2

I'm trying to perform a programmatic telnet session in Java. I'm using commons-net TelnetClient, but I've also experimented with a direct socket. In either case I'm having the same problem.

I read up to "login :", then send the user name followed by CRLF. Then nothing, no other data is read, or written by server.

The telnet server is on an embedded device (a Star printer), so I'm wondering if there are some peculiar options required that I'm not setting, or that aren't supported by the commons-net TelnetClient class.

I can use Linux telnet without problems, and I can run my code against the telnet server in OSX and it works fine.

  TelnetClient client = new TelnetClient();
  client.registerNotifHandler(new TelnetNotificationHandler() {
    @Override
    public void receivedNegotiation(int negotiation_code, int option_code) {
      ALog.i(this, "negotiation code: %d, option code: %d", negotiation_code, option_code);
    }
  });
  try {
    client.addOptionHandler(new TerminalTypeOptionHandler("VT100", false, false, true, false));
    client.addOptionHandler(new SuppressGAOptionHandler(true, false, true, false));
    client.addOptionHandler(new EchoOptionHandler(true, true, true, true));
  } catch (InvalidTelnetOptionException e) {
    e.printStackTrace();
  }

  try {
    FileOutputStream fos = new FileOutputStream("/sdcard/spy.out");
    client.registerSpyStream(fos);
  } catch (FileNotFoundException e) {
    e.printStackTrace();
  }

  InputStream in = null;
  PrintWriter out = null;

  String ip = getIpAddress(p);
  ALog.i(this, "connecting to: %s", ip);
  try {
    client.connect(ip);
    in = client.getInputStream();
    out = new PrintWriter(client.getOutputStream(), true);

    if (!expect(in, "login: ", 5000)) {
      return;
    }
    if (!send(out, "root")) {
      return;
    }
    if (!expect(in, "password: ", 5000)) {
      return;
    }
    if (!send(out, "password")) {
      return;
    }

Here's the expect() and send() methods,

  protected boolean expect(InputStream in, String s, long timeout) {
    ALog.i(this, "expecting: %s", s);

    final AtomicBoolean lock = new AtomicBoolean(false);
    final ExpectThread t = new ExpectThread(in, s, lock, timeout);
    t.start();
    synchronized (lock) {
      try {
        lock.wait(timeout);
      } catch (InterruptedException e) {
      }
    }
    t.interrupt();
    return lock.get();
  }

  protected boolean send(PrintWriter out, String s) {
    out.println(s);
    out.flush();
    ALog.i(this, "sent: %s", s);
    return true;
  }

And here's ExpectThread,

  private class ExpectThread extends Thread {
    private final InputStream in;
    private final String expected;
    private final AtomicBoolean lock;
    private final long start;
    private final long timeout;

    ExpectThread(InputStream in, String expected, AtomicBoolean lock, long timeout) {
      this.in = in;
      this.expected = expected.toLowerCase();
      this.lock = lock;
      this.timeout = timeout;
      this.start = System.currentTimeMillis();
    }

    @Override
    public void run() {
      final StringBuilder b = new StringBuilder();
      final byte[] buffer = new byte[1024];
      int c;

      try {
        while (!isInterrupted() && System.currentTimeMillis() < start + timeout) {
          ALog.i(this, "starting read ...");
          while ((c = in.read(buffer)) != -1) {
            String s = new String(buffer, 0, c);
            b.append(s.toLowerCase());
            ALog.i(this, "read string: %s, buffer: %s", s, b.toString());
            if (b.toString().contains(expected)) {
              ALog.i(this, "found expected");
              lock.set(true);
              return;
            }
          }
          ALog.i(this, "waiting for read ...");
          SystemClock.sleep(1000);
        }
      } catch (IOException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
      } finally {
        synchronized (lock) {
          lock.notifyAll();
        }
      }
    }
  }

here's a wireshark pcap of the FAILED programmatic session, https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B5iST80rpTN9c1RsRTNFaE5GZHM/view?usp=sharing

here's a pcap of a successful terminal (linux telnet client) session, https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B5iST80rpTN9bDZFOHhkSHlPSE0/view?usp=sharing

I see the Linux client sends a "WILL AUTHENTICATE", where my code does not. I'd try it if I could figure out how to get TelnetClient to send such commands.

5
  • Can you show us some code?
    – Thomas
    Sep 29 '15 at 21:52
  • Trying not to make a mess of the post. I pasted the top level code. Note that I've tested this against a simple echo server I wrote and it works, so I believe there aren't any problems with the read / write code. Sep 29 '15 at 21:55
  • Check what the device is sending with a real Telnet client. Maybe for example there is no space after password:. NB you need to look up Socket.setSoTimeout(). You don't need all those threads and locks and waits.
    – user207421
    Sep 29 '15 at 22:01
  • Noted, however, that's not the problem. I can see through logging that nothing is read after I send the user name. Yes, I wanted to avoid getting to the level of tcpdump. Sep 29 '15 at 22:05
  • I would like to see a hex dump of a login/password exchange with the device using a real Telnet client.
    – user207421
    Sep 29 '15 at 23:04
3

You must send the \r\n explicitly, not via println(). It must be exactly that, not whatever println() does on your system.

I also suspect your expect() method may be reading ahead. It should read a byte or a char at a time to ensure this can't happen. And please try it with a socket read timeout instead of that Megillah of threads and locks and waits:

protected boolean expect(Socket socket, InputStream in, String expected, long timeout) throws IOException {
    ALog.i(this, "expecting: %s", s);
    long endTime = System.currentTimeMillis() + timeout;
    byte[] buffer = new byte[8192];
    StringBuffer b = new StringBuffer();
    try
    {
        while (System.currentTimeMillis() < endTime)
        {
            socket.setSoTimeout((int)(endTime - System.currentTimeMillis()));
            ALog.i(this, "starting read ...");
            int c = in.read();
            if (c == -1)
            {
                return false;
            }
              ALog.i(this, "read string: %s, buffer: %s", s, b.toString());
            b.append(Character.valueOf((char)c));
            if (b.toString().toLowerCase().contains(expected))
            {
                ALog.i(this, "found expected");
                return true;
            }
        }
        return false;
    }
    catch (SocketTimeoutException exc)
    {
        return false;
    }
}

E&OE

8
  • I've tried that. It makes no difference, e.g., out.print(s+"\r\n") Sep 29 '15 at 22:07
  • Still the right way to do it though. Don't use a PrintWriter: they swallow exceptions. Use a BufferedWriter.
    – user207421
    Sep 29 '15 at 22:09
  • I've tried that too, just OutputStream.write(). Almost all the examples I can find online use PrintWriter so that's why I switched. Sep 29 '15 at 22:10
  • Poor stuff. You should never use a PrintWriter over a network.
    – user207421
    Sep 29 '15 at 22:11
  • Yes, I've tried using single-byte read(), no difference. I can't simply remove the wait()'s. See that the lock object is used to wait until the thread is done, and it doesn't simply do a read, it loops over the read until the passed timeout expires. So unless the SO timeout is a perfect factor of the total timeout, I still need to interrupt. Regardless, like I said, I've tested this against a simple echo server and it correctly reads and writes over multiple send / expects, so I don't suspect that code. Sep 29 '15 at 22:27
0

As I suspected, it was an issue with the telnet negotiation with this particular server. I had to use a very specific echo option handler,

client.addOptionHandler(new EchoOptionHandler(false, false, false, true));

This means accept the DO ECHO that the server was sending. I discovered this discrepancy by comparing the telnet DO / WILL negotiation between the non-working and working sessions.

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