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What is the difference between wait-die and wound-wait?

I found that both the techniques of deadlock prevention are doing the same thing (Rollback of Older process).

Can anybody explain me what is the difference between them with suitable example ?

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Wait-die scheme: It is a non-preemptive technique for deadlock prevention. When transaction Ti requests a data item currently held by Tj, Ti is allowed to wait only if it has a timestamp smaller than that of Tj (That is Ti is older than Tj), otherwise Ti is rolled back (dies).

In this scheme, if a transaction requests to lock a resource (data item), which is already held with a conflicting lock by another transaction, then one of the two possibilities may occur −

(1) If TS(Ti) < TS(Tj) − that is Ti, which is requesting a conflicting lock, is older than Tj − then Ti is allowed to wait until the data-item is available.

(2) If TS(Ti) > TS(tj) − that is Ti is younger than Tj − then Ti dies. Ti is restarted later with a random delay but with the same timestamp.

This scheme allows the older transaction to wait but kills the younger one.

For example:

Suppose that transaction T22, T23, T24 have time-stamps 5, 10 and 15 respectively. If T22requests a data item held by T23 then T22 will wait. If T24 requests a data item held by T23, then T24 will be rolled back.

Wound-wait scheme: It is a preemptive technique for deadlock prevention. It is a counterpart to the wait-die scheme. When Transaction Ti requests a data item currently held by Tj, Ti is allowed to wait only if it has a timestamp larger than that of Tj, otherwise Tj is rolled back (Tj is wounded by Ti).

In this scheme, if a transaction requests to lock a resource (data item), which is already held with conflicting lock by some another transaction, one of the two possibilities may occur −

(1) If TS(Ti) < TS(Tj), then Ti forces Tj to be rolled back − that is Ti wounds Tj. Tj is restarted later with a random delay but with the same timestamp.

(2) If TS(Ti) > TS(Tj), then Ti is forced to wait until the resource is available.

This scheme, allows the younger transaction to wait; but when an older transaction requests an item held by a younger one, the older transaction forces the younger one to abort and release the item.

For example:

Suppose that Transactions T22, T23, T24 have time-stamps 5, 10 and 15 respectively . If T22requests a data item held by T23, then data item will be preempted from T23 and T23 will be rolled back. If T24 requests a data item held by T23, then T24 will wait.

In both the cases, the transaction that enters the system at a later stage is aborted.

6

Parth has given a detailed answer. Here I summarize it in a different way.

Assume that Ti requests a lock held by Tj. The following table summarizes the actions taken for wait-die and wound-wait scheme:

                           wait-die         wound-wait
Ti is younger than Tj      Ti dies          Ti waits
Ti is older than Tj        Ti waits         Tj aborts

Both schemes prefer older transactions with an older timestamp.

  • Great answer, but is die same as abort/rollback ? – P_95 Feb 27 '17 at 16:16
  • 1
    @P_95 Yes, die is the same as abort/rollback. – Jingguo Yao Mar 1 '17 at 15:35
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In both cases Old is always champ i.e. will survive. Difference is from younger transaction point of view.

If younger one is requesting a resource held by a old trans. , in wait/die he can wait to give respect as Old trans.If younger one is requesting a resource held by a old trans., in wound/die he will be force to rollback as Old trans.

In both scheme old is never in loss.

Refer:https://www.tutorialspoint.com/dbms/dbms_deadlock.htm

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wait-die: When an older transaction tries to lock a DB element that has been locked by a younger transaction, it waits. When a younger transaction tries to lock a DB element that has been locked by an older transaction, it dies.

wound-wait: When an older transaction tries to lock a DB element that has been locked by a younger transaction, it wounds the younger transaction. When a younger transaction tries to lock a DB element that has been locked by an older transaction, it waits.


References:

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