not have to lexically bind this because the original add function does not use any context, so it is not important to preserve it in this case.

  • 1
    Amazing explanation, thanks! – clever_bassi Nov 30 at 7:59

Understanding the available syntaxes of arrow functions will give you an understanding of what behaviour they are introducing when 'chained' like in the examples you provided.

When an arrow function is written without block braces, with or without multiple parameters, the expression that constitutes the function's body is implicitly returned. In your example, that expression is another arrow function.

No arrow funcs              Implicitly return `e=>{…}`    Explicitly return `e=>{…}` 
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------
function (field) {         |  field => e => {            |  field => {
  return function (e) {    |                             |    return e => {
      e.preventDefault()   |    e.preventDefault()       |      e.preventDefault()
  }                        |                             |    }
}                          |  }                          |  }

Another advantage of writing anonymous functions using the arrow syntax is that they are bound lexically to the scope in which they are defined. From 'Arrow functions' on MDN:

An arrow function expression has a shorter syntax compared to function expressions and lexically binds the this value. Arrow functions are always anonymous.

This is particularly pertinent in your example considering that it is taken from a application. As as pointed out by @naomik, in React you often access a component's member functions using this. For example:

Unbound                     Explicitly bound            Implicitly bound 
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
function (field) {         |  function (field) {       |  field => e => {
  return function (e) {    |    return function (e) {  |    
      this.setState(...)   |      this.setState(...)   |    this.setState(...)
  }                        |    }.bind(this)           |    
}                          |  }.bind(this)             |  }
  • 5
    There is no "thin arrow function". Why not stick with the official terminology and call it "arrow function"? – Felix Kling Sep 25 '15 at 15:06
  • You should mention something about arrow function's lexical this – user633183 Sep 25 '15 at 17:42
  • 2
    @sdgluck but it is extremely important in the use case provided by jhamm. If he just used your first bit of code, it wouldn't operate properly because non-arrow functions (function(){...})) do not lexically bind this. I realize he/she hasn't expanded the code in Do something here, but knowing this is part of a React component means the inner function is likely to call out to other code within the component. – user633183 Sep 25 '15 at 17:49
  • 1
    Perhaps something like handleChange = field => e => { e.preventDefault(); this.setState(...); }; -- this.setState is defined in his code, but undefined in yours. – user633183 Sep 25 '15 at 17:53
  • 1
    @naomik I concede -- you are right that if OP was to employ common React code in the first example in my answer they would encounter problems. I will amend my post to make a point of this. Thanks! – sdgluck Sep 26 '15 at 8:44

A general tip , if you get confused by any of new JS syntax and how it will compile , you can check babel. For example copying your code in babel and selecting the es2015 preset will give an output like this

handleChange = function handleChange(field) {
 return function (e) {
 e.preventDefault();
  // Do something here
   };
 };

babel

Think of it like this, every time you see a arrow, you replace it with function.
function parameters are defined before the arrow.
So in your example:

field => // function(field){}
e => { e.preventDefault(); } // function(e){e.preventDefault();}

and then together:

function (field) { 
    return function (e) { 
        e.preventDefault(); 
    };
}

From the docs:

// Basic syntax:
(param1, param2, paramN) => { statements }
(param1, param2, paramN) => expression
   // equivalent to:  => { return expression; }

// Parentheses are optional when there's only one argument:
singleParam => { statements }
singleParam => expression
  • 4
    Don't forget to mention the lexically bound this. – user633183 Sep 25 '15 at 17:54

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