28

There have been multiple instances where the compiler throws an error when I try to pass variables as arguments inside Go functions. I've been able to debug this sometimes by using a pointer in front of the variable. Both &, and * pointers seem to clear the error. Though, I'd like to understand why. I'm wondering what the difference between &, and * is, and when each should be used. Thank you!

func (ctx *NewContext) SendNotification(rw http.ResponseWriter, req *http.Request, p httprouter.Params) {

    decoder := json.NewDecoder(req.Body)

    var u User

    if err := decoder.Decode(&u); err != nil {
        http.Error(rw, "could not decode request", http.StatusBadRequest)
        return
    }
}
3
  • Logically they both serve the purpose. Think about it like this: When you pass &n into the function you are passing a copy of the memory address of n--equivalent to a pointer. If you pass *n in to the function the function gets a copy of its values, which is the memory address of n. So in that case they aren't all that different... except maybe asterisks look nicer :)
    – InkyDigits
    Oct 1, 2015 at 1:05
  • 4
    @Snowman: your comment is very confusing. You can't say they "aren't all that different" when they do functionally opposite things. The & operator references (takes the address of a value) and the * operator dereferences (takes the value at an address).
    – JimB
    Oct 1, 2015 at 14:07
  • @JimB I am simply pointing out that in the context of satisfying the arguments in the function call they aren't that different. In other contexts they are two opposite ends of the spectrum. Is any of what I said incorrect?
    – InkyDigits
    Oct 2, 2015 at 13:10

6 Answers 6

53

In your example above you defined u as type User, but not a pointer to a User. So you need the &u because the Decode function in the json package is expecting an address or pointer.

If you created the instance of User like this: u := new(User) it would be a pointer since the new function returns a pointer. You could also create a pointer to a user like this: var u *User. If you did either of those, you would have to take out the & in the call to Decode for it to work.

Pointers are basically variables that hold addresses. When you put the & in front of a variable it returns the address. The * could be read as 'redirect of'. So when you create a pointer like this:

var x *int

This can be read as x will redirect to an int. And when you assign a value to x you would give it an address like this: y := 10 x = &y

Where y is some int. So if you were to print out x, you would get the address of y, but if you printed out *x you would redirect to the what x points to which is y's value which is 10. If you were to print out &x, you would get the address of the pointer, x, itself.

If you tried to print out *y, which is just an int, not a pointer, it would throw an error because you would be redirecting with some value that is not an address to redirect to.

Run the below for some pointer fun:

package main

import "fmt"

func main() {
    var y int
    var pointerToY *int
    var pointerToPointerToInt **int

    y = 10
    pointerToY = &y
    pointerToPointerToInt = &pointerToY

    fmt.Println("y: ", y)
    fmt.Println("pointerToY: ", pointerToY)
    fmt.Println("pointerToPointerToInt: ", pointerToPointerToInt)

    fmt.Println("&y: ", &y)     // address of y
    fmt.Println("&pointerToY: ", &pointerToY)// address of pointerToY
    fmt.Println("&pointerToPointerToInt: ", &pointerToPointerToInt) // address of pointerToPointerToInt

    // fmt.Println(*y) throws an error because 
    // you can't redirect without an address.. 
    // y only has int value of 10
    fmt.Println("*pointerToY: ", *pointerToY) // gives the value of y
    fmt.Println("*pointerToPointerToInt: ", *pointerToPointerToInt)     // gives the value of pointerToY which is the address of y

    fmt.Println("**pointerToPointerToInt: ", **pointerToPointerToInt)    // this gives 10, because we are redirecting twice to get y

    if pointerToY == *pointerToPointerToInt {
        fmt.Println("'pointerToY == *pointerToPointerToInt' are the same!")
    }

    if pointerToY == &y {
        fmt.Println("'pointerToY == &y' are the same!")
    }

    if &pointerToY == pointerToPointerToInt {
        fmt.Println("'&pointerToY == pointerToPointerToInt' are the same!")
    }

    if y == **pointerToPointerToInt {
        fmt.Println("'y == **pointerToPointerToInt' are the same!")
    }

    if pointerToY == *pointerToPointerToInt {
        fmt.Println("'pointerToY == *pointerToPointerToInt' are the same!")
    }

}

Hope this helps!

1
  • 1
    Great example, although it would make it better if you included labels in the println statments.
    – mikias
    Jul 27, 2017 at 6:21
16

I will quote one smart dude:

& in front of variable name is used to retrieve the address of where this variable’s value is stored. That address is what the pointer is going to store.

* in front of a type name, means that the declared variable will store an address of another variable of that type (not a value of that type).

* in front of a variable of pointer type is used to retrieve a value stored at given address. In Go speak this is called dereferencing.

source: http://piotrzurek.net/2013/09/20/pointers-in-go.html

3

A simple example showing the code execution sequence.

   import (
        "fmt"
    )

    func main() {
        x := 0
        fmt.Println("Step 1", x)
        foo(&x)
        fmt.Println("Step 4", x)
    }

    func foo(y *int) {

        fmt.Println("Step 2", *y)
        *y = 100
        fmt.Println("Step 3", *y)
    }
/*
 Steps  Result
   1      0
   2      0
   3      100
   4      100
 */
2

pointer is used to point towards address and it stores the memory address

Adding one example to help understand pointer vs address:

Demo code

package main

import "fmt"

func main() {
    var y int
    var pointerToY *int
    var x int
    //var willThrowErrorVariable int

    y = 10
    pointerToY = &y
    //willThrowErrorVariable = &y 
    x = *pointerToY

    fmt.Println("y: ",y)
    fmt.Println("y's address using pointerToY: ",pointerToY)

    y = 4
    fmt.Println("====================================================")
    fmt.Println("Address of y after its value is changed: ",pointerToY)
    fmt.Println("value of y using pointer after its value is changed: ",*pointerToY)
    fmt.Println("Value of x after y value is changed: ",x)
}

output

y:  10
y's address using pointerToY:  0x414020
====================================================
Address of y after its value is changed:  0x414020
value of y using pointer after its value is changed:  4
Value of x after y value is changed:  10

As we can see, the value might change but the address(&) remains same and so the pointer(*) points to the value of address.

In above example,

  1. pointerToY holds the pointer to refer address of y.
  2. x holds the value which we pass to it using pointer to address of y.
  3. After changing the value of y , the x still has 10 but if we try to access the value using pointer to address (pointerToY) , we get 4
1

For this answer I will try to explain it with a variable value. A pointer can point also to a struct value.

& returns a pointer, which points to a variable value.

* reads the variable value to which the pointer is pointing.

Example:

func zero(xPointer *int) {
  *xPointer = 0
  fmt.Println(*xPointer)
}

func main() {
  x := 1
  zero(&x)
  fmt.Println(x) // x is 0
}
0

I would like to explain the concept of pointers(* and &) with an example:

Think of an example where we want to increment a variable by 1 with help of a function.

package main

import (
    "fmt"
)

func main() {
    x := 7
    fmt.Print(inc(x))
}
func inc(x int) int {
    return x + 1
}

Explanation of above: We have a function func inc(x int) int which takes an integer and returns an integer with performing an increment.

Note: Kindly pay attention that func inc(x int) int returns an int, Now what happens if we do not have a return type with that function?? This is solved by the pointer.

Look at the below code:

package main

import (
    "fmt"
)

func main() {
    x := 7
    inc(&x)
    fmt.Print(x)

}
func inc(x *int) {
    *x++
}

Explanation of the above code:

Now as our function func inc(x *int) does not have a return type we cannot get any incremented value from this function but what we can do is that we can send a location(address) to this function and tell it to increment the value at this location by one and now we can access that location from inside main() and our job is done.

A quick tip: * in front of a variable means what is stored in that variable?? and & in front of a variable means what is the internal address of that variable?

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