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I am trying to understand what happen when an assembly statement is read by the processor. The machine is Intel 8088 and the statement is

MOV AX, [100]

Assuming the data code register (CS) has the value of 0xA1B2 (16-bit), does the assembly line says that Instruction Pointer (IP) has the value of 100? Is that hex or decimal?

Assuming that the value inside [] is decimal, I will write 100 = 0x64. Then the physical address is calculated by

A1B20 + 64 = A1B84

So the processor put the 0xA1B84 on the address bus (which is 20-bit wide). Since the 8088 reads two bytes, it will put the content of 0xA1B84 and 0xA1B85 on the data bus and deliver it to the processor. Is the following figure correct? The result is 1000,0110,0011,1010 (note the MSB and LSB)

|                   |
+-------------------+
|                   |    <--   0x0A1B2 (start of CS)
+-------------------+
|                   |   
//                 //   
|                   |   
+-------------------+
| 0011     1010     |    <--   0xA1B84
+-------------------+
| 1000     0110     |
+-------------------+
| 0101     1001     |    <--   0xA1B86
+-------------------+
|                   |
//                 //
|                   | 

Another problem is that a programmer may want to use an odd offset. For example

MOV AX, [101]

Then the physical address will be A1B20 + 65 = A1B85. Then reading two bytes, Will read 1000,0110,0101,1001 (according to the above figure) and a 16-bit content from 0xA1B86. How than is justified? What is word boundary then? I mixed them up!

  • Have you read any tutorials or books describing x86 assembly language and/or x86 architecture? With mov ax, [100], the IP is an instruction pointer, so 100 is not in the IP, since that's data. In this case, address 100 decimal (as determined by the assembler you are using) is read from the data segment which is in the DS register. In other words, if the DS contains 0x1000, then this will read the word from location (0x1000 * 16) + 100(d) or address 0x10064 and put that result into AX. If you're wondering what * 16 is about, read up on the x86 architecture. – lurker Sep 28 '15 at 16:13
  • @mahmood whether the machine is Intel 8088 or 8086 isn't relevant to the question. It doesn't matter if the data arrives as two 8-bit values or as one 16-bit value. – Weather Vane Sep 28 '15 at 16:45
  • @mahmood - The x86 family of processors will read your data even if you use an unaligned address. Possibly by issuing more than one read, and discarding some bytes. For the 8088 it doesn't matter much, as it reads single bytes anyway. – Bo Persson Sep 28 '15 at 17:42
  • we can assume 100 is decimal here, but understand that assembly language is defined by the assembler, and no reason to assume that from one assembler to the next the same default assumption is used. the only thing that has to be consistent from one assembly language to the next for the same target, is the machine code matches the target. – old_timer Sep 28 '15 at 18:08
3

The instruction MOV AX, [100] has no effect on the IP register (other than the fact that IP updated to point to the following instruction after executing it as normal). The memory reference [100] is relative to the DS register not the CS register.

Reading a 16-bit value from an odd address works the same as from an even address. The first byte becomes the lower order byte of the value, the second byte becomes the higher order byte of the value.

Since the displacement in memory operands is 16 bits wide a number in the range of 0-65535 can be used. An array of up to 65536 bytes in size can accessed directly using a memory operand like this, but it's possible to access larger arrays using segment arithmetic and loading a new segment value.

  • Yes, I mixed up things.... [] is not related to CS:IP. Let me update the post and I will ask more since the odd/even addresses have not been resolved for me yet. – mahmood Sep 28 '15 at 17:06
  • @mahmood You're not allowed to change your question so that it would invalidate answers by turning it into a different question. – Ross Ridge Sep 28 '15 at 17:14
  • OK I left that intact. Please note the last line in my question. – mahmood Sep 28 '15 at 17:16
  • @mahmood The second paragraph in most post above answers the last line in your question. If you don't understand it, it would help to know what you don't understand about it. Do you know what lower order and higher order means? – Ross Ridge Sep 28 '15 at 17:35

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