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Howdy Slack Overflowvians.

So I came across this PostgreSQL server running 8.3.11 (yeah I know), that was in a locked state with:

ERROR:  database is not accepting commands to avoid wraparound data loss in database "postgres"
HINT:  Stop the postmaster and use a standalone backend to vacuum that database.

Normally the auto vaccum daemon (autovacuum=on), would handle this, but because the following four TOAST (allows storage of large field values 8 kB slices, like bread), database object. But the XID of this database never was reset because of these corrupt database objects.

Below is a snippet of the output when running the server in single-user mode with the admin user:

SELECT oid, relname, age(relfrozenxid) FROM pg_class WHERE relkind = 't' ORDER BY age(relfrozenxid) DESC LIMIT 4;


    ----
     1: oid = "2421459"     (typeid = 26, len = 4, typmod = -1, byval = t)
     2: relname = "pg_toast_2421456"        (typeid = 19, len = 64, typmod = -1, byval = f)
     3: age = "2146484084"  (typeid = 23, len = 4, typmod = -1, byval = t)
    ----
     1: oid = "2421450"     (typeid = 26, len = 4, typmod = -1, byval = t)
     2: relname = "pg_toast_2421447"        (typeid = 19, len = 64, typmod = -1, byval = f)
     3: age = "2146484084"  (typeid = 23, len = 4, typmod = -1, byval = t)
    ----
     1: oid = "2421435"     (typeid = 26, len = 4, typmod = -1, byval = t)
     2: relname = "pg_toast_2421432"        (typeid = 19, len = 64, typmod = -1, byval = f)
     3: age = "2146484084"  (typeid = 23, len = 4, typmod = -1, byval = t)
    ----
     1: oid = "2421426"     (typeid = 26, len = 4, typmod = -1, byval = t)
     2: relname = "pg_toast_2421423"        (typeid = 19, len = 64, typmod = -1, byval = f)
     3: age = "2146484084"  (typeid = 23, len = 4, typmod = -1, byval = t)

Notice the age is well above the vacuum_freeze_min_age (value set after a successful VACUUM), on this server and thus why it was issuing the original errors above. The above was AFTER running a VACUUM FULL; all other tables fine.

SELECT relfilenode FROM pg_class WHERE oid=2421459;

So when we looked on disk (used the pg_class.relfilenode value for each table above) the toast table's file was missing:

$ find /var/lib/pgsql/data/ -type f -name '2421426' | wc -l  # Bad toast
0

and when we looked on disk at the index of the toast

 SELECT relfilenode FROM pg_class WHERE (select reltoastidxid FROM pg_class WHERE oid=2421459)

$ find /var/lib/pgsql/data/ -type f -name '2421459' | wc -l  # Bad toast's index
0

We then tried to find the table that the bad toast record is related to with:

SELECT * FROM pg_class WHERE reltoastrelid=2421459;

got 0 results for each table above! There are no tables for the VACUUM command to reset the XID of these relations.

When we checked the pg_depend table and found that these TOAST tables have NO references:

SELECT * FROM pg_depend WHERE refobjid IN(2421459,2421450,2421435,2421426)

Question

  1. Can you delete the bad TOAST table and TOAST table indexes from the pg_class table (e.g. DELETE FROM pg_class where oid=2421459)
  2. Are there any other tables that we also need to remove the relation from?
  3. Could we just create a temp table and link it to the TOAST's index's oid?

Example for #3 above:

CREATE TABLE adoptedparent (colnameblah char(1));
UPDATE pg_class SET reltoastrelid=2421459 WHERE relname='adoptedparent';  
VACUUM FULL VERBOSE adoptedparent

EDIT:

select txid_current() is 3094769499 so these tables were corrupted a long time ago. We don't need to recover the data. We are running ext4 file system on Linux 2.6.18-238.el5. We checked the relevant lost+found/ directories and the files were not there.

  • Wonder if this would make more sense being asked in the other Slack exchange community since it is so database centric? – Yzmir Ramirez Sep 30 '15 at 19:33
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Just for the home audience, in this particular case the resolution was to edit pg_class directly. And update the server to a supported version of Postgres, of course!

Specific answers:

  1. Yes you can, although in most cases it's better to create an empty table, attach the toast relation to that table, add the pg_depend entries, and drop the table. In this case, that didn't make sense because there were truly no other objects depending on those toast tables.

    1. Usually toast tables also have an index in pg_index, and entries in pg_depend. These did not.

    2. See above.

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