16

In my callback system I want to store std::function (or something else) with varying arguments.

Example:

  1. I want to call void()
  2. I want to call void(int, int)

I want 1) and 2) to be stored in the same variable and choose what to call in actuall call

FunctionPointer f0;
FunctionPointer f2;

f0();
f2(4, 5);

Is it possible to do something like this? Or I have to create several "FuntionPointer" templates based on input arguments count.

EDIT

Is it possible to utilize std::bind somehow for this task? With std::bind I can have std::function<void()> f = std::bind(test, 2, 5);

EDIT 2

Practical use case: I have a trigger system and I want to assign funtion pointers to actions, so when action happen, function is called. Pseudo-code sample:

structure Trigger 
{
   Function f;
}

Init:
  Trigger0.f = pointer to some function ()
  Trigger1.f = pointer to some function (a, b)

Input: 
  Find Trigger by input
  if (in == A) Trigger.f();
  else Trigger.f(10, 20)

or if possible

Input:
  Find Trigger by input
  if (in == A) f = bind(Trigger.f);
  else f = bind(Trigger.f, 10, 20);
  f()
4
  • 2
    C++11 variadic std::function parameter seems a close match. – Shafik Yaghmour Sep 28 '15 at 12:37
  • 1
    @ShafikYaghmour That only moves the problem to template, the variable type can not be the same and hold both functions at once. I can not make std::vector of different functions for example – Martin Perry Sep 28 '15 at 12:47
  • 1
    Can you provide an actual practical use case? Without a practical use case, answers are just throwing syntax against the wall. "Something like that" is extremely vague, and that is about as specific as you get. You then go on about bind, which is nothing like the "something like that" example. Again, a practical use case/problem to solve cuts through all that noise. That means an actual concrete problem you run into when writing software. I can think up 10 answers that might answer your question, but which one would help you depends on what you actually want to do. – Yakk - Adam Nevraumont Sep 28 '15 at 15:22
  • Please look at my latest answer. If it doesn't satisfy your needs, could you explain me why (comment under my last answer)? – jnbrq -Canberk Sönmez Sep 28 '15 at 15:48
4

Well, if you can use RTTI, you can define a MultiFuncObject like this, and you can easily bind other functions. Also, you can easily call them. But unfortunately, this approach only works for a limited number of arguments. But actually boost::bind also supports limited number of arguments (by default 9). So you can extend this class to satisfy your needs.

Before giving you the source of MultiFuncObject, I want to show you how you can use it. It takes an template argument to be used as return type. You can bind new functions with += operator. With some template magic, the class distinguishes differences between bound functions with same count of arguments with at least one different argument type.

You need C++11, because MultiFuncObject uses std::unordered_map and std::type_index.

Here is usage:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

void _1() {
  cout << "_1" << endl;
}

void _2(char x) {
  cout << "_2" << " " << x << endl;
}

void _3(int x) {
  cout << "_3" << " " << x << endl;
}

void _4(double x) {
  cout << "_4" << " " << x << endl;
}

void _5(int a, int b) {
  cout << "_5" << " " << a << " " << b << endl;
}

void _6(char a, int b) {
  cout << "_6" << " " << a << " " << b << endl;
}

void _7(int a, int b, int c) {
  cout << "_7" << " " << a << " " << b << " " << c << endl;
}

int main() {
  MultiFuncObject<void> funcs;
  funcs += &_1;
  funcs += &_2;
  funcs += &_3;
  funcs += &_4;
  funcs += &_5;
  funcs += &_6;
  funcs += &_7;
  funcs();
  funcs('a');
  funcs(56);
  funcs(5.5);
  funcs(2, 5);
  funcs('q', 6);
  funcs(1, 2, 3);
  return 0;
}

I hope this is close to what you want. Here is the source of MultiFuncObject:

#include <typeinfo>
#include <typeindex>
#include <unordered_map>

using namespace std;

template <typename R>
class MultiFuncObject {
  unordered_map<type_index, void (*)()> m_funcs;
public:

  MultiFuncObject<R> operator +=( R (* f)() ) {
    m_funcs[typeid( R() )] = (void (*)()) f;
    return *this;
  }

  template <typename A1>
  MultiFuncObject<R> operator +=( R (* f)(A1) ) {
    m_funcs[typeid( R(A1) )] = (void (*)()) f;
    return *this;
  }

  template <typename A1, typename A2>
  MultiFuncObject<R> operator +=( R (* f)(A1, A2) ) {
    m_funcs[typeid( R(A1, A2) )] = (void (*)()) f;
    return *this;
  }

  template <typename A1, typename A2, typename A3>
  MultiFuncObject<R> operator +=( R (* f)(A1, A2, A3) ) {
    m_funcs[typeid( R(A1, A2, A3) )] = (void (*)()) f;
    return *this;
  }

  R operator()() const
  {
    unordered_map<type_index, void (*)()>::const_iterator it = m_funcs.find(typeid( R() ));
    if (it != m_funcs.end()) {
      R (*f)() = ( R (*)() )(it->second);
      (*f)();
    }
  }

  template <typename A1>
  R operator()(A1 a1) const
  {
    unordered_map<type_index, void (*)()>::const_iterator it = m_funcs.find(typeid( R(A1) ));
    if (it != m_funcs.end()) {
      R (*f)(A1) = ( R (*)(A1) )(it->second);
      (*f)(a1);
    }
  }

  template <typename A1, typename A2>
  R operator()(A1 a1, A2 a2) const
  {
    unordered_map<type_index, void (*)()>::const_iterator it = m_funcs.find(typeid( R(A1, A2) ));
    if (it != m_funcs.end()) {
      R (*f)(A1, A2) = ( R (*)(A1, A2) )(it->second);
      (*f)(a1, a2);
    }
  }

  template <typename A1, typename A2, typename A3>
  R operator()(A1 a1, A2 a2, A3 a3) const
  {
    unordered_map<type_index, void (*)()>::const_iterator it = m_funcs.find(typeid( R(A1, A2, A3) ));
    if (it != m_funcs.end()) {
      R (*f)(A1, A2, A3) = ( R (*)(A1, A2, A3) )(it->second);
      (*f)(a1, a2, a3);
    }
  }

};

It stores different function prototypes using std::unordered_map with keys of std::type_index and values of void (*)(). When needed, the correct function is retrieved using that map.

Here is the working example

3
  • 1
    I have improved your solution with variadic templates and now it is almost what I wanted (only concern now is RTTI, but hey, I can live with that, since I am not having real-time app) – Martin Perry Sep 28 '15 at 16:48
  • @MartinPerry That's great! I am not familiar to variadic templates, so if you can send a link to the improved code; that would be great! :) – jnbrq -Canberk Sönmez Sep 28 '15 at 17:07
  • 2
    I have also done some measurements of performance: perry.cz/clanky/functions.html – Martin Perry Sep 29 '15 at 10:24
13

std::function<void()> and std::function<void(int, int)> are two absolutely distinct types. You need some sort of union functionality (or polymorphism) to store an object of an unknown type.

If you can use Boost, you could easily do this with boost::variant:

// Declaration:
boost::variant<std::function<void()>, std::function<void(int, int)> > f;

// Calling, explicit:
if (fContainsNullary()) {
  boost::get<std::function<void()>>(f)();
} else {
  boost::get<std::function<void(int, int)>>(f)(4, 5);
}

It is up to you to provide the logic of fContainsNullary(). Alternatively, you can use the variant's own stored knowledge of value type by using a visitor:

struct MyVisitor : boost::static_visitor<void>
{
  result_type operator() (const std::function<void()> &a) {
    a();
  }

  result_type operator() (const std::function<void(int, int)> &a) {
    a(4, 5);
  }
};

// Calling, via visitor:
boost::apply_visitor(MyVisitor(), f);

If Boost is not an option, you can hand-craft a suitable union for much the same purpose.

5

The following solution might work for you (I'm not sure that the code is absolutely correct here):

Create a wrapper for std::function with virtual destructor to enable using dynamic cast

class function_wrapper_base
{
    virtual ~function_wrapper_base();
}

template <class... Args>
class function_wrapper
    : public function_wrapper_base
{
public:
   std::function<void, Args...> f;
   ...
};

Then create a class variant_function_holder

class variant_function_holder
{
    std::unique_ptr<function_wrapper_base> f;
    ...
    template <class... Args>
    void operator()(Args&&... args)
    {
        function_wrapper<std::decay<Args>::type...> * g = dynamic_cast<function_wrapper<std::decay<Args>::type...>>(f.get());

        if (g == nullptr)
        {
            // ToDo
        }

        g->f(std::forward<Args>(args)...);
    }
};
1
  • Care: a call with a c-string literal (const char*) will fail (for the dynamic_cast) for function_wrapper<std::string>... – Jarod42 Sep 28 '15 at 16:35
4

C++11 to the rescue!

If you can generalize your function to a functor object taking no arguments, then you can call it with any lambda.

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

template <class F>
void call_it(F&& f)
{
    f();
}

int main()
{
    int x = 50, y = 75;

    call_it([] () { cout << "Hello!\n"; });
    call_it([x,y] () { cout << x << " + " << y << " = " << x + y << '\n';});


    return 0;
}
2
  • 2
    How is this different from using just std::function<void()>? – Angew is no longer proud of SO Sep 28 '15 at 13:37
  • std::function has a bit of storage overhead, that can be removed by binding directly to the closure type. The practical difference is negligible, but may be important depending on use case. – Chad Sep 28 '15 at 15:28
2

If std::function is not necessary for you, you can create a proxy class.

class fn_t {
public:
  typedef void (*fn_1_t)();
  typedef void (*fn_2_t)(int, int);
  fn_1_t fn_1;
  fn_2_t fn_2;
  fn_t operator=(fn_1_t func_1) { fn_1 = func_1; return *this; }
  fn_t operator=(fn_2_t func_2) { fn_2 = func_2; return *this; }
  void operator()() { (*fn_1)(); }
  void operator()(int a, int b) { (*fn_2)(a, b); }
};

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

void first() {
  cout << "first" << endl;
}

void second(int a, int b) {
  cout << "second " << a << " : " << b << endl;
}

int main() {
  fn_t f;
  f = &first;
  f = &second;
  f();
  f(5, 4);
  return 0;
}

Class fn_t automatically works with two prototypes you want, assigns automatically needed one, and it can call functions with both prototypes by overlading () operator with appropriate parameters.

You may want to check for validity of function pointers fn_1 and fn_2 but I didn't include this checking for minimality.

The advantage of this is that you only need C++ and not even STL and Boost.

2
  • 1
    works only for the two examples though. What if he suddenly needs 3 parameters? Or the two of different types etc.? He would need to write a big mess of a class then. – rfreytag Sep 28 '15 at 12:53
  • @pfannkuchen_gesicht I interpreted the question as this "I have two well defined function prototypes, I want to store pointers to functions with those prototypes in only one object and call them easily using one object." – jnbrq -Canberk Sönmez Sep 28 '15 at 12:58
0

The other answers are fine but I want to show my solution as well.

It's a small header with which you can "elongate" function signatures. This allows you to do this (extract from the github example):

int foo_1p(int a);
int foo_2p(int a, int b);
int foo_3p(int a, int b, int c);
int foo_4p(int a, int b, int c, int d);
int foo_5p(int a, int b, int c, int d, int e);
int foo_6p(int a, int b, int c, int d, int e, int f);
int foo_7p(int a, int b, int c, int d, int e, int f, std::string g);
...

int main()
{
   std::unordered_map<std::string, std::function<int(int, int, int, int, int, int, std::string)>> map;
   map["foo_1p"] = ex::bind(foo_1p, ph, ph, ph, ph, ph, ph);
   map["foo_2p"] = ex::bind(foo_2p, ph, ph, ph, ph, ph);
   map["foo_3p"] = ex::bind(foo_3p, ph, ph, ph, ph);
   map["foo_4p"] = ex::bind(foo_4p, ph, ph, ph);
   map["foo_5p"] = ex::bind(foo_5p, ph, ph);
   map["foo_6p"] = ex::bind(foo_6p, ph);
   map["foo_7p"] = foo_7p;

   for (const auto& f : map)
   {
       std::cout << f.first << " = " << f.second(1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, "101") << std::endl;
   }
}

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.