10

If I want to add 100 years in my program, why is it showing the wrong date?

import datetime
stringDate= "January 10, 1920"
dateObject= datetime.datetime.strptime(stringDate, "%B %d, %Y")
endDate= dateObject+datetime.timedelta(days=100*365)
print dateObject.date()
print endDate.date()
  • 4
    Because years aren't all exactly 365 days long? – jonrsharpe Sep 26 '15 at 16:38
15

The number of seconds in a year is not fixed. Think you know how many days are in a year? Think again.

To perform period (calendar) arithmetic, you could use dateutil.relativedelta:

#!/usr/bin/env python
from datetime import date
from dateutil.relativedelta import relativedelta # $ pip install python-dateutil

print(date(1920, 1, 10) + relativedelta(years=+100))
# -> 2020-01-10

To understand, why d.replace(year=d.year + 100) fails, consider:

print(date(2000, 2, 29) + relativedelta(years=+100))
2100-02-28

Notice that 2100 is not a leap year while 2000 is a leap year.

If the only units you want to add is year then you could implement it using only stdlib:

from calendar import isleap

def add_years(d, years):
    new_year = d.year + years
    try:
        return d.replace(year=new_year)
    except ValueError:
        if (d.month == 2 and d.day == 29 and # leap day
            isleap(d.year) and not isleap(new_year)):
            return d.replace(year=new_year, day=28)
        raise

Example:

from datetime import date

print(add_years(date(1920, 1, 10), 100))
# -> 2020-01-10
print(add_years(date(2000, 2, 29), 100))
# -> 2100-02-28
print(add_years(date(2000, 2, 29), 4))
# -> 2004-02-29
  • @amunnelly it is not a typo. It is for readability (to highlight the sign of the operation). – jfs Apr 18 '18 at 10:13
  • @jfs you're right. Just noticed which side the + is on. My apologies - I'm having a slow morning. I'll delete the original comment. – amunnelly Apr 18 '18 at 10:29
  • @jfs Your first two links go to a deleted question and a paywalled site. – ekhumoro Aug 11 '20 at 11:50
  • @ekhumoro I can see information in both links. They provide background info -- if you can't see them, just ignore them (though I think you should be able to see them) -- the answer can be used without them. At a glance, it doesn't look like the accepted answer in your linked duplicate handles OP's case. – jfs Aug 11 '20 at 17:36
  • @jfs Only 10k users can see deleted questions, and paywalled sites also aren't accessible to everyone. This question is very obviously a duplicate since the only difference is in the number of years. The linked question has several answers, one of which contains a solution identical to yours. There is no accepted answer. – ekhumoro Aug 11 '20 at 17:58
10

You can't just add 100 * 365 days, because there are leap years with 366 days in that timespan. Over your 100 year span you are missing 25 days.

Better to just use the datetime.replace() method here:

endDate = dateObject.replace(year=dateObject.year + 100)

This can still fail for February 29th in a leap year, as depending on the number of years you add you'd end up with an invalid date. You could move back to February 28th in that case, or use March 31st; handle the exception thrown and switch to your chosen replacement:

years = 100
try:
    endDate = dateObject.replace(year=dateObject.year + years)
except ValueError::
    # Leap day in a leap year, move date to February 28th
    endDate = dateObject.replace(year=dateObject.year + years, day=28)

Demo:

>>> import datetime
>>> dateObject = datetime.datetime(1920, 1, 10, 0, 0)
>>> dateObject.replace(year=dateObject.year + 100)
datetime.datetime(2020, 1, 10, 0, 0)
1

man 3 mktime

Anyone who ever did C knows the answer.

mktime automatically adds overflowing values to the next bigger unit. You just need to convert it back to a datetime.

For example you can feed it with 2019-07-40, which converts to 2019-08-09.

>>> datetime.fromtimestamp(mktime((2019, 7, 40, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0)))
datetime.datetime(2019, 8, 9, 0, 0)

Or 2019-03-(-1) is converted to 2019-02-27:

>>> datetime.fromtimestamp(mktime((2019, 3, -1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0)))
datetime.datetime(2019, 2, 27, 0, 0)

So you just take your old date and add whatever you like:

now = datetime.datetime.now()
hundred_days_later = datetime.datetime.fromtimestamp(mktime((now.year, now.month, now.day + 100, now.hour, now.minute, now.second, 0, 0, 0)))

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