27

I would like to write a *.sh script to execute multiple MySQL commands.

Currently, what I can do is something like the following

mysql -h$host -u$user -p$password -e "drop database $dbname;"
mysql -h$host -u$user -p$password -e "create database $dbname;"
mysql -h$host -u$user -p$password -e "another MySQL command"
...

Is there a way to avoid typing " mysql -h$host -u$user -p$password -e" every time I want to execute a MySQL command?

31

I think you can execute MySQL statements from a text file, for example

here is the cmds.txt file which contains MySQL commands:

select colA from TableA;
select colB from TableB;
select colC from TableC;

To execute them using shell script, type

mysql -h$host -u$user -p$password db_dbname < cmds.txt

This way, you separate your MySQL commands from your shell script.

You may want your script to display progress information to you. For this you can invoke mysql with "--verbose" option.

For more information, see https://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.6/en/mysql-batch-commands.html

3
  • All of your answers are great. I choose EricWang's answer because I think this is the most structured way of doing this job.
    – Brian
    Sep 30 '15 at 15:19
  • Can you say me if this solution executes each statement in a separate transaction?
    – Mike
    Nov 14 '17 at 13:01
  • @Mike i think yes Jul 8 '20 at 7:46
22

You can use a single multiquery:

mysql -h$host -u$user -p$password -e "drop database $dbname;create database $dbname;another MySQL command;"

Simply write all your queries seperated by ;. They will be run one after the other.

1
  • All of your answers are great. I choose EricWang's answer because I think this is the most structured way of doing this job.
    – Brian
    Sep 30 '15 at 15:20
15

Note that you can also use a HERE doc to have the queries within the same script:

mysql -h$host -u$user -p$password db_dbname <<'EOF'
select colA from TableA;
select colB from TableB;
select colC from TableC;
EOF

Note that I've used 'EOF' rather than EOF in the first line in order to prevent the contents of the script to disable parameter substitution (especially the ` can be problematic)

Also note that there should not be any whitespace before the final EOF (except if you use <<- rather than << -- in that case leading tab characters are stripped):

mysql -h$host -u$user -p$password db_dbname <<- 'EOF'
↠select colA from TableA;
↠select colB from TableB;
↠select colC from TableC;
↠EOF

(Replace the with a tab character).

For more info on the HERE doc syntax, see the bash documentation.

2
  • Thanks for the nice solution! Using bash, I was receiving an error if I put a tab character before the ending EOF but without it, all went well. Jun 12 '20 at 11:06
  • Not worked for me. i am trying on the win 10 cd C:\xampp\mysql\bin && mysql.exe -u admin -padmin123 <<'EOF' select 'IMPORT_DONE' AS IMPORT_STATUS EOF Its Saying 'EOF' is not recognized as an internal or external command, operable program or batch file.
    – Aman Deep
    Sep 11 at 7:06
11

There are several ways, in linux you have:

From the mysql cli:

mysql> source mycmds.sql

Using Pipes:

echo "SELECT ..; INSERT ..;" | mysql ...

Executing commands from a file using pipes or redirection:

cat file.sql | mysql ... OR mysql .. < file.sql
2
  • All of your answers are great. I choose EricWang's answer because I think this is the most structured way of doing this job.
    – Brian
    Sep 30 '15 at 15:19
  • The most complete answer. (It contains the answer of EricWang apart from --version for progress information.) Also using .sql as ending for SQL should be preferred over generic .txt to avooid loss of information (unless dynamic format detection is supported).
    – Radagast
    Apr 9 '17 at 20:25

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