6

According to the .remove() | jQuery API Documentation, it is perfectly valid to include a selector as an optional parameter to .remove(). Quote:

We can also include a selector as an optional parameter. For example, we could rewrite the previous DOM removal code as follows:

$( "div" ).remove( ".hello" );

So I've written 2 divs to test this out:

<div id="div1">test
    <div id="div2">Remove</div>
</div>

Using this as jQuery:

$( document ).ready(function() {
    $( "#div1" ).remove( "#div2" );
});

It didn't remove the div as expected. The result was:

test
Remove

Instead using:

$( document ).ready(function() {
    $("#div2").remove();
});

Removes the div as expected. So what am I missing here? Is the documentation wrong? Did I misunderstood something?

6
  • can you try this $( document ).ready(function() { $( "#div1" ).children( "#div2" ).remove(); }); ?
    – Sushil
    Sep 28, 2015 at 23:57
  • 1
    @Sushil Yes that works fine. But the question isn't about getting it to work. It's about why the documentation says it should work while it doesn't.
    – icecub
    Sep 28, 2015 at 23:58
  • i think it has something to do with using class as selector as I could not find any example with the id selector. though I maybe wrong.
    – Sushil
    Sep 29, 2015 at 0:00
  • 3
    You're interpreting it slightly incorrectly. The optional selector only works against the jQuery object. Perhaps it should be worded differently, but in essence the selector only will remove a subset of what is in the jQuery object, a removal filter if you will, it is not a 'find children and delete them' method like you are insinuating. Now since your first selector is an id, there is only one object in the first jQuery object, and then you say remove another specific id, which does not exist in the first selection, so in essence you statement does nothing
    – OJay
    Sep 29, 2015 at 0:02
  • 1
    Thanks @OJay. Great explanation! I understand why it doesn't work now.
    – icecub
    Sep 29, 2015 at 0:06

4 Answers 4

8

You're misunderstanding what the selector parameter is doing. It is filtering the first set of objects.

From the docs:

A selector expression that filters the set of matched elements to be removed.

So, your "#div2" selector doesn't exist as a part of the "#div1" element. For example, say I have the following:

<div class="red">Red</div>
<div class="red">Red</div>
<div class="red">Red</div>
<div class="red notneeded">Red</div>
<div class="red notneeded">Red</div>
<div class="red">Red</div>

Then, I call the following:

$(function () {
  $("div.red").remove(".notneeded");
});

I would be left with the following:

<div class="red">Red</div>
<div class="red">Red</div>
<div class="red">Red</div>
<div class="red">Red</div>

So, the jQuery matched set is all divs with a class of red - the second selector (".notneeded") will filter that first matched set by the ones with a class of notneeded - then it will remove them.

4

The reason your code doesn't work is that the selector is used to filter the original list ("#div1" in your case). You can't remove children like this. You have to select the children then .remove() instead:

$('#div1').children('#div2').remove() // or .find('#div2').remove() if it's nested deeper
<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/2.1.1/jquery.min.js"></script>
<div id="div1">test
    <div id="div2">Remove</div>
</div>

The place where the selector does work is when you actually filter the list, like here:

$('div').remove('.remove')
<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/2.1.1/jquery.min.js"></script>
<div id="div1" class="keep">test1</div>
<div id="div2" class="remove">test2</div>
<div id="div3" class="keep">test3</div>

0

This is the code that is not working right?

$( document ).ready(function() {
$( "#div1" ).remove( "#div2" );

});

And this is what you're trying to do?

$( "div" ).remove( ".hello" );

Try this. The code above means that it will remove all "div" tag that contains a class = "hello".

$( document ).ready(function() {
$( "div" ).remove( "#div2" );

});

1
  • I suggest reading the question again. Because you completely misunderstood it.
    – icecub
    Sep 29, 2015 at 0:10
0

A example of how .remove( [selector ] ) works:

    $('.of-these-items').remove('.these-items');

if we have:

    <ul>
       <li class="of-these-items">1</li>
       <li class="of-these-items">2</li>
       <li class="of-these-items these-items">3</li>
       <li class="of-these-items these-items">4</li>
       <li class="of-these-items">5</li>
    <ul>

"of these items, remove these items":

    <ul>
       <li class="of-these-items">1</li>
       <li class="of-these-items">2</li>
       <li class="of-these-items">5</li>
    <ul>
3
  • 2
    Thanks for posting an answer to this question! This answer is very short though and doesn't provide much context. Please explain some of the reasoning behind it, and it will become much more useful for the asker and future readers. Thanks! Sep 29, 2015 at 0:59
  • Thank you for the advice!, i just wanted to give a more semantic example Sep 29, 2015 at 3:06
  • Thanks for the example. I've removed the downvote. But I'm still missing an explanation as to why it didn't work for me in your answer. The other answers already explained it, so it's fine, but the question was about understanding the reasoning behind it.
    – icecub
    Sep 29, 2015 at 11:08

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