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I'm writing a program in Rust and I have some tests for it. I wrote a helper function for these tests, but whenever I build using cargo build it warns me that the function is never used:

warning: function is never used: ... #[warn(dead_code)] on by default

How I can mark this function as used so as not to get the warnings?

24

Specific question

How I can mark this function as used so as not to get the warnings?

The Rust compiler runs many lints to warn you about possible issues in your code and the dead_code lint is one of them. It can be very useful in pointing out mistakes when code is complete, but may also be a nuisance at earlier stages. However, all lints can be turned off by allowing them, and your error message (#[warn(dead_code)] on by default) contains the name of the lint you could disable.

#[allow(dead_code)]
fn my_unused_function() {}

Alternative for testing

I wrote a helper function for these tests, but whenever I build using cargo build it warns me that the function is never used.

This happens to be a special case, which is that code that is only used for testing isn't needed in the real executable and should probably not be included.

In order to optionally disable compilation of test code, you can mark it accordingly using the cfg attribute with the test profile.

#[cfg(test)]
fn my_test_specific_function() {}

When marked in this way, the compiler knows to ignore the method during compilation. This is similar to commonly used ifdef usage in other languages like C or C++, where you are telling a preprocessor to ignore the enclosed code unless TESTING is defined.

#ifdef TESTING
...
#endif
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    Am I missing something? I'm doing TDD and don't want to see warnings for tests that are being used by tests when I'm testing. If I were to produce a release build without the tests and with no implemented callers, then I would expect to see warnings, as the functions are truly not being used. Is there a way to have Rust warn me when the functions are actually not being used? – U007D Sep 23 '16 at 0:18
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    That's where the second case comes in, #[cfg(test)] would not turn off any dead code checks, so you would still have all warnings as expected, but the tests methods would only be included in a test version. – chills42 Sep 28 '16 at 17:28
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If something is only used in tests, it should be omitted altogether. This can be done with the #[cfg(test)] attribute.

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    "If something is only used in tests, it should be omitted altogether." What if you're writing a library, where the intent is for others' code, not this one, to use it? – Silas Barta Jun 5 '18 at 0:33
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    @SilasBarta: then it will be a public function, and not dead code. – Chris Morgan Jun 6 '18 at 5:33
  • Because the other responses aren't saying this very explicitly, and I keep having to rediscover this myself: if you're getting a dead code warning on a library function that you have tests for, one common reason for it is that you forgot to mark it pub. – rspeer Jul 18 at 21:49
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dead_code is a lint, which means you can allow it on the thing that's causing it to trigger.

#[allow(dead_code)]
fn dummy() {}

fn main() {}

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