-1

Here is my code where I try to access an element of class Edge:

#include <iostream> 
// for the sort()
#include <algorithm>
#define PI 3.14159265358979323846

struct Point{
    Point(int xx, int yy): x(xx), y(yy) { }
int x;
int y;
};

// class Edge: representing lines segments of the poly-line
struct Edge{
    // constructor
    Edge(Point p0, Point p1) : start(p0), end(p1){ 
        if (p0.x == p1.x && p0.y == p1.y) throw std::invalid_argument("Edge: Identical points!"); 
    } 
    // operator< defined for the sorting by increasing ordinate of the end point
    bool operator<(const Edge& e){ return (end.y < e.end.y); }
    // data members: start point and end point of the line
Point start;
Point end;
};

static void generatePoints(vector<Point>& p){
p.push_back(Point(50,50));
p.push_back(Point(200,50));
p.push_back(Point(200,200));
p.push_back(Point(50,200));
}
//------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
int main(){

// Generate points for the poly-line
vector<Point> polyPoints;
generatePoints(polyPoints);

vector<Edge> polyEdges;
Point first = polyPoints(0);
Point last = polyPoints(polyPoints.size()-1);
polyEdges.push_back(Edge(last, first));
for (size_t i = 1; i < polyPoints.size(); ++i) polyEdges.push_back(Edge(polyPoints[i-1], polyPoints[i]));


int yCoordinate = polyEdges[i].end.y;

return 0;
}

Now, I have a vector of edges, like so:

vector<Edge> polyEdges;

and when I try to access it a specific member polyEdges[i].end.y, I get the following error message:

  'vector' : undeclared identifier
  'Point' : illegal use of this type as an expression
  see declaration of 'Point'
  'p' : undeclared identifier
  'generatePoints' : function-style initializer appears to be a function definition
  vector' : undeclared identifier
  see declaration of 'Point'
  'polyPoints' : undeclared identifier
  'Point' : illegal use of this type as an expression
  'polyPoints' : undeclared identifier
  'generatePoints': identifier not found
  'vector' : undeclared identifier
  Edge' : illegal use of this type as an expression
  see declaration of 'Edge'
  error C2088: '[' : illegal for class
  polyEdges' : undeclared identifier
  'polyPoints': identifier not found
  'polyPoints' : undeclared identifier
  left of '.size' must have class/struct/union
  'Point' : illegal use of this type as an expression
  error C2228: left of '.end' must have class/struct/union
  error C2228: left of '.y' must have class/struct/union

It must be related with the overloading of the []operator.

Question:

Should I overload [] operator and if so, how to do it?

  • 2
    Show us how you are populating polyEdges – CinCout Sep 30 '15 at 8:22
  • 6
    I don't think this has anything to do with Edge. I suspect you forgot an include and so vector here isn't the std::vector we know and love but something else that doesn't have operator[]... but that's just my best guess, need to see more code to verify – Zharf Sep 30 '15 at 8:25
  • 2
    You are using vector but haven't included <vector> or said using std::vector. – emlai Sep 30 '15 at 8:29
  • 2
    @simplicisveritatis No, you should neither post a link to all of your code nor paste all of your code here. Instead, you should post a MCVE in the question itself, as explained above. – Baum mit Augen Sep 30 '15 at 8:30
  • 2
    Alright guys, give the man his points back ;) – Zharf Sep 30 '15 at 8:51
2

Try to get some idea from this code. you no need to override [] operator. It uses the [] operator from vector class. Not from any of your class

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>

struct Point {
    int x;
    int y;
    Point(int xx, int yy) : x(xx), y(yy) { }   
};

struct Edge {
    Point start;
    Point end;
    Edge(Point p0, Point p1) : start(p0), end(p1) {
        if (p0.x == p1.x && p0.y == p1.y) {
            throw std::invalid_argument("Edge: Identical points!");
        }
    }
    bool operator<(const Edge& e) { return (end.y < e.end.y); }     
};

int main()
{    
    Point p1(0, 1);
    Point p2(2, 3);
    Edge e1(p1,p2);

    std::vector<Edge> polyEdges;
    polyEdges.push_back(e1);

    int i = 0;
    std::cout << polyEdges[i].end.y << std::endl;
    system("pause");

    //output is "3"
}
  • you were right, for some reason among the included header files there was something called vector which was hiding the omitted : #include <vector>. – Ziezi Sep 30 '15 at 12:15

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.