4

I have a class in Smalltalk that stores an OrderedCollection of objects. Each object has a name. I would like to iterate over the OrderedCollection objects and print out the name of each of these objects. For example, in Java I would have something like:

for(int i = 0; i < array.length; ++i) {
  System.out.println(array[i].getName());
}

This is how far I got in Smalltalk, where "list" is the OrderedCollection:

1 to: list size do: [
:x | Transcript show: 'The object name:' list at: x printString; cr.
]
  • 3
    list do: [:object | Transcript show: 'The object name: ' , object name; cr] – Leandro Caniglia Sep 27 '15 at 18:33
  • In Java, to enumerate an array foo, you'd more compactly write, for ( int i: foo ) { ... } which a little more closely mirrors the right way to do it in Smalltalk, foo do: [ :each | ... ]. – lurker Sep 28 '15 at 16:02
9

Your solution is good, except for two small mistakes: (1) you forgot some parenthesis and (2) the concatenation message #, is missing:

1 to: list size do: [
   :x | Transcript show: 'The object name:' list at: x printString; cr.
]

should have been

1 to: list size do: [
   :x | Transcript show: 'The object name:' , (list at: x) printString; cr.
]

otherwise the Transcript object would receive the message #show:at:, which it doesn't understand. Also, you have to concatenate the string 'The object name: ' with (list at: x) printString, and that's why you need the concatenation message #, in between.

Note however that in your example there is no need to use indexes. Instead of iterating from 1 to list size you could simply enumerate the objects in the list collection, like this:

list do: [:object | Transcript show: 'The object name: ' , object printString; cr]

This form is usually preferred because it avoids the use of an intermediate index (x in your example) and forces you to access the x-th element of the collection using #at:, all of which makes your code easier to read and modify.

  • 3
    +1, though I would also add that it is very typical in Smalltalk for the iteration variable to be called each, or eachSomething as appropriate, to emphasise its iterative nature, and that we are doing something for each value in the list. To be even more pedantic, I would try not to call your collection list, because it ties you to a certain collection implementation. (What if you need it to be a Set later on?) Instead, I'd recommend the OP use a pluralised noun, say, accounts, or objects, or whatever applies in your domain. – Amos M. Carpenter Sep 28 '15 at 1:13
  • 2
    Good point @AmosM.Carpenter. Generic names like list, collection and the like are only appropriate when the context makes their meaning apparent (e.g., the ivar collection of PositionableStream in Pharo.) Otherwise it is more intention revealing to use a specific noun for the elements the assortment contains. Because of this very same reason, I normally don't use each for the generic enumeration variable and say instead accounts do: [:account | <blah>]. It is anyway always valuable to help people learn folkloric conventions. – Leandro Caniglia Sep 28 '15 at 7:56
  • 2
    Get the best of both worlds, and use accounts do: [:eachAccount | <blah>]. Never hurts to be explicit, and if someone looks at a line of code that is nested a couple of levels deep, without having to look at the context, they'll know at a glance that eachAccount is the iteration variable, while account could be an instance variable or a temp. There's a good reason for that convention. :-) – Amos M. Carpenter Sep 28 '15 at 10:21

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