13

I have a set of points in a 3D space, from which I need to find the Pareto frontier. Speed of execution is very important here, and time increases very fast as I add points to test.

The set of points looks like this:

[[0.3296170319979843, 0.0, 0.44472108843537406], [0.3296170319979843,0.0, 0.44472108843537406], [0.32920760896951373, 0.0, 0.4440408163265306], [0.32920760896951373, 0.0, 0.4440408163265306], [0.33815192743764166, 0.0, 0.44356462585034007]]

Right now, I'm using this algorithm:

def dominates(row, candidateRow):
    return sum([row[x] >= candidateRow[x] for x in range(len(row))]) == len(row) 

def simple_cull(inputPoints, dominates):
    paretoPoints = set()
    candidateRowNr = 0
    dominatedPoints = set()
    while True:
        candidateRow = inputPoints[candidateRowNr]
        inputPoints.remove(candidateRow)
        rowNr = 0
        nonDominated = True
        while len(inputPoints) != 0 and rowNr < len(inputPoints):
            row = inputPoints[rowNr]
            if dominates(candidateRow, row):
                # If it is worse on all features remove the row from the array
                inputPoints.remove(row)
                dominatedPoints.add(tuple(row))
            elif dominates(row, candidateRow):
                nonDominated = False
                dominatedPoints.add(tuple(candidateRow))
                rowNr += 1
            else:
                rowNr += 1

        if nonDominated:
            # add the non-dominated point to the Pareto frontier
            paretoPoints.add(tuple(candidateRow))

        if len(inputPoints) == 0:
            break
    return paretoPoints, dominatedPoints

Found here: http://code.activestate.com/recipes/578287-multidimensional-pareto-front/

What's the fastest way to find the set of non-dominated solutions in an ensemble of solutions? Or, in short, can Python do better than this algorithm?

18

If you're worried about actual speed, you definitely want to use numpy (as the clever algorithmic tweaks probably have way less effect than the gains to be had from using array operations). Here are three solutions that all compute the same function. The is_pareto_efficient_dumb solution is slower in most situations but becomes faster as the number of costs increases, the is_pareto_efficient_simple solution is much more efficient than the dumb solution for many points, and the final is_pareto_efficient function is less readable but the fastest (so all are Pareto Efficient!).

import numpy as np


# Very slow for many datapoints.  Fastest for many costs, most readable
def is_pareto_efficient_dumb(costs):
    """
    Find the pareto-efficient points
    :param costs: An (n_points, n_costs) array
    :return: A (n_points, ) boolean array, indicating whether each point is Pareto efficient
    """
    is_efficient = np.ones(costs.shape[0], dtype = bool)
    for i, c in enumerate(costs):
        is_efficient[i] = np.all(np.any(costs[:i]>c, axis=1)) and np.all(np.any(costs[i+1:]>c, axis=1))
    return is_efficient


# Fairly fast for many datapoints, less fast for many costs, somewhat readable
def is_pareto_efficient_simple(costs):
    """
    Find the pareto-efficient points
    :param costs: An (n_points, n_costs) array
    :return: A (n_points, ) boolean array, indicating whether each point is Pareto efficient
    """
    is_efficient = np.ones(costs.shape[0], dtype = bool)
    for i, c in enumerate(costs):
        if is_efficient[i]:
            is_efficient[is_efficient] = np.any(costs[is_efficient]<c, axis=1)  # Keep any point with a lower cost
            is_efficient[i] = True  # And keep self
    return is_efficient


# Faster than is_pareto_efficient_simple, but less readable.
def is_pareto_efficient(costs, return_mask = True):
    """
    Find the pareto-efficient points
    :param costs: An (n_points, n_costs) array
    :param return_mask: True to return a mask
    :return: An array of indices of pareto-efficient points.
        If return_mask is True, this will be an (n_points, ) boolean array
        Otherwise it will be a (n_efficient_points, ) integer array of indices.
    """
    is_efficient = np.arange(costs.shape[0])
    n_points = costs.shape[0]
    next_point_index = 0  # Next index in the is_efficient array to search for
    while next_point_index<len(costs):
        nondominated_point_mask = np.any(costs<costs[next_point_index], axis=1)
        nondominated_point_mask[next_point_index] = True
        is_efficient = is_efficient[nondominated_point_mask]  # Remove dominated points
        costs = costs[nondominated_point_mask]
        next_point_index = np.sum(nondominated_point_mask[:next_point_index])+1
    if return_mask:
        is_efficient_mask = np.zeros(n_points, dtype = bool)
        is_efficient_mask[is_efficient] = True
        return is_efficient_mask
    else:
        return is_efficient

Profiling tests (using points drawn from a Normal distribution):

With 10,000 samples, 2 costs:

is_pareto_efficient_dumb: Elapsed time is 1.586s
is_pareto_efficient_simple: Elapsed time is 0.009653s
is_pareto_efficient: Elapsed time is 0.005479s

With 1,000,000 samples, 2 costs:

is_pareto_efficient_dumb: Really, really, slow
is_pareto_efficient_simple: Elapsed time is 1.174s
is_pareto_efficient: Elapsed time is 0.4033s

With 10,000 samples, 15 costs:

is_pareto_efficient_dumb: Elapsed time is 4.019s
is_pareto_efficient_simple: Elapsed time is 6.466s
is_pareto_efficient: Elapsed time is 6.41s

Note that if efficiency is a concern you can gain maybe a further 2x or so speedup by reordering your data beforehand, see here.

  • 2
    Wow, I missed it, thank you Peter! I"m not quite sure I get the cost array though, could you provide a short example? Thanks once again, this looks fantastic. – Rodolphe Jan 2 '17 at 18:37
  • 1
    Cost array is just a 2-d array where cost[i, j] is the j'th cost of the i'th data point. I think it's the same as your inputPoints array. You can see the tests here, which demonstrate its use. – Peter Jan 3 '17 at 10:46
  • 1
    I tested it with a simple example and the first two functions do not return the pareto front. The example: numpy.array([[1,2], [3,4], [2,1], [1,1]]) It returns the following: [ True False True True] But it should return by the definition of pareto front this: [ False False False True] – hyperionb Dec 16 '18 at 23:34
  • 1
    A fix for the def is_pareto_efficient(costs): would look like this (replace the mentioned lines): is_efficient[is_efficient] = np.any(costs[is_efficient]<c, axis=1) # Remove dominated points is_efficient[i] = True – hyperionb Dec 16 '18 at 23:49
  • Thanks for finding that @hyperionb - I hadn't tested on integers. I updated the functions with your fix. – Peter Dec 19 '18 at 10:01
7

Edit

I ended up looking at this problem recently and found a useful heuristic that works well if there are many points distributed independently and dimensions are few.

The idea is to compute the convex hull of points. With few dimensions and independently distributed points, the number of vertices of the convex hull will be small. Intuitively, we can expect some vertices of the convex hull to dominate many of the original points. Moreover, if a point in a convex hull is not dominated by any other point in the convex hull, then it is also not dominated by any point in the original set.

This gives a simple iterative algorithm. We repeatedly

  1. Compute the convex hull.
  2. Save Pareto undominated points from the convex hull.
  3. Filter the points to remove those dominated by elements of the convex hull.

I add a few benchmarks for dimension 3. It seems that for some distribution of points this approach yields better asymptotics.

import numpy as np
from scipy import spatial
from functools import reduce

# test points
pts = np.random.rand(10_000_000, 3)


def filter_(pts, pt):
    """
    Get all points in pts that are not Pareto dominated by the point pt
    """
    weakly_worse   = (pts <= pt).all(axis=-1)
    strictly_worse = (pts < pt).any(axis=-1)
    return pts[~(weakly_worse & strictly_worse)]


def get_pareto_undominated_by(pts1, pts2=None):
    """
    Return all points in pts1 that are not Pareto dominated
    by any points in pts2
    """
    if pts2 is None:
        pts2 = pts1
    return reduce(filter_, pts2, pts1)


def get_pareto_frontier(pts):
    """
    Iteratively filter points based on the convex hull heuristic
    """
    pareto_groups = []

    # loop while there are points remaining
    while pts.shape[0]:
        # brute force if there are few points:
        if pts.shape[0] < 10:
            pareto_groups.append(get_pareto_undominated_by(pts))
            break

        # compute vertices of the convex hull
        hull_vertices = spatial.ConvexHull(pts).vertices

        # get corresponding points
        hull_pts = pts[hull_vertices]

        # get points in pts that are not convex hull vertices
        nonhull_mask = np.ones(pts.shape[0], dtype=bool)
        nonhull_mask[hull_vertices] = False
        pts = pts[nonhull_mask]

        # get points in the convex hull that are on the Pareto frontier
        pareto   = get_pareto_undominated_by(hull_pts)
        pareto_groups.append(pareto)

        # filter remaining points to keep those not dominated by
        # Pareto points of the convex hull
        pts = get_pareto_undominated_by(pts, pareto)

    return np.vstack(pareto_groups)

# --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
# previous solutions
# --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

def is_pareto_efficient_dumb(costs):
    """
    :param costs: An (n_points, n_costs) array
    :return: A (n_points, ) boolean array, indicating whether each point is Pareto efficient
    """
    is_efficient = np.ones(costs.shape[0], dtype = bool)
    for i, c in enumerate(costs):
        is_efficient[i] = np.all(np.any(costs>=c, axis=1))
    return is_efficient


def is_pareto_efficient(costs):
    """
    :param costs: An (n_points, n_costs) array
    :return: A (n_points, ) boolean array, indicating whether each point is Pareto efficient
    """
    is_efficient = np.ones(costs.shape[0], dtype = bool)
    for i, c in enumerate(costs):
        if is_efficient[i]:
            is_efficient[is_efficient] = np.any(costs[is_efficient]<=c, axis=1)  # Remove dominated points
    return is_efficient


def dominates(row, rowCandidate):
    return all(r >= rc for r, rc in zip(row, rowCandidate))


def cull(pts, dominates):
    dominated = []
    cleared = []
    remaining = pts
    while remaining:
        candidate = remaining[0]
        new_remaining = []
        for other in remaining[1:]:
            [new_remaining, dominated][dominates(candidate, other)].append(other)
        if not any(dominates(other, candidate) for other in new_remaining):
            cleared.append(candidate)
        else:
            dominated.append(candidate)
        remaining = new_remaining
    return cleared, dominated

# --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
# benchmarking
# --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

# to accomodate the original non-numpy solution
pts_list = [list(pt) for pt in pts]

import timeit

# print('Old non-numpy solution:s\t{}'.format(
    # timeit.timeit('cull(pts_list, dominates)', number=3, globals=globals())))

print('Numpy solution:\t{}'.format(
    timeit.timeit('is_pareto_efficient(pts)', number=3, globals=globals())))

print('Convex hull heuristic:\t{}'.format(
    timeit.timeit('get_pareto_frontier(pts)', number=3, globals=globals())))

Results

# >>= python temp.py # 1,000 points
# Old non-numpy solution:      0.0316428339574486
# Numpy solution:              0.005961259012110531
# Convex hull heuristic:       0.012369581032544374
# >>= python temp.py # 1,000,000 points
# Old non-numpy solution:      70.67529802105855
# Numpy solution:              5.398462114972062
# Convex hull heuristic:       1.5286884519737214
# >>= python temp.py # 10,000,000 points
# Numpy solution:              98.03680767398328
# Convex hull heuristic:       10.203076395904645

Original Post

I took a shot at rewriting the same algorithm with a couple of tweaks. I think most of your problems come from inputPoints.remove(row). This requires searching through the list of points; removing by index would be much more efficient. I also modified the dominates function to avoid some redundant comparisons. This could be handy in a higher dimension.

def dominates(row, rowCandidate):
    return all(r >= rc for r, rc in zip(row, rowCandidate))

def cull(pts, dominates):
    dominated = []
    cleared = []
    remaining = pts
    while remaining:
        candidate = remaining[0]
        new_remaining = []
        for other in remaining[1:]:
            [new_remaining, dominated][dominates(candidate, other)].append(other)
        if not any(dominates(other, candidate) for other in new_remaining):
            cleared.append(candidate)
        else:
            dominated.append(candidate)
        remaining = new_remaining
    return cleared, dominated
  • Thanks, I'm trying right now. Any idea how it would compare to the first answer here: stackoverflow.com/questions/21294829/… ? – Rodolphe Sep 26 '15 at 19:53
  • 1
    I am not sure. I attempted something similar as my first crack at the solution. For each dimension, I sorted points by value and obtained index pairs. Taking the intersection of all such lists of pairs gives all domination relations. I could not make my python code run as fast as this, however. – hilberts_drinking_problem Sep 26 '15 at 21:19
1

The definition of dominates is incorrect. A dominates B if and only if it is better than or equal to B on all dimensions, and strictly better on at least one dimension.

1

Peter, nice response.

I just wanted to generalise for those who want to choose between maximisation to your default of minimisation. It's a trivial fix, but nice to document here:

def is_pareto(costs, maximise=False):
    """
    :param costs: An (n_points, n_costs) array
    :maximise: boolean. True for maximising, False for minimising
    :return: A (n_points, ) boolean array, indicating whether each point is Pareto efficient
    """
    is_efficient = np.ones(costs.shape[0], dtype = bool)
    for i, c in enumerate(costs):
        if is_efficient[i]:
            if maximise:
                is_efficient[is_efficient] = np.any(costs[is_efficient]>=c, axis=1)  # Remove dominated points
            else:
                is_efficient[is_efficient] = np.any(costs[is_efficient]<=c, axis=1)  # Remove dominated points
    return is_efficient

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