3

Consider the following little design:

public class Parent
{
  public event EventHandler ParentWentOut;
  public virtual void GoToWork()
  {
     ParentWentOut();
  }
}

public class Mother : Parent
{
   public override void GoToWork()
   {
     // Do some stuff here
     base.GoToWork(); // <- I don't want to write this in any derived class. 
                      //    I want base class's method to be automatically called.
   }
}

Is there any mechanism to make Parent.GoToWork method implicitly and automatically be called whenever this method finishes in overridden version of the descendants (here Mother class) ?

If there is any other language than C# able to do so, I'll be very thankful to know.

5
  • @roryap Opps ;) Nice catch
    – Hans
    Oct 1 '15 at 12:15
  • @roryap No worries. I get used to these types of reactions
    – Hans
    Oct 1 '15 at 12:16
  • 1
    out of interest, why don't you want to call base.whatever()?
    – Jay
    Oct 1 '15 at 12:20
  • @Jay Because a developer may forget to call it. If too many derived types it become a repeated line. Do you think it's not sensible?
    – Hans
    Oct 1 '15 at 12:22
  • 1
    I see. Honestly, I'd just trust the dev to call the right functions. I get the repeated line point, guess it depends if any of the solutions provided are neater. My thoughts would be they probably won't be. If it was my code, I'd just call base.
    – Jay
    Oct 1 '15 at 12:27
6

You can try to implement something like this

public class Parent
{
   public event EventHandler ParentWentOut;
   public void GoToWork()
   {
     BeforeParentWentOut();
     ParentWentOut();
     AfterParentWentOut();         
   }

   protected virtual void BeforeParentWentOut()
   {
      // Dont do anything, you can even make it abstract if it suits you
   }

   protected virtual void AfterParentWentOut()
   {
      // Dont do anything, you can even make it abstract if it suits you
   }
}



public class Mother : Parent
{
   protected override void BeforeParentWentOut()
   {
      // Do some stuff here
   }
}

Also you can subscribe to your own event on the Mother class and react to that.

EDIT: update for protected, added before/after methods to handle when to add code to the parent implementation

10
  • 3
    No, this nearly looks good - but you should make SpecificMethodForChild protected instead, so it can't be called from the outside. At that point, this is basically the template method pattern, which is absolutely fine IMO. And of course you'd want to document it carefully...
    – Jon Skeet
    Oct 1 '15 at 12:21
  • 1
    Guys, why don't you even notice that in this solution base.GoToWork never gets called?
    – Hans
    Oct 1 '15 at 12:23
  • 3
    @Hans - the point is that GoToWork is only implemented on the base method. It's always run, and then it decides when to invoke the overridable member. Oct 1 '15 at 12:25
  • 1
    You want ParentWentOut last in the GoToWork method. OP wants parent method to be called last. Just a minor correction.
    – nawfal
    Oct 1 '15 at 12:26
  • 2
    One minor problem that always remains is that anyone can do public new void GoToWork() in the derived class. But at some point you really have to ask how much you want to protect developers from themselves. I'd just document that the base implementation has to be called an be done with it. If a developer wants to shoot their foot they can always do so.
    – Joey
    Oct 1 '15 at 12:29
1

I would suggest having two methods - one for the public API and one for the internal functioning of the method.

public class Parent
{
  public event EventHandler ParentWentOut;
  public void GoToWork()
  {
     GoToWorkOverride();
     ParentWentOut();
  }

  protected virtual void GoToWorkOverride()
  {}
}

public class Mother : Parent
{
   protected override void GoToWorkOverride()
   {
       // Do some stuff here
   }
}
2
  • This is the same as Juan's answer from 11 minutes ago
    – Micky
    Oct 1 '15 at 12:28
  • His was edited to correctness based on @Jon Skeet's suggestion. Mine was right from the start i.t.o public base method calling protected virtual method (template method pattern).
    – toadflakz
    Oct 1 '15 at 12:33
0

So, far the only way to access the base class is through the base keyword which some how hold a reference to base class which is initialized by calling its constructor.

Thus your answer is no.

2
  • Any language capable of this?
    – Hans
    Oct 1 '15 at 12:15
  • I havent seen any language to support what want just yet.
    – SHM
    Oct 1 '15 at 12:16

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