47

I have several utility functions. What is the best way to package these up, and then import them?

This is what I am trying to do:

import * as util from './util'

export class myClass{
     constructor()
     {
           util.doSomething("test");
     }
}

Then in the class:

export class Util{
    doSomething(val: string){ return val;}

    doSomethingElse(val: string{ return val;}
}

The error message I get from VS is "Property doSomething does not exist on type util."

82

If you create a file utils.ts which contains

export default class Utils {
    static doSomething(val: string) { return val; }
    static doSomethingElse(val: string) { return val; }
}

then you can simplify your client code like this:

import Utils from './utils'

export class MyClass {
     constructor()
     {
         Utils.doSomething("test");
     }
}
  • 3
    This is the way I prefer to do it now. – Greg Gum Jul 20 '16 at 0:30
  • Do the methods have to be static? Can't an instance of Utils class be created an used? – user728630 Sep 20 '16 at 2:40
  • 5
    @GregGum Wrapping your stateless functions in a class just for the heck of it is a bad idea, because it breaks module optimization techniques like tree-shaking. You should export everything as close to the top level of the module as possible. – Asad Saeeduddin Sep 20 '16 at 2:57
  • 1
    @AsadSaeeduddin, good point, I totally agree. – Greg Gum Sep 20 '16 at 9:51
  • 5
    Based on comments on my answer it seems I didn't sufficiently clarify this in my previous comment: wrapping entirely stateless functions as static members of a class Utils, as shown in this answer, is a bad idea. It will break module optimization for no benefit whatsoever to you. If your members, like doSomething and doSomethingElse, are entirely stateless, and do not reference private members of a class, they should not be in a class at all. You should directly export them using export function doSomething .... – Asad Saeeduddin Jan 27 '18 at 19:53
36

There's a couple problems here:

  1. You're not instantiating anything, and doSomething is an instance method
  2. When you do import * as util, util represents the module, not an object in it.

If you want Util, you should just import that:

import { Util } from './util'

Next, you should instantiate Util, before finally calling the method on it:

var u = new Util();
u.doSomething("test");

Here's your code patched up:

import { Util } from './util'

export class MyClass{
     constructor()
     {
         var u = new Util();
         u.doSomething("test");
     }
}

All that said, there seems to be something odd about the way you're using your utils. This is totally personal opinion, but I wouldn't invoke methods that "do something", i.e. cause side effects, in a constructor.

Also, the methods in Util don't really look like they need to be in that class, since the class holds no state that they depend on. You can always export regular functions from a module. If you wrote your utils module like this:

export function doSomething(val: string) { return val; }

export function doSomethingElse(val: string) { return val; }

you'd be exporting your functions directly and would sidestep the instantiation hassle, and in fact your original code would work correctly as is.

  • 1
    Thank you. Yes, export function... is what I was trying to do. – Greg Gum Sep 25 '15 at 21:04
  • 1
    Util modules should'nt be instantiated as an instance with the new keyword. If you want to follow standard conventions, and reduce execution context creation, the Util class methods should be static methods, accessed via Util.doSomething() – Drenai Jan 27 '18 at 13:23
  • @Ryan You are wrong. If the functionality you are exporting is dependent on some state, you should export it as an instantiable class. If it is stateless, as in this case, you should export it as top level independent exports. If you just cram them into a static class for no reason you break tree shaking for no benefit to yourself. – Asad Saeeduddin Jan 27 '18 at 19:47
  • The original question describes a Util that does not depend on any state. They are straight static functions. Are you saying that tree shaking will break unless you instantiatle the Util? – Drenai Jan 27 '18 at 19:51
  • 1
    No, I am saying tree shaking will break if you do class Util at all. Since the members are stateless (which I mentioned in my answer, and at this point in two different comments), you should not have a class at all. You should export the members directly, in order to exploit tree shaking. – Asad Saeeduddin Jan 27 '18 at 19:52
1

Alternative way:
1) Export constants in your utils.ts file:

export const doSomething = (val: string): any => {
  return val;
};

export const doSomethingElse = (val: string): any => {
  return val;
};

2) Import and use this methods in main *.ts file:

import { doSomething, doSomethingElse } from './util';
...
let value1 = doSomething('abc');
let value2 = doSomethingElse ('efg');
0

Or you could export is as an object literal:

export const Util = {
    doSomething(val: string){ return val;},
    doSomethingElse(val: string{ return val;}
}
0

you can also create a util.ts class which has a function to export

export const formatDateOfBirth = 
(dob: string) : string => `${dob.substring(0, 4)}-${dob.substring(4, 6)}-${dob.substring(6, 8)}`;

now you can import the method as below, shared folder structure is src > app > shared, i am calling this import inside src > app > shelf > shelf.component.ts file

import { formatDateOfBirth } from '../shared/utils/util';
public getFormattedDate(dob: string):string{
  return formatDateOfBirth(dob);
}

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