5

I am looking at the article from MSDN Guidelines for Overloading Equals() and Operator ==

and I saw the following code

public override bool Equals(object obj)
{
    // If parameter is null return false.
    if (obj == null)
    {
        return false;
    }

    // If parameter cannot be cast to Point return false.
    TwoDPoint p = obj as TwoDPoint;
    if ((System.Object)p == null)
    {
        return false;
    }

    // Return true if the fields match:
    return (x == p.x) && (y == p.y);
}

the strange thing is the cast to object in the second if

// If parameter cannot be cast to Point return false.
TwoDPoint p = obj as TwoDPoint;
if ((object)p == null)
{
    return false;
}

Why p is casted again to object? Isn't it enough to write this

// If parameter cannot be cast to Point return false.
TwoDPoint p = obj as TwoDPoint;
if (p == null)
{
    return false;
}

If p cannot be casted to TwoDPoint, then it's value will be null. I am puzzled, probably I don't understand something trivial ...

EDIT

One more such cast is presented in the other Equals method

public bool Equals(TwoDPoint p)
{
    // If parameter is null return false:
    if ((object)p == null)
    {
        return false;
    }
}

Here again it's enough to check only if(p == null)

  • 1
    This is a code smell. They should have used ReferenceEquals. – usr Sep 26 '15 at 11:07
7

(object)p == null uses the built-in == operator that in this case checks for reference equality. p == null would call an overloaded operator== for the specified type. If the overloaded operator== would be implemented in terms of Equals (it's not, in the sample you link to), then you'd have infinite recursion. Even if it's not implemented in terms of Equals, it would still do more than needs to be done.

4

Just to complete both answers, the documentation you looked at is outdated as stated on the top of the page. If you look at the newer guidelines, there is a note which explains exactly why that is being done:

A common error in overloads of operator == is to use (a == b), (a == null), or (b == null) to check for reference equality. This instead creates a call to the overloaded operator ==, causing an infinite loop. Use ReferenceEquals or cast the type to Object, to avoid the loop.

Basically, doing so is equal to using object.ReferenceEquals, which is what the code is actually trying to do:

TwoDPoint p = obj as TwoDPoint;
if (object.ReferenceEquals(p, null))
{
    return false;
}
2

This is to ensure that the called == operator is the default implementation from Object, not the user-defined one. It is a common error to introduce unbounded recursion in code like this by having your own operators call themselves.

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