3

I'm a CS freshman and I find the division way of finding a binary number to be a pain. Is it possible to use log to quickly find 24, for instance, in binary?

  • Logarithms apply to numbers - the base in which they are written is irrelevant (e.g. log(1111b) = log(15) = log(0xF)). Think about how you might convert an arbitrary number into decimal. – Wai Ha Lee Oct 1 '15 at 22:08
8

If you want to use logarithms, you can.


Define log2(b) as log(b) / log(2) or ln(b) / ln(2) (they are the same).

Repeat the following:

  • Define n as the integer part of log2(b). There is a 1 in the nth position in the binary representation of b.

  • Set b = b - 2n

  • Repeat first step until b = 0.


Worked example: Converting 2835 to binary

  • log2(2835) = 11.47.. => n = 11

    The binary representation has a 1 in the 211 position.

  • 2835 - (211 = 2048) = 787

    log2(787) = 9.62... => n = 9

    The binary representation has a 1 in the 29 position.

  • 787 - (29 = 512) = 275

    log2(275) = 8.10... => n = 8

    The binary representation has a 1 in the 28 position.

  • 275 - (28 = 256) = 19

    log2(19) = 4.25... => n = 4

    The binary representation has a 1 in the 24 position.

  • 19 - (24 = 16) = 3

    log2(3) = 1.58.. => n = 1

    The binary representation has a 1 in the 21 position.

  • 3 - (21 = 2) = 1

    log2(1) = 0 => n = 0

    The binary representation has a 1 in the 20 position.

We know the binary representation has 1s in the 211, 29, 28, 24, 21, and 20 positions:

2^     11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
binary  1  0 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 1

so the binary representation of 2835 is 101100010011.

| improve this answer | |
  • I reread your question and saw you wanted 24 in binary. Using the same principle, you'd get 2^4 and 2^3, giving you 24 = 11000b. – Wai Ha Lee Oct 2 '15 at 7:05
  • 1
    I started thinking about this today as a faster way to convert to binary. Found your answer very helpful. Glad to see I was on the right track. – richbai90 Jan 26 '17 at 17:15
1

From a CS perspective, binary is quite easy because you usually only need to go up to 255. Or 15 if using HEX notation. The more you use it, the easier it gets.

How I do it on the fly, is by remembering all the 2 powers up to 128 and including 1. (The presence of the 1 instead of 1.4xxx possibly means that you can't use logs).

128,64,32,16,8,4,2,1

Then I use the rule that if the number is bigger than each power in descending order, that is a '1' and subtract it, else it's a '0'.

So 163

163 >= 128 = '1' R 35
35  !>= 64 = '0'
35  >= 32  = '1' R 3
3   !>= 16 = '0'
3   !>= 8  = '0'
3   !>= 4  = '0'
3   >=  2  = '1' R 1
1   >=  1  = '1' R 0

163 = 10100011.

It may not be the most elegant method, but when you just need to convert something ad-hoc thinking of it as comparison and subtraction may be easier than division.

| improve this answer | |
0

Yes, you have to loop through 0 -> power which is bigger than you need and then take the remainder and do the same, which is a pain too.

I would suggest you trying recursion approach of division called 'Divide and Conquer'.

http://web.stanford.edu/class/archive/cs/cs161/cs161.1138/lectures/05/Small05.pdf

But again, since you need a binary representation, I guess unless you use ready utils, division approach is the simplest one IMHO.

| improve this answer | |

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.