192

I have some kind of test data and want to create a unit test for each item. My first idea was to do it like this:

import unittest

l = [["foo", "a", "a",], ["bar", "a", "b"], ["lee", "b", "b"]]

class TestSequence(unittest.TestCase):
    def testsample(self):
        for name, a,b in l:
            print "test", name
            self.assertEqual(a,b)

if __name__ == '__main__':
    unittest.main()

The downside of this is that it handles all data in one test. I would like to generate one test for each item on the fly. Any suggestions?

22 Answers 22

138

i use something like this:

import unittest

l = [["foo", "a", "a",], ["bar", "a", "b"], ["lee", "b", "b"]]

class TestSequense(unittest.TestCase):
    pass

def test_generator(a, b):
    def test(self):
        self.assertEqual(a,b)
    return test

if __name__ == '__main__':
    for t in l:
        test_name = 'test_%s' % t[0]
        test = test_generator(t[1], t[2])
        setattr(TestSequense, test_name, test)
    unittest.main()

The parameterized package can be used to automate this process:

from parameterized import parameterized

class TestSequence(unittest.TestCase):
    @parameterized.expand([
        ["foo", "a", "a",],
        ["bar", "a", "b"],
        ["lee", "b", "b"],
    ])
    def test_sequence(self, name, a, b):
        self.assertEqual(a,b)

Which will generate the tests:

test_sequence_0_foo (__main__.TestSequence) ... ok
test_sequence_1_bar (__main__.TestSequence) ... FAIL
test_sequence_2_lee (__main__.TestSequence) ... ok

======================================================================
FAIL: test_sequence_1_bar (__main__.TestSequence)
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "/usr/local/lib/python2.7/site-packages/parameterized/parameterized.py", line 233, in <lambda>
    standalone_func = lambda *a: func(*(a + p.args), **p.kwargs)
  File "x.py", line 12, in test_sequence
    self.assertEqual(a,b)
AssertionError: 'a' != 'b'
  • 23
    Actually, bignose, this code DOES generate a different name for each test (it actually wouldn't work otherwise). In the example given the tests executed will be named "test_foo", "test_bar", and "test_lee" respectively. Thus the benefit you mention (and it is a big one) is preserved as long as you generate sensible names. – Toji Feb 23 '11 at 16:52
  • 1
    As the answer given by @codeape states, nose handles this. However, nose does not seem to handle Unicode; therefore for me this is a preferable solution. +1 – Keith Pinson Aug 13 '11 at 20:42
  • 5
    So note, that more proper answer is given in the duplicate question: stackoverflow.com/a/2799009/322020 - you have use to .__name__ = to enable .exact_method testing – Nakilon Apr 12 '13 at 10:38
  • 7
    Why does the code modifying the class appear in the if __name__ == '__main__' conditional? Surely it should go outside this to run at import time (remembering that python modules are only imported once even if imported from several different places) – SpoonMeiser Dec 21 '13 at 0:52
  • 4
    I don't think this is a good solution. The code of a unittest should not depend on the way it gets called. The TestCase should be useable in nose or pytest or a different test environment. – guettli Apr 29 '14 at 12:21
103

Using unittest (since 3.4)

Since Python 3.4, the standard library unittest package has the subTest context manager.

See the documentation:

Example:

from unittest import TestCase

param_list = [('a', 'a'), ('a', 'b'), ('b', 'b')]

class TestDemonstrateSubtest(TestCase):
    def test_works_as_expected(self):
        for p1, p2 in param_list:
            with self.subTest():
                self.assertEqual(p1, p2)

You can also specify a custom message and parameter values to subTest():

with self.subTest(msg="Checking if p1 equals p2", p1=p1, p2=p2):

Using nose

The nose testing framework supports this.

Example (the code below is the entire contents of the file containing the test):

param_list = [('a', 'a'), ('a', 'b'), ('b', 'b')]

def test_generator():
    for params in param_list:
        yield check_em, params[0], params[1]

def check_em(a, b):
    assert a == b

The output of the nosetests command:

> nosetests -v
testgen.test_generator('a', 'a') ... ok
testgen.test_generator('a', 'b') ... FAIL
testgen.test_generator('b', 'b') ... ok

======================================================================
FAIL: testgen.test_generator('a', 'b')
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "/usr/lib/python2.5/site-packages/nose-0.10.1-py2.5.egg/nose/case.py", line 203, in runTest
    self.test(*self.arg)
  File "testgen.py", line 7, in check_em
    assert a == b
AssertionError

----------------------------------------------------------------------
Ran 3 tests in 0.006s

FAILED (failures=1)
  • 3
    That's a very clean way to dynamically generate test cases. – gaborous Jul 29 '15 at 19:11
  • But be aware, 'setup()' will not know what variables are being used as arguments to yield. Actually setup() won't know what test is running, or vars set inside test_generator(). This complicates sanity checking within setup(), and it's one of the reasons that some folks prefer py.test. – Crossfit_and_Beer Jan 29 '16 at 21:30
  • 1
    Upvoted for the update section. Exactly what I needed. :) – Saurabh Shrivastava Jun 25 '18 at 12:04
  • 1
    Is there a way to run the unittest version with pytest, so that it would run all the cases and not stop on the first failed parameter? – kakk11 Apr 24 at 17:13
  • 1
    As mentioned by @kakk11, this answer (and subTest in general) does not work with pytest. This is a known issue. There is an actively developed plugin to make this work: github.com/pytest-dev/pytest-subtests – Jérémie yesterday
63

This can be solved elegantly using Metaclasses:

import unittest

l = [["foo", "a", "a",], ["bar", "a", "b"], ["lee", "b", "b"]]

class TestSequenceMeta(type):
    def __new__(mcs, name, bases, dict):

        def gen_test(a, b):
            def test(self):
                self.assertEqual(a, b)
            return test

        for tname, a, b in l:
            test_name = "test_%s" % tname
            dict[test_name] = gen_test(a,b)
        return type.__new__(mcs, name, bases, dict)

class TestSequence(unittest.TestCase):
    __metaclass__ = TestSequenceMeta

if __name__ == '__main__':
    unittest.main()
  • 1
    This worked GREAT for me with Selenium. As a note, in the class TestSequence, you can define "static" methods like setUp(self), is_element_present(self, how, what), ... tearDown(self). Putting them AFTER the "metaclass = TestSequenceMeta" statement seems to work. – Love and peace - Joe Codeswell Sep 8 '15 at 23:37
  • 2
    This solution is better than the one selected as accepted IMHO. – petroslamb Jan 18 '16 at 13:42
  • 1
    Can you perhaps clarify why this does not work when just overriding __new__ from TestSequence class (and thus skip the metaclass altogether)? – petroslamb Jan 18 '16 at 13:50
  • 1
    @petroslamb The __new__ method in the metaclass gets called when the class itself is defined, not when the first instance is created. I would imagine this method of dynamically creating test methods is more compatible with the introspection used by unittest to determine how many tests are in a class (i.e. it may compile the list of tests before it ever creates an instance of that class). – BillyBBone Feb 23 '16 at 4:20
  • 7
    Note: in python 3, change this to: class TestSequence(unittest.TestCase, metaclass=TestSequenceMeta):[...] – Mathieu_Du Dec 30 '16 at 18:40
42

As of Python 3.4 subtests have been introduced to unittest for this purpose. See the documentation for details. TestCase.subTest is a context manager which allows one to isolate asserts in a test so that a failure will be reported with parameter information but does not stop the test execution. Here's the example from the documentation:

class NumbersTest(unittest.TestCase):

def test_even(self):
    """
    Test that numbers between 0 and 5 are all even.
    """
    for i in range(0, 6):
        with self.subTest(i=i):
            self.assertEqual(i % 2, 0)

The output of a test run would be:

======================================================================
FAIL: test_even (__main__.NumbersTest) (i=1)
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "subtests.py", line 32, in test_even
    self.assertEqual(i % 2, 0)
AssertionError: 1 != 0

======================================================================
FAIL: test_even (__main__.NumbersTest) (i=3)
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "subtests.py", line 32, in test_even
    self.assertEqual(i % 2, 0)
AssertionError: 1 != 0

======================================================================
FAIL: test_even (__main__.NumbersTest) (i=5)
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "subtests.py", line 32, in test_even
    self.assertEqual(i % 2, 0)
AssertionError: 1 != 0

This is also part of unittest2, so it is available for earlier versions of Python.

  • 1
    The best solution if you use python 3.4 and higher. – Max Malysh Dec 20 '15 at 14:14
  • 4
    Using unittest2, this is also available for Python 2.7. – Bernhard Mar 25 '16 at 16:21
  • 9
    One major difference between this approach and having separate tests is that the test state isn't reset each time. (That is, setUp() and tearDown() aren't run between the sub-tests.) – Kevin Christopher Henry Apr 9 '16 at 15:16
  • 1
    @KevinChristopherHenry Yes, but self.setUp() can in theory be called manually from within the subtest. As for tearDown, having it called automatically at the end might suffice. – A-B-B May 1 '17 at 20:33
32

load_tests is a little known mechanism introduced in 2.7 to dynamically create a TestSuite. With it, you can easily create parametrized tests.

For example:

import unittest

class GeneralTestCase(unittest.TestCase):
    def __init__(self, methodName, param1=None, param2=None):
        super(GeneralTestCase, self).__init__(methodName)

        self.param1 = param1
        self.param2 = param2

    def runTest(self):
        pass  # Test that depends on param 1 and 2.


def load_tests(loader, tests, pattern):
    test_cases = unittest.TestSuite()
    for p1, p2 in [(1, 2), (3, 4)]:
        test_cases.addTest(GeneralTestCase('runTest', p1, p2))
    return test_cases

That code will run all the TestCases in the TestSuite returned by load_tests. No other tests are automatically run by the discovery mechanism.

Alternatively, you can also use inheritance as shown in this ticket: http://bugs.python.org/msg151444

  • 1
    The code above fails: TypeError: __init__() takes at most 2 arguments (4 given) – max Nov 17 '15 at 5:31
  • 2
    Added null defaults to the constructor extra parameters. – Javier Nov 24 '15 at 1:56
  • I prefer the nose-parameterize code in @mojo's answer, but for my clients it's just too useful to avoid an extra dependency so I'll be using this for them. – sage Mar 19 '16 at 15:55
  • The client is always right! :p – Javier Mar 21 '16 at 14:14
  • 1
    bonus: ability to redefine shortDescription method for output passed in params – fun_vit Feb 14 '18 at 10:30
28

It can be done by using pytest. Just write the file test_me.py with content:

import pytest

@pytest.mark.parametrize('name, left, right', [['foo', 'a', 'a'],
                                               ['bar', 'a', 'b'],
                                               ['baz', 'b', 'b']])
def test_me(name, left, right):
    assert left == right, name

And run your test with command py.test --tb=short test_me.py. Then the output will be looks like:

=========================== test session starts ============================
platform darwin -- Python 2.7.6 -- py-1.4.23 -- pytest-2.6.1
collected 3 items

test_me.py .F.

================================= FAILURES =================================
_____________________________ test_me[bar-a-b] _____________________________
test_me.py:8: in test_me
    assert left == right, name
E   AssertionError: bar
==================== 1 failed, 2 passed in 0.01 seconds ====================

It simple!. Also pytest has more features like fixtures, mark, assert, etc ...

  • I was looking for a simple, straight forward example how to parametrize test cases with py.test. Thank you very much! – timgeb Mar 25 '16 at 15:13
  • @timgeb I'm glad to help you. Check py.test tag, for more examples. Also I suggest to use hamcrest for adding some sugar into your asserts with human readable mutchers, which can be modified, combined or created by your own way. Plus we have allure-python, a nice looking report generation for py.test – Sergey Voronezhskiy Mar 25 '16 at 15:55
  • Thanks. I just started moving from unittest to py.test. I used to have TestCase base classes that were able to dynamically create children with different arguments which they would store as class variables... which was a bit unwieldy. – timgeb Mar 25 '16 at 15:57
  • 1
    @timgeb Yep you are right. The most killer feature of py.test is yield_fixtures. Which can do setup, return some useful data into test and after test ends make teardown. Fixtures can also be parametirized. – Sergey Voronezhskiy Mar 25 '16 at 16:08
9

Use the ddt library. It adds simple decorators for the test methods:

import unittest
from ddt import ddt, data
from mycode import larger_than_two

@ddt
class FooTestCase(unittest.TestCase):

    @data(3, 4, 12, 23)
    def test_larger_than_two(self, value):
        self.assertTrue(larger_than_two(value))

    @data(1, -3, 2, 0)
    def test_not_larger_than_two(self, value):
        self.assertFalse(larger_than_two(value))

This library can be installed with pip. It doesn't require nose, and works excellent with the standard library unittest module.

6

You would benefit from trying the TestScenarios library.

testscenarios provides clean dependency injection for python unittest style tests. This can be used for interface testing (testing many implementations via a single test suite) or for classic dependency injection (provide tests with dependencies externally to the test code itself, allowing easy testing in different situations).

5

There's also Hypothesis which adds fuzz or property based testing: https://pypi.python.org/pypi/hypothesis

This is a very powerful testing method.

4

You can use nose-ittr plugin (pip install nose-ittr).

It's very easy to integrate with existing tests, minimal changes (if any) are required. It also supports nose multiprocessing plugin.

Not that you can also have a customize setup function per test.

@ittr(number=[1, 2, 3, 4])   
def test_even(self):   
    assert_equal(self.number % 2, 0)

It is also possible to pass nosetest parameters like with their build-in plugin attrib, this way you can run only a specific test with specific parameter:

nosetest -a number=2
  • I like this approach, especially the per method level it supports. – Matt Mar 6 '15 at 1:29
2

I came across ParamUnittest the other day when looking at the source code to radon (example usage on the github repo). It should work with other frameworks that extend TestCase (like Nose).

Here is an example:

import unittest
import paramunittest


@paramunittest.parametrized(
    ('1', '2'),
    #(4, 3),    <---- uncomment to have a failing test
    ('2', '3'),
    (('4', ), {'b': '5'}),
    ((), {'a': 5, 'b': 6}),
    {'a': 5, 'b': 6},
)
class TestBar(TestCase):
    def setParameters(self, a, b):
        self.a = a
        self.b = b

    def testLess(self):
        self.assertLess(self.a, self.b)
2

I use metaclasses and decorators for generate tests. You can check my implementation python_wrap_cases. This library doesn't require any test frameworks.

Your example:

import unittest
from python_wrap_cases import wrap_case


@wrap_case
class TestSequence(unittest.TestCase):

    @wrap_case("foo", "a", "a")
    @wrap_case("bar", "a", "b")
    @wrap_case("lee", "b", "b")
    def testsample(self, name, a, b):
        print "test", name
        self.assertEqual(a, b)

Console output:

testsample_u'bar'_u'a'_u'b' (tests.example.test_stackoverflow.TestSequence) ... test bar
FAIL
testsample_u'foo'_u'a'_u'a' (tests.example.test_stackoverflow.TestSequence) ... test foo
ok
testsample_u'lee'_u'b'_u'b' (tests.example.test_stackoverflow.TestSequence) ... test lee
ok

Also you may use generators. For example this code generate all possible combinations of tests with arguments a__list and b__list

import unittest
from python_wrap_cases import wrap_case


@wrap_case
class TestSequence(unittest.TestCase):

    @wrap_case(a__list=["a", "b"], b__list=["a", "b"])
    def testsample(self, a, b):
        self.assertEqual(a, b)

Console output:

testsample_a(u'a')_b(u'a') (tests.example.test_stackoverflow.TestSequence) ... ok
testsample_a(u'a')_b(u'b') (tests.example.test_stackoverflow.TestSequence) ... FAIL
testsample_a(u'b')_b(u'a') (tests.example.test_stackoverflow.TestSequence) ... FAIL
testsample_a(u'b')_b(u'b') (tests.example.test_stackoverflow.TestSequence) ... ok
1

Just use metaclasses, as seen here;

class DocTestMeta(type):
    """
    Test functions are generated in metaclass due to the way some
    test loaders work. For example, setupClass() won't get called
    unless there are other existing test methods, and will also
    prevent unit test loader logic being called before the test
    methods have been defined.
    """
    def __init__(self, name, bases, attrs):
        super(DocTestMeta, self).__init__(name, bases, attrs)

    def __new__(cls, name, bases, attrs):
        def func(self):
            """Inner test method goes here"""
            self.assertTrue(1)

        func.__name__ = 'test_sample'
        attrs[func.__name__] = func
        return super(DocTestMeta, cls).__new__(cls, name, bases, attrs)

class ExampleTestCase(TestCase):
    """Our example test case, with no methods defined"""
    __metaclass__ = DocTestMeta

Output:

test_sample (ExampleTestCase) ... OK
1
import unittest

def generator(test_class, a, b):
    def test(self):
        self.assertEqual(a, b)
    return test

def add_test_methods(test_class):
    #First element of list is variable "a", then variable "b", then name of test case that will be used as suffix.
    test_list = [[2,3, 'one'], [5,5, 'two'], [0,0, 'three']]
    for case in test_list:
        test = generator(test_class, case[0], case[1])
        setattr(test_class, "test_%s" % case[2], test)


class TestAuto(unittest.TestCase):
    def setUp(self):
        print 'Setup'
        pass

    def tearDown(self):
        print 'TearDown'
        pass

_add_test_methods(TestAuto)  # It's better to start with underscore so it is not detected as a test itself

if __name__ == '__main__':
    unittest.main(verbosity=1)

RESULT:

>>> 
Setup
FTearDown
Setup
TearDown
.Setup
TearDown
.
======================================================================
FAIL: test_one (__main__.TestAuto)
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "D:/inchowar/Desktop/PyTrash/test_auto_3.py", line 5, in test
    self.assertEqual(a, b)
AssertionError: 2 != 3

----------------------------------------------------------------------
Ran 3 tests in 0.019s

FAILED (failures=1)
  • 1
    Minor problem with your def add_test_methods function. Should be def _add_test_methods I think – Raychaser Jan 13 '17 at 19:12
  • @Raychaser...You are correct..I fixed that but did not update it here....Thanks for catching that. – Arindam Roychowdhury Jan 16 '17 at 10:45
1

You can use TestSuite and custom TestCase classes.

import unittest

class CustomTest(unittest.TestCase):
    def __init__(self, name, a, b):
        super().__init__()
        self.name = name
        self.a = a
        self.b = b

    def runTest(self):
        print("test", self.name)
        self.assertEqual(self.a, self.b)

if __name__ == '__main__':
    suite = unittest.TestSuite()
    suite.addTest(CustomTest("Foo", 1337, 1337))
    suite.addTest(CustomTest("Bar", 0xDEAD, 0xC0DE))
    unittest.TextTestRunner().run(suite)
  • While the TestSuite works, the arguments are not passed down to __init__ function. – jadelord Aug 2 '17 at 19:42
0

I'd been having trouble with a very particular style of parameterized tests. All our Selenium tests can run locally, but they also should be able to be run remotely against several platforms on SauceLabs. Basically, I wanted to take a large amount of already-written test cases and parameterize them with the fewest changes to code possible. Furthermore, I needed to be able to pass the parameters into the setUp method, something which I haven't seen any solutions for elsewhere.

Here's what I've come up with:

import inspect
import types

test_platforms = [
    {'browserName': "internet explorer", 'platform': "Windows 7", 'version': "10.0"},
    {'browserName': "internet explorer", 'platform': "Windows 7", 'version': "11.0"},
    {'browserName': "firefox", 'platform': "Linux", 'version': "43.0"},
]


def sauce_labs():
    def wrapper(cls):
        return test_on_platforms(cls)
    return wrapper


def test_on_platforms(base_class):
    for name, function in inspect.getmembers(base_class, inspect.isfunction):
        if name.startswith('test_'):
            for platform in test_platforms:
                new_name = '_'.join(list([name, ''.join(platform['browserName'].title().split()), platform['version']]))
                new_function = types.FunctionType(function.__code__, function.__globals__, new_name,
                                                  function.__defaults__, function.__closure__)
                setattr(new_function, 'platform', platform)
                setattr(base_class, new_name, new_function)
            delattr(base_class, name)

    return base_class

With this, all I had to do was add a simple decorator @sauce_labs() to each regular old TestCase, and now when running them, they're wrapped up and rewritten, so that all the test methods are parameterized and renamed. LoginTests.test_login(self) runs as LoginTests.test_login_internet_explorer_10.0(self), LoginTests.test_login_internet_explorer_11.0(self), and LoginTests.test_login_firefox_43.0(self), and each one has the parameter self.platform to decide what browser/platform to run against, even in LoginTests.setUp, which is crucial for my task since that's where the connection to SauceLabs is initialized.

Anyway, I hope this might be of help to someone looking to do a similar "global" parameterization of their tests!

0

This solution works with unittest and nose:

#!/usr/bin/env python
import unittest

def make_function(description, a, b):
    def ghost(self):
        self.assertEqual(a, b, description)
    print description
    ghost.__name__ = 'test_{0}'.format(description)
    return ghost


class TestsContainer(unittest.TestCase):
    pass

testsmap = {
    'foo': [1, 1],
    'bar': [1, 2],
    'baz': [5, 5]}

def generator():
    for name, params in testsmap.iteritems():
        test_func = make_function(name, params[0], params[1])
        setattr(TestsContainer, 'test_{0}'.format(name), test_func)

generator()

if __name__ == '__main__':
    unittest.main()
0

The metaclass-based answers still work in Python3, but instead of the __metaclass__ attribute one has to use the metaclass parameter, as in:

class ExampleTestCase(TestCase,metaclass=DocTestMeta):
    pass
0

Meta-programming is fun, but can get on the way. Most solutions here make it difficult to:

  • selectively launch a test
  • point back to the code given test's name

So, my first suggestion is to follow the simple/explicit path (works with any test runner):

import unittest

class TestSequence(unittest.TestCase):

    def _test_complex_property(self, a, b):
        self.assertEqual(a,b)

    def test_foo(self):
        self._test_complex_property("a", "a")
    def test_bar(self):
        self._test_complex_property("a", "b")
    def test_lee(self):
        self._test_complex_property("b", "b")

if __name__ == '__main__':
    unittest.main()

Since we shouldn't repeat ourselves, my second suggestion builds on @Javier's answer: embrace property based testing. Hypothesis library:

  • is "more relentlessly devious about test case generation than us mere humans"
  • will provide simple count-examples
  • works with any test runner
  • has many more interesting features (statistics, additional test output, ...)

    class TestSequence(unittest.TestCase):

    @given(st.text(), st.text())
    def test_complex_property(self, a, b):
        self.assertEqual(a,b)
    

To test your specific examples, just add:

    @example("a", "a")
    @example("a", "b")
    @example("b", "b")

To run only one particular example, you can comment out the other examples (provided example will be run first). You may want to use @given(st.nothing()). Another option is to replace the whole block by:

    @given(st.just("a"), st.just("b"))

Ok, you don't have distinct test names. But maybe you just need:

  • a descriptive name of the property under test.
  • which input leads to failure (falsifying example).

Funnier example

0

Super late to the party, but I had trouble making these work for setUpClass.

Here's a version of @Javier's answer that gives setUpClass access to dynamically allocated attributes.

import unittest


class GeneralTestCase(unittest.TestCase):
    @classmethod
    def setUpClass(cls):
        print ''
        print cls.p1
        print cls.p2

    def runTest1(self):
        self.assertTrue((self.p2 - self.p1) == 1)

    def runTest2(self):
        self.assertFalse((self.p2 - self.p1) == 2)


def load_tests(loader, tests, pattern):
    test_cases = unittest.TestSuite()
    for p1, p2 in [(1, 2), (3, 4)]:
        clsname = 'TestCase_{}_{}'.format(p1, p2)
        dct = {
            'p1': p1,
            'p2': p2,
        }
        cls = type(clsname, (GeneralTestCase,), dct)
        test_cases.addTest(cls('runTest1'))
        test_cases.addTest(cls('runTest2'))
    return test_cases

Outputs

1
2
..
3
4
..
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Ran 4 tests in 0.000s

OK
-1

Besides using setattr, we can use load_tests since python 3.2. Please refer to blog post blog.livreuro.com/en/coding/python/how-to-generate-discoverable-unit-tests-in-python-dynamically/

class Test(unittest.TestCase):
    pass

def _test(self, file_name):
    open(file_name, 'r') as f:
        self.assertEqual('test result',f.read())

def _generate_test(file_name):
    def test(self):
        _test(self, file_name)
    return test

def _generate_tests():
    for file in files:
        file_name = os.path.splitext(os.path.basename(file))[0]
        setattr(Test, 'test_%s' % file_name, _generate_test(file))

test_cases = (Test,)

def load_tests(loader, tests, pattern):
    _generate_tests()
    suite = TestSuite()
    for test_class in test_cases:
        tests = loader.loadTestsFromTestCase(test_class)
        suite.addTests(tests)
    return suite

if __name__ == '__main__':
    _generate_tests()
    unittest.main()
-1

Following is my solution. I find this useful when: 1. Should work for unittest.Testcase and unittest discover 2. Have a set of tests to be run for different parameter settings. 3. Very simple no dependency on other packages import unittest

    class BaseClass(unittest.TestCase):
        def setUp(self):
            self.param = 2
            self.base = 2

        def test_me(self):
            self.assertGreaterEqual(5, self.param+self.base)

        def test_me_too(self):
            self.assertLessEqual(3, self.param+self.base)



     class Child_One(BaseClass):
        def setUp(self):
            BaseClass.setUp(self)
            self.param = 4


     class Child_Two(BaseClass):
        def setUp(self):
            BaseClass.setUp(self)
            self.param = 1
  • Why the down vote? – S.Arora Jun 7 '17 at 15:31
  • This doesn't answer the question, which is about generating tests on the fly. – lenz Jan 4 '18 at 20:14

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