4

I'm a beginner-intermediate self taught Python developer,

In most of the projects I completed, I can see the following procedure repeats. I don't have any outside home code experiences, I think the below code is not so professional as it is not reusable, and seems like it is not fitting all together in a container, but loosely coupled functions on different modules.

def get_query():
    # returns the query string
    pass

def make_request(query):
    # makes and returns the request with query
    pass

def make_api_call(request):
    # calls the api and returns response
    pass

def process_response(response):
    # process the response and returns the details
    pass

def populate_database(details):
    # populates the database with the details and returns the status of population
    pass

def log_status(status):
    # logs the status so that developer knows whats happening
    pass

query = get_query()
request = make_request(query)
response = make_api_call(request)
details = process_response(response)
status = populate_database(details)
log_status(status)

How do I design this procedure as a class based design?

  • 1
    "it is not reusable" - why do you think that? A number of short, single-purpose functions is certainly more reusable than trying to combine everything into one. "loosely coupled functions on different modules" - they appear to be in the same module, and loose coupling is generally considered a good thing! – jonrsharpe Oct 1 '15 at 10:57
  • @jonrsharpe for the functions that are spread over some modules, I always find it hard to trace the module, copy code and make it work on the another project on the second project's module structure – Marty Oct 1 '15 at 10:59
  • 2
    Related, reusable functionality should probably be packaged into a single module, but beyond that it's not clear why you think there's a problem with what you have now. If you transferred it directly to classes you'd end up with "two methods, one of which is __init__". – jonrsharpe Oct 1 '15 at 11:02
  • @jonrsharpe I guess the classes are easy to maintain and call, thank you for the video. – Marty Oct 1 '15 at 11:05
  • 2
    @jonrsharpe I feel you're being a bit pedantic. There's lots of code examples where methods (such as the ones in his/her question) would be wrapped in a class. This flat file is perfectly usable as is (and I prefer it this way), but the code would be just as acceptable had it been written in a class too. – user633183 Oct 1 '15 at 16:57
5

If I understand correctly, you want these group of functions to be reused. Good approach to this would be create Abstract base class with these methods as shown below:

from abc import ABCMeta

class Generic(object):
__metaclass__  = ABCMeta


    def get_query(self):
        # returns the query string
        pass

    def make_request(self, query):
        # makes and returns the request with query
        pass

    def make_api_call(self, request):
        # calls the api and returns response
        pass

    def process_response(self, response):
        # process the response and returns the details
        pass

    def populate_database(self, details):
        # populates the database with the details and returns the status of population
        pass

    def log_status(self, status):
        # logs the status so that developer knows whats happening
        pass

Now whenever you need to use any of these methods in your project, inherit your class from this abstract class.

class SampleUsage(Generic):

    def process_data(self):
        # In any of your methods you can call these generic functions
        self.get_query()

And then you can create object to actually get results which you want.

obj = SampleUsage()
obj.process_data()
  • Metaclass for defining Abstract Base Classes – Vinod Oct 11 '15 at 18:26
6
+50

You may have several classes here. To name a few, Query, Request, Response, Database, Logger

Some of your functions may map as follows:

  1. make_query -> Query.make() constructor or class method
  2. make_request -> Request.make(query) constructor or class method
  3. make_api_call -> Request.make_api_call()
  4. process_response -> Response.process()
  5. populate_database -> Database.populate()
  6. log_status -> Logger.status Consider using logging module

You have to think about your application and design it as an interaction of cooperating objects. This is just a starting point in order for you to be partition the functionality of the application between the classes.

Some of these Classes may be Singletons, meaning they are instantiated only once at the beginning of the application and accessed everywhere else. Database and Logger fit that role.

Here is some skeleton definitions:

class Query(object):
    @classmethod
    def make(cls, *args, **kwargs):
        pass

class Request(object):
    @classmethod
    def make(cls, query):
        pass

    def make_api_call(self, *args, **kwargs):
        # possibly return Response
        pass

class Response(object):
    def process_response(self):
        pass

class Database(object):
    _the_db = None

    @classmethod
    def get_db(cls):
        # Simple man's singleton
        if not cls._the_db:
            cls._the_db = Database()
        return cls._the_db

    def populate(self):
        pass

class Logger(object):
    def log(self):   
        # consider using logging module
        pass
3

You can also save a Python file with the class name, or you can create external modules with some functions, organizing them into the modules depending on what they do. Some modules will only contain one function; others will contain a lot.

  • I find it extremely hard to manage much modules, may due to poor nomenclature. – Marty Oct 10 '15 at 20:47
  • You will find it easy when you deal with object-orientance. It is actually easier and better than doing all in a single module as unecessary functions will be loaded together when importing the master module. Try to do a hierarchy such as master module and add-on modules. – Gustavo6046 Oct 10 '15 at 21:02
  • **Oh and, more importantly, it also allows for plugins to be made as modules, even folders. _Note: I didn't understood your question in the top yet. Please be easier when making questions ;) _ – Gustavo6046 Nov 5 '15 at 18:15
  • Multiple years later, and I realize the huge mistake I had made when I assumed he didn't mean actual Object-Oriented Programming. Big whoops. – Gustavo6046 Feb 14 at 17:42
3

I think what lacks in your question is the sense of purpose. You don't switch a perfectly fine procedural code to object-oriented code without a reason. Depending on the reason, there are several ways to do it. As this problem is quite a common one, there are some common techniques that are known to work well for some common reasons.

So, let's assume you encapsulate the main procedure in an object. What are your needs?

  • Allow re-using the procedure, possibly overriding some parts? See below the template method pattern.
  • Allow dynamically altering the behavior of the procedure at runtime depending on external factors? Look into the Strategy pattern.
  • Allow dynamically altering the behavior of the procedure at runtime depending on internal factors? For example, if some request may switch the procedure into "maintenance mode"? Look into the State pattern.

I'll just describe the template method pattern, which looks the closest to Marty's concerns. I cut down the example to 3 steps so it's easier to explain, but I made you a fully working example gist.

The template method

You want to provide a way to re-use the procedure, while allowing to override some well-defined parts? Let's create an empty, fill-in-the-blanks-style template:

class BaseRequestProcesor(object):
    def get_query(self):
        raise NotImplementedError()

    def process_query(self, query):
        raise NotImplementedError()

    def log_status(self, status):
        raise NotImplementedError()

    def process(self): # main procedure
        query = self.get_query()
        status = self.process_query(query)
        self.log_status(status)

    __call__ = process # allow "calling" the requestprocessor

We have our basic template. Let's create some template fillers:

class DemoQueryReader(object):
    def get_query(self):
        return 'this is a query'

class HelloQueryProcessor(object):
    def process_query(self, query):
        return 'Hello World, {}!'.format(query)

class StdoutLogProcessor(object):
    def log_status(self, status):
        print(status)

Now build a full request processor from the bits we want. This is where the pieces comes together:

class DemonstrationProcessor(DemonQueryReader, HelloQueryProcessor, StdoutLogProcessor, BaseRequestProcessor):
    pass

Demonstrating in the console:

>>> from marty_example import DemonstrationProcessor
>>> processor = DemonstrationProcessor()
>>> processor()
Hello World, this is a query!

This is the most pedantic example you can build. You could supply default implementations when that makes sense (doing nothing, mostly). And you can group together overrides, should that make sense.

The point is, you made your process a template, allowing easy override of chosen details, while still being in control of the overall workflow. This is a form of inversion of control.

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