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I have a program that returns an error after I've compiled, then run it in g++. I know because when I test this code in Visual Studio that this error is occuring when I try to set a new nodes data pointer equal to something. More specifically, when I try to set n->data = ch; Visual Studio breaks (stops) at that line of code. For context, here's part of my header file (with n->data = ch; towards the end):

#include <ostream>

class LinkedList
{
public:
        LinkedList();
        ~LinkedList();

        void add(char ch);
private:
    struct node
    {
            node();
            char data;
            node * next;
    };
    node * head;
    node * curr;
    node * prev;
};
LinkedList::LinkedList() : head(nullptr), curr(nullptr), prev(nullptr);
LinkedList::node::node() : data('\0'), next(nullptr);
LinkedList::~LinkedList()
{
    if (!head) // head is null and so list is empty
    {
            return; //nothing to delete
    }

    for(curr = head; head; /* head isn't NULL*/ delete curr /*delete first element*/)
    {
            curr = head;  // set curr to head of list
            head = curr->next;  // move head over to next element (or make it null)
    }
}
void LinkedList::add(char ch)
{
    node * n = nullptr;
    n->next = nullptr; //my compiler doesn't like this
    n->data = ch; // or this
    //irrelevant code after this.
}

I wish I could give you guys more context, but I'm clueless as to why this isn't working. Even if it does have something to do with C strings, I don't know what to do to fix this.

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  • 2
    The compiler does not throw errors. – barak manos Oct 1 '15 at 17:39
  • 2
    You probably want to replace node * n = nullptr; with node * n = new node; (and store n somewhere) – Piotr Skotnicki Oct 1 '15 at 17:39
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    You have to make a pointer actually point to something before you dereference it. – David Schwartz Oct 1 '15 at 17:42
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    Please clarify exactly what you mean by "My compiler is throwing an error when I try to set a new nodes data pointer equal to something." and "the compiler freaks". Do you really mean that compilation fails? Or do you mean that it compiles, but doesn't behave as you expect when you run the result? – Jon Skeet Oct 1 '15 at 17:44
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    @Jon Skeet It compiles but doesn't behave as I expect. – Logan Kling Oct 1 '15 at 18:11
3
void LinkedList::add(char ch)
{
    node * n = nullptr; // ##
    n->next = nullptr; //my compiler doesn't like this
    n->data = ch; // or this

    ...

In the first line (marked as ##), you define a pointer to a node, and initialize it to nullptr, so the pointer actually points to "nothing".

As a consequence of that, you cannot set values for the node data structure fields (n->next and n->data) using that pointer, since it's pointing to nothing as per previous line.

What you could do to fix that is to create an instance of a new node (for example using new), and then prepare the fields of that instance, using n->next and n->data.

5
  • 1
    I would need to delete n at the end of that function then, right? – Logan Kling Oct 1 '15 at 17:48
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    @LarryK: Actually, if you are implemented a linked-list class, you may want to chain the newly created node to the remaining part of the list. The right place to delete the list's nodes is in the destructor (~LinkedList). – Mr.C64 Oct 1 '15 at 17:55
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    Is my deconstructor now, sufficient? Should I change it if I don't want a memory leak? – Logan Kling Oct 1 '15 at 18:13
  • @LarryK: I'm sorry I don't have the bandwidth right now to double-check your destructor code. You may want to debug it by yourself, to check if it properly releases every node. However, at a first glance, it seems correct. – Mr.C64 Oct 1 '15 at 18:29
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    Thank you, I just wanted to make sure that there weren't any major errors with my debugger. – Logan Kling Oct 1 '15 at 18:45
2

As your code

node * n = nullptr;

says assign null pointer to n then you dereferencing that null pointer by

 n->next = nullptr;

So, it cause Segmentation fault.

To solve use

node * n = new node();
n->next = nullptr;
n->data = ch;
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  • @NathanOliver, actually he said '//irrelevant code after this.', so we may assume he might done that things. – ashiquzzaman33 Oct 1 '15 at 18:04

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