25

This question already has an answer here:

The definition of Substring() method in .net System.String class is like this

public string Substring(int startIndex)

Where startIndex is "The zero-based starting character position of a substring in this instance" as per the method definition. If i understand it correctly, it means it will give me a part of the string, starting at the given zero-based index.

Now, if I have a string "ABC" and take substring with different indexes, I get following results.

var str = "ABC";
var chars = str.ToArray(); //returns 3 char 'A', 'B', 'C' as expected

var sub2 = str.Substring(2); //[1] returns "C" as expected
var sub3 = str.Substring(3); //[2] returns "" ...!!! Why no exception??
var sub4 = str.Substring(4); //[3] throws ArgumentOutOfRangeException as expected

Why it doesn't throw exception for case [2] ??

The string has 3 characters, so indexes are [0, 1, 2], and even ToArray(), ToCharArray() method returns 3 characters as expected! Shouldn't it throw exception if I try to Substring() with starting index 3?

marked as duplicate by Peter Duniho, BoltClock Oct 4 '15 at 9:41

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • Might be a \0 character (to mark the end of a string). But I am not sure if .NET uses that. Worth a google though – Stefan Oct 2 '15 at 11:37
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    Thanks @AlexK. and others (answers) for pointing out the implementation and MSDN documentation. I can see this is how the framework team has implemented this, but to me (and few others I guess) this is kind of unexpected! – Arghya C Oct 2 '15 at 11:49
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    the quick and dirty answer is: .NET knows what a 0-length string means, it doesn't know what a -1 length string means. – Michael Edenfield Oct 3 '15 at 22:02
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    Whether this question is closed as a duplicate has absolutely no effect on whether users can find the answers here. Indeed, if you were reading Atwood (and other's) comments about duplicates closely, key to the concept of "embracing duplicates" is that questions are still closed as duplicate. It's simply that retaining them assists users in finding the answers they want or need. – Peter Duniho Oct 4 '15 at 22:10
51

The documentation is quite explicit about this being correct behaviour:

Return value: a string that is equivalent to the substring that begins at startIndex in this instance, or Empty if startIndex is equal to the length of this instance.

Throws ArgumentOutOfRangeException if startIndex is less than zero or *greater than the length of this instance. *

In other words, taking a substring starting just beyond the final character will give you an empty string.

Your comment that you expected it to give you a part of the string is not incompatible with this. A "part of the string" includes the set of all substrings of zero length as well, as evidenced by the fact that s.substring(n, 0) will also give an empty string.

  • I can see this is the "implemented" behavior, but isn't it unexpected and confusing? – Arghya C Oct 2 '15 at 11:43
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    @ArghyaC, only to some, apparently :-) See my final paragraph. Since a substring can include zero-width entities between characters (if you ask for a length of zero), it makes sense that you can also get the zero-width entity after the final character. – paxdiablo Oct 2 '15 at 11:46
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    With that last paragraph, it kind of makes sense (in some way). Then it goes to null vs string.Empty direction. But thanks for the explanation :) – Arghya C Oct 2 '15 at 11:57
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    i was thinking why they decided to return empty string in this case.... s.substring(n, 0) answered my question ! – M.kazem Akhgary Oct 2 '15 at 12:42
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    @IsmaelMiguel Apparently that's not the case with strings in C#, see the Strings and embedded null characters section in this MSDN documentation msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.string.aspx – Arghya C Oct 2 '15 at 18:31
23

There are lots of technical answers here saying how the framework handles the method call, but I'd like to give a reasoning by analogy for why it is like it is.

Consider the string as a fence where the fence panels themselves are the characters, held up with fence posts numbered as shown below:

0   1   2   3
| A | B | C |   "ABC"

0   1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9
| M | y |   | S | t | r | i | n | g |   "My String"

In this analogy, string.Substring(n) returns a string of panels starting with fencepost n. Notice that the last character of the string has a fence post after it. Calling the function with this fence post returns a value stating there are no fence panels after this point (ie. it returns the empty string).

Similarly, string.Substring(n, l) returns a string of l panels starting with fencepost n. This is why something like "ABC".Substring(2, 0) returns "", too.

  • +1 I think a lot of pointer- and index-related concepts work best if one regards pointers and indices as identifying the spaces between items rather than identifying items themselves. The first item sits between index 0 and index 1; the second sits between 1 and 2, etc. In the case of strings, sometimes it's useful to regard strings as being followed by an infinite number of fenceposts with nothing between them (so in many versions of BASIC, for example, mid("Hello",23,1) will perfectly happily return an empty string). I wish language/framework authors would routinely include both... – supercat Oct 2 '15 at 17:23
  • ...methods which trap whenever there aren't enough fenceposts as well as methods which would happily return shorter or empty strings. Sometimes code wants to say "I need exactly 5 characters starting at index 9", but sometimes what's needed is "I need up to 5 characters starting at index 9, if the string extends that far". Both operations are needed often enough, IMHO, that it's worth having separate methods for both. – supercat Oct 2 '15 at 17:27
  • This is a nice analogy. But, generally index behaves as a pointer to one memory location/item in the array, not a location between items. Isn't it? Why it'd behave like this only for Substring? If this was the general behavior, then "ABC".ToArray()[3] shouldn't throw IndexOutOfRangeException IMHO. – Arghya C Oct 3 '15 at 4:57
  • @ArghyaC I guess that's just the difference between indexing an individual char (of which there is no concept of the empty character - value types cannot be null), and those methods that return a string (of which there is). Or, to get back to the analogy, .toArray() returns a pile of panels without their supporting fenceposts. – Phylogenesis Oct 5 '15 at 7:37
12

Sometimes looking at the code can be handy :

First this is called :

public string Substring(int startIndex)
{
    return this.Substring(startIndex, this.Length - startIndex);
}

The length is 0 due to substraction of value :

public string Substring(int startIndex, int length)
{
    if (startIndex < 0)
    {
        throw new ...
    }
    if (startIndex > this.Length)
    {
        throw new ...
    }
    if (length < 0)
    {
        throw new ...
    }
    if (startIndex > (this.Length - length))
    {
         throw new ...
    }
    if (length == 0) // <-- NOTICE HERE
    {
        return Empty;
    }
    if ((startIndex == 0) && (length == this.Length))
    {
        return this;
    }
    return this.InternalSubString(startIndex, length);
}
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    This code shows this is pretty much a "decided" behavior. For Substring(n, 0) returning string.Empty is almost obvious, but for Substring(lastIndex + 1)? Not so much, IMHO. But then, it'll be quite an opinionated debate :) – Arghya C Oct 2 '15 at 19:04
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    I agree . Pretty weird – Royi Namir Oct 2 '15 at 19:06
  • s.Substring(n) returns s.Substring(n, s.Length - n). So s.Substring(lastIndex + 1) means exactly (s.Substring(lastIndex + 1, 0)... – Michael Edenfield Oct 3 '15 at 22:02
  • @MikeEdenfield For (s.Substring(lastIndex + 1, 0) it returns an empty string, that we all know. Now, the method has 2 parameters, startIndex = lastIndex + 1 and length = 0. This behavior justifies for the second parameter. But, doesn't it look like it simply disregards the first parameter? Otherwise, why should it throw exception for (s.Substring(lastIndex + n, 0) where n > 1 ? – Arghya C Oct 4 '15 at 5:32
  • I admit that it's less obvious why, but I believe that makes sense. The Framework is conceptually doing two checks (in practice, the implementation is short-cutting most of them): 1. is there a string for me to take the substring of, and 2. how long a substring do I take? If you ask for SubString(length, 0), then step 1 says "yes, the empty string", and step two says "the 0-length string". Those are fine. But if you ask for Substring(length + 1, 0), then step one says "no, there's no string here to work with." – Michael Edenfield Oct 4 '15 at 11:29
4

Based on what is written on MSDN:

*

Return Value - A string that is equivalent to the substring that begins at startIndex in this instance, or Empty if startIndex is equal to the length of this instance.

Exceptions ArgumentOutOfRangeException - startIndex is less than zero or greater than the length of this instance

*

4

Looking at the String.Substring Method documentation, an empty string will be returned if the start index is equal to the length.

A string that is equivalent to the substring of length length that begins at startIndex in this instance, or Empty if startIndex is equal to the length of this instance and length is zero.

2

What Substring does is that it checks if startIndex is greater than the length of the string and only then it throws the exception. In your case it is equal (the string length is 3). After that it checks if the length of the substring is zero and if it is returns String.Empty. In your case the length of the substring is the length of the string (3) minus the startIndex (3). This is why the length of the substring is 0 and an empty string is returned.

1

All strings in C# in the end have String.Empty.

Here is good answer on this question.

From MSDN - String Class (System):

In the .NET Framework, a String object can include embedded null characters, which count as a part of the string's length. However, in some languages such as C and C++, a null character indicates the end of a string; it is not considered a part of the string and is not counted as part of the string's length.

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    This is just so wrong to say all strings in the end have "". It's like saying what all arrays in the end have one more item, which is array (!) and contains no items (!). Linked answer uses word matches, not have. What Substring does when 0 length string is requested is obvious - empty string is returned, but it's not because it's in the end of string or something like this. – Sinatr Oct 2 '15 at 11:53
  • @Sinatr we know this only after we decompile library – teo van kot Oct 2 '15 at 11:54
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    Nope, we know for sure what string doesn't have "" at the end. In C# this is true:"some string" == "some string" + "", but it's not because "" is added (and ignored during comparison) or exists at the end. It's because nothing happens when you operate with "". String.Empty is a special case and will be returned by string operating methods when 0 length string is a result of operation. – Sinatr Oct 2 '15 at 12:01
  • @Sinatr your comments explain some good points. Why don't you add as an answer, will be good if someone comes to this post in future. – Arghya C Oct 2 '15 at 12:18
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    @ArghyaC, answer of Royi Namir is already the perfect answer to your question. My comments here are related to this answer, which is wrong in my opinion (and should be deleted imho with all my comments addressed to the author). – Sinatr Oct 2 '15 at 12:25
1

To supplement other answers, Mono also correctly implements this behavior.

public String Substring (int startIndex)
{
    if (startIndex == 0)
        return this;
    if (startIndex < 0 || startIndex > this.length)
        throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException ("startIndex");

    return SubstringUnchecked (startIndex, this.length - startIndex);
}

// This method is used by StringBuilder.ToString() and is expected to
// always create a new string object (or return String.Empty). 
internal unsafe String SubstringUnchecked (int startIndex, int length)
{
    if (length == 0)
        return String.Empty;

    string tmp = InternalAllocateStr (length);
    fixed (char* dest = tmp, src = this) {
        CharCopy (dest, src + startIndex, length);
    }
    return tmp;
}

As you can see, it returns String.Empty if the length is equal to zero.

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    That's a nice compact implementation in Mono. And yes, it is functionally similar to the FCL implementations. – Arghya C Oct 2 '15 at 18:49

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