In my NodeJS code I need to make 2 or 3 API calls, and each will return some data. After all API calls are complete I want to collect all the data into a single JSON object to send to the frontend.

I know how to do this using the API callbacks (the next call will happen in the previous call's callback) but this would be slow:

//1st request
request('http://www.example.com', function (err1, res1, body) {

  //2nd request
  request('http://www.example2.com', function (err2, res2, body2) {

    //combine data and do something with it

  });

});

I know you could also do something similar and neater with promises, but I think the same concept applies where the next call won't execute until the current one has finished.

Is there a way to call all functions at the same time, but for my final block of code to wait for all API calls to complete and supply data before executing?

  • You can also use bluebird if you wanted to – corvid Sep 28 '15 at 17:17
  • 2
    This is a limitation of callback based asynchronous functions. There just isn't a super clean way to do it. It's trivial with promises though. – Madara Uchiha Sep 28 '15 at 17:19
up vote 46 down vote accepted

Promises give you Promise.all() (this is true for native promises as well as library ones like bluebird's).

Update: Since Node 8, you can use util.promisify() like you would with Bluebird's .promisify()

var requestAsync = util.promisify(request); // const util = require('util')
var urls = ['url1', 'url2'];
Promise.all(urls.map(requestAsync)).then(allData => {
    // All data available here in the order of the elements in the array
});

So what you can do (native):

function requestAsync(url) {
    return new Promise(function(resolve, reject) {
        request(url, function(err, res, body) {
            if (err) { return reject(err); }
            return resolve([res, body]);
        });
    });
}
Promise.all([requestAsync('url1'), requestAsync('url2')])
    .then(function(allData) {
        // All data available here in the order it was called.
    });

If you have bluebird, this is even simpler:

var requestAsync = Promise.promisify(request);
var urls = ['url1', 'url2'];
Promise.all(urls.map(requestAsync)).then(allData => {
    // All data available here in the order of the elements in the array
});
  • I guess we cannot avoid Promise Constructor Anti-pattern here :'( – thefourtheye Sep 28 '15 at 17:30
  • 1
    @thefourtheye - it's not an anti-pattern when you're wrapping a thing that doesn't return a promise. Somebody has to make the promise. No other option unless you have a library function that does the promisifying wrapper for you. – jfriend00 Sep 28 '15 at 19:33
  • 1
    @thefourtheye You can easily make a promisify function similar to bluebird's, to hide away the ugliness. – Madara Uchiha Sep 28 '15 at 21:03
  • does request have to have a certain method sig? – SuperUberDuper Oct 1 '15 at 8:52

Sounds like async.parallel() would also do the job if you'd like to use async:

var async = require('async');

async.parallel({
    one: function(parallelCb) {
        request('http://www.example1.com', function (err, res, body) {
            parallelCb(null, {err: err, res: res, body: body});
        });
    },
    two: function(parallelCb) {
        request('http://www.example2.com', function (err, res, body) {
            parallelCb(null, {err: err, res: res, body: body});
        });
    },
    three: function(parallelCb) {
        request('http://www.example3.com', function (err, res, body) {
            parallelCb(null, {err: err, res: res, body: body});
        });
    }
}, function(err, results) {
    // results will have the results of all 3
    console.log(results.one);
    console.log(results.two);
    console.log(results.three);
});
  • Thanks Ben, you made my weekend awesome :-) – Rajeev Jayaswal Mar 12 '17 at 13:08
  • And just one question here, can we not write those parallel function one, two and three inside for loop ? – Rajeev Jayaswal Mar 12 '17 at 13:22
  • I'm not sure what you meant by inside the loop. My guess is this whole async.parallel() inside a loop? I believe It should be ok if async.each() is used instead of using native loops. – Ben Mar 20 '17 at 17:14
  • 1
    I figured it out what I needed. I was talking about async.map(handleList, findStatus, function(err, results) { ... }); where findStatus is function that will be called as many times as many items are present in handleList. – Rajeev Jayaswal Mar 21 '17 at 6:36

https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/Promise/all

Promise.all is now included with ES6 so you don't need any 3rd party libraries at all.

"Promise.all waits for all fulfillments (or the first rejection)"

I've setup a gist to demonstrate Promise.all() with refactoring itterations at: https://gist.github.com/rainabba/21bf3b741c6f9857d741b69ba8ad78b1

I'm using an IIFE (immediately involved function expression). If you're not familiar, you'll want to be for the example below though the gist shows how with using an IIFE. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Immediately-invoked_function_expression

TL;DR

( function( promises ){
    return new Promise( ( resolve, reject ) => {
        Promise.all( promises )
            .then( values => {
                console.log("resolved all promises")
                console.dir( values );
                resolve( values.reduce( (sum,value) => { return sum+value }) ); //Use Array.prototype.reduce() to sum the values in the array
            })
            .catch( err => {
                console.dir( err );
                throw err;
            });

    });
})([ 
    new Promise( ( resolve, reject ) => {
        console.log("resolving 1");
        resolve( 1 );
    }),
    new Promise( ( resolve, reject ) => {
        console.log("resolving 2");
        resolve( 2 );
    })
 ]).then( sum => { console.dir( { sum: sum } ) } )

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