10

The try-catch-finally construct creates a new variable in the current scope at runtime each time the catch clause is executed where the caught exception object is assigned to a variable.

Instead of using…

var object = ['foo', 'bar'], i;  
for (i = 0, len = object.length; i <len; i++) {  
    try {  
        // do something that throws an exception 
    }  
    catch (e) {   
        // handle exception  
    } 
}

Why to use this?

var object = ['foo', 'bar'], i;  
try { 
    for (i = 0, len = object.length; i <len; i++) {  
        // do something that throws an exception 
    } 
} 
catch (e) {   
    // handle exception  
} 

Is there any case in which first option is better than the second one? When I write the code, I'm going with the feeling, but I was thinking about this recently, and I don't know what else to think. Which solution is better for what?

2
  • 8
    not the same logic, when error occurs, the first one let you to continue to loop, the second exit the loop.
    – Hacketo
    Sep 29, 2015 at 13:09
  • 2
    Your use case depends on whether you want to break the loop the first time an exception occurs, or you want to be able to clean up every iteration. Sep 29, 2015 at 13:09

3 Answers 3

15

The first one, the "for... try" construct, is best if an individual exception thrown by your object contents is not severe enough to halt your entire program. If you can go with a default value or discard the faulty information, this is the way to go.

The "try... for" construct is best if any exception thrown by your object contents should make your code fail.

1
  • Also consider in the first case many exceptions can be instanciated if you don't exit the loop in your catch, which may be a performance issue.
    – Tristan
    Feb 24, 2022 at 16:23
6

when error occurs, the first one let you to continue to loop, the second exit the loop.

That's the point of it

0
4

If you want your loop to continue processing, you would want it inside the loop. If you want to essentially skip the current iteration but continue on the next loop, you put it inside. So for example if you are processing independent tasks, then you can put it inside the loop. All of the exceptions would be shown in your logs. But if you need the previous iteration before you do the next one (eg. fibonacci sequences) then it's best you just skip the entire loop (as it would waste processing time to complete the loop throwing lots of exceptions). In the latter, it would only show you the first exception, which may be enough for you to get you on your way.

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