3

I have this CSS code:

<style>
     body {
     position:absolute;
     background-image: url(art/c11.jpg);
     width:100%;
     height:100%;
     }
</style>

As I read on the net, I expected that this would resize the background image and fit it to the browser window.

But no. I think I am obviously doing something wrong (I don't know enough CSS). Any tips?

UPDATE:

I add the hole example (not working):

<html>
<head>
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8" />
<title>No Title</title>
<style type="text/css">
     body {
     position:absolute;
     background-image:url(art/c11.jpg);
     background-size:100%;
     background-repeat: no-repeat;
     width:100%;
     height:100%;
     }
</style>
</head>
<body >
</body>
</html>
1
  • Any reason you're positioning your body element? That shouldn't be necessary, but it is usually a good idea to set body's margin and padding to 0. This normalizes some browsers quirky defaults. – jasongetsdown Jul 20 '10 at 3:21
2

If you're going to make this work cross browser, you're better off putting an image on the page and then wrap all your content in a DIV that's laid on top. E.g.

CSS

#background {
  position: fixed;
  top: 0;
  left: 0;
  width: 100%;
  height: 100%;
}

#content {
  position: relative;
  z-index: 1;
}

If you plan on supporting IE6, then add this snippet:

<!--[if IE 6]>
  <style type="text/css">
    html {
      overflow-y: hidden;
    }

    body {
      overflow-y: auto;
    }

    #background {
      position:absolute;
      z-index:-1;
    }

    #content {
      position:static;
    }
  </style>
<![endif]-->

HTML

<img id="background" src="art/c11.jpg" alt="" />

<div id="content">
  Your content
</div>

Code in action.

6

add the background-repeat property.

finished code should look like this:

     body {
     position:absolute;
     background-image: url(art/c11.jpg);
     background-size:100%;
     background-repeat: no-repeat;
     width:100%;
     height:100%;
     }
3
  • I don't know why, but neither of the examples works for me... Thanks anyway. – mRt Jul 20 '10 at 3:04
  • just updated the code with amurra's suggestion. Does it work now? – Conceited Code Jul 20 '10 at 3:06
  • background-size:100%; saves the day. – zygimantus Mar 17 '17 at 21:58
2

I dont think there is a way to stretch or control the size of a background image using CSS. However, you could use the background-position, background-attachment and background-repeat porperties to achieve an alternative result..

or you may use some JavaScript putting Image into a lower z-index layer and set the layer as you backgournd, however that is a little bit Hacking there

2

By using css3 you can achieve perspective image resize,

html { 
background: url(bg.jpg) no-repeat center center fixed; 
-webkit-background-size: cover;
-moz-background-size: cover;
-o-background-size: cover;
background-size: cover;
}

This works in all browsers and ie9+. The following filters works in ie7 and ie8 too.

filter: progid:DXImageTransform.Microsoft.AlphaImageLoader(src='.bg.jpg', sizingMethod='scale');
-ms-filter: "progid:DXImageTransform.Microsoft.AlphaImageLoader(src='bg.jpg', sizingMethod='scale')";
1

You can use the CSS3 property of background-size:100% but the support for this property is not across the board yet and won't work in older browsers. To achieve what you want you need a bunch of hacks to get it to work. There are a number of blogs like this one that will show you what you need to do. I don't recommend doing this since if you have a big image/slow connection you will see the image load. If the image isn't the best quality then it won't look good all stretched across a screen or in a different resolution.

1
  • I don't know why, but neither of the examples works for me... Thanks anyway. – mRt Jul 20 '10 at 3:05

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