2

I'm trying to split a string and pop a value off of the returned array. How can I do this in one line?

my $string = 'test,string';

# Split and pop in one line
my $val = pop [split ',', $string];

print $val;

The result should be 'string' but instead I am getting this:

Type of arg 1 to pop must be array (not anonymous list ([]))


Here's my Perl version information in case it helps:

This is perl, v5.8.8 built for x86_64-linux-thread-multi

  • 1
    Why do you want to do it in a single line? – Borodin Oct 2 '15 at 23:36
2

If your intent is to get the last field after some number of commas, there are multiple way -- some way faster than others.

A greedy regex with a delimiter pattern + field pattern would be common, easy to read, and fast:

/.*(delimiter pattern)(field_pattern)/

The .* sucks ups all characters except the last instance of the delimiter. Then the field pattern returns the last field.

Using an anchored split (so that only two parts are returned) is also idiomatic:

my ($lh, $rh)=split(/([^,]+)$/, $string);

Now $rh has the last element of the split (and $lh has the part to the left of the last field).

The fastest (if $string is longish and your delimiter is invariant) would be something like:

substr $string, rindex( $string, ',' ) + length ',';

Benchmark of these and some other methods for curiosity:

use strict;
use warnings;
use Benchmark;

my $str;

my %subs = (
    regex => sub {
        my ($rh) = $str =~ /,([^,]+)$/;
        return $rh;
    },
    greedy_regex => sub {
        my ($rh) = $str =~ /.*,([^,]+)$/;
        return $rh;
    },
    split_once => sub {
        my ($lh, $rh)=split(/([^,]+)$/, $str, 2);
        return $rh;
    },
    split_slice => sub {
        my ($rh) = (split /,/, $str)[-1];
        return $rh;
    },
    pop => sub {
        my ($rh) = pop @{[split ',', $str]};
        return $rh;
    },
    rindex => sub {
        my ($rh) = substr $str, rindex( $str, ',' ) + length ',';
        return $rh;
    }
);

for my $n (10, 100, 1000, 10000) {
    $str=join(',', (1..$n));
    my @results=();
    for my $sub (keys %subs) {
        my $ret=@{[$subs{$sub}()]}[0];
        if ($ret ne $n){
            print "$sub: $ret != $n\n";
        }
        else {
            push @results, $sub;
        }
    }
    my $l=length($str);
    print join(', ', @results)," all returned  \"$n\" from a string $l characters long\n";
    Benchmark::cmpthese -1, \%subs;
    print "\n";
}

Prints:

split_once, pop, split_slice, regex, rindex, greedy_regex all returned  "10" from a string 20 characters long
                  Rate     pop split_once split_slice  regex greedy_regex rindex
pop           295080/s      --       -46%        -49%   -57%         -86%   -95%
split_once    546132/s     85%         --         -5%   -21%         -75%   -91%
split_slice   573439/s     94%         5%          --   -17%         -74%   -91%
regex         689852/s    134%        26%         20%     --         -68%   -89%
greedy_regex 2182991/s    640%       300%        281%   216%           --   -65%
rindex       6230669/s   2012%      1041%        987%   803%         185%     --

split_once, pop, split_slice, regex, rindex, greedy_regex all returned  "100" from a string 291 characters long
                  Rate    pop split_slice   regex split_once greedy_regex rindex
pop            29020/s     --        -50%    -54%       -54%         -98%  -100%
split_slice    57961/s   100%          --     -8%        -9%         -96%   -99%
regex          63015/s   117%          9%      --        -1%         -96%   -99%
split_once     63433/s   119%          9%      1%         --         -96%   -99%
greedy_regex 1536000/s  5193%       2550%   2338%      2321%           --   -75%
rindex       6068148/s 20810%      10369%   9530%      9466%         295%     --

split_once, pop, split_slice, regex, rindex, greedy_regex all returned  "1000" from a string 3892 characters long
                  Rate     pop   regex split_once split_slice greedy_regex rindex
pop             3428/s      --    -36%       -40%        -50%         -99%  -100%
regex           5333/s     56%      --        -7%        -23%         -99%  -100%
split_once      5749/s     68%      8%         --        -17%         -99%  -100%
split_slice     6892/s    101%     29%        20%          --         -98%  -100%
greedy_regex  417552/s  12082%   7730%      7163%       5958%           --   -93%
rindex       6036210/s 176002% 113085%    104894%      87479%        1346%     --

split_once, pop, split_slice, regex, rindex, greedy_regex all returned  "10000" from a string 48893 characters long
                  Rate      pop    regex split_once split_slice greedy_regex rindex
pop              355/s       --     -24%       -29%        -51%         -99%  -100%
regex            465/s      31%       --        -7%        -35%         -99%  -100%
split_once       501/s      41%       8%         --        -30%         -99%  -100%
split_slice      718/s     102%      54%        43%          --         -99%  -100%
greedy_regex   59076/s   16530%   12603%     11692%       8126%           --   -99%
rindex       5770465/s 1624294% 1240731%   1151756%     803382%        9668%     --

greedy_regex, split_slice, split_once, regex, pop, rindex all returned correctly with "10000" from a string 48893 characters long
                  Rate      pop split_once    regex split_slice greedy_regex rindex
pop              383/s       --       -26%     -26%        -45%         -99%  -100%
split_once       516/s      35%         --      -0%        -26%         -99%  -100%
regex            519/s      35%         0%       --        -25%         -99%  -100%
split_slice      693/s      81%        34%      34%          --         -99%  -100%
greedy_regex   59076/s   15311%     11349%   11293%       8425%           --   -99%
rindex       6109904/s 1593788%   1183990% 1178239%     881582%       10242%     --

You can see that rindex is by far the fastest with a greedy regex a very useable second. If the string are few and short, I suppose you can use any that balance out idiom and readability and that is your solution.

  • Does your "fastest" method work if the string contains more than one ","? – tjwrona1992 Oct 2 '15 at 19:33
  • Yes. rindex finds the last character (the right most) in a string. Looks at this benchmark in the middle of the page. – dawg Oct 2 '15 at 19:36
  • Wow, I've never even heard of rindex. Awesome! – tjwrona1992 Oct 2 '15 at 20:02
  • All of this is largely irrelevant to the average program, which can easily afford the 4μs that even the slowest of these choices take to perform the operation. What is most important is that the code is clear and legible, and what I would write is sub { $str =~ /.*,(.*)/ and $1 } which also happens to be much faster than all of your options except rindex – Borodin Oct 3 '15 at 1:46
  • @Borodin: I timed $str =~ /.*,(.*)/ and $1 vs $str =~ /.*,([^,]+)/ and I get that they are about the same speed. I agree that clarity matters, but clarity is in the eye of the beholder. The rindex method is clear to me. I disagree that the speed of some of these methods does not matter. To naively use /,(\w+)$/ when the simple change to /.*,(.*)/ is just as clear and nearly 100 x faster. – dawg Oct 3 '15 at 14:58
8

push, pop, shift, and unshift are for manipulating arrays. It sounds like you just want to get the last value from the list returned by split, which you can get with a list slice:

my $val = (split /,/, $foo)[-1];
  • 1
    Its funny, I didn't realize there was a difference between a "list" and an "array" in Perl... You learn something new every day! – tjwrona1992 Oct 2 '15 at 18:34
  • 1
    @tjwrona1992 That's a very important distinction that a lot of Perl programmers have trouble with. I would recommend reading Arrays vs. Lists in Perl: What's the Difference? – ThisSuitIsBlackNot Oct 2 '15 at 18:36
  • 2
    note that if $foo is empty, this will produce undef – ysth Oct 2 '15 at 18:40
  • 1
    As @ysth stated, that'll produce later warnings of Use of uninitialized value $val in print. To get around this, use an || (or) condition: my $val = (split /,/, $foo)[-1] || ''; to return an empty list if the split doesn't return anything – stevieb Oct 2 '15 at 18:49
  • 2
    @stevieb Defined-or would be better in case $val is defined but falsey. – ThisSuitIsBlackNot Oct 2 '15 at 18:54
7

[] returns a reference to an array, but pop expects an actual array, so the solution is to dereference the array as follows:

my $val = pop @{[split ',', $string]};
  • Thanks for the clarification @ikegami. I would upvote it, but I cant vote on my own post :( – tjwrona1992 Oct 2 '15 at 18:50
  • 1
    Starting in Perl 5.14 you can pop an array reference, so my $val = pop [split ',', $string]; would work. I still think this is evil, though! – mwp Oct 2 '15 at 19:00
  • Its also experimental. It works on my Windows PC (Perl v 5.20), but it gives a warning pop on reference is experimental. – tjwrona1992 Oct 2 '15 at 19:01
  • Ah yes, I didn't see that in the perldoc on the first read through. Good to note. – mwp Oct 2 '15 at 19:01
  • 3
    @mwp, It was an experimental feature that won't be available in 5.22. (Some history: It wasn't flagged as experimental initially, but p5p realized they made a mistake. Going forwards, new features will start off as experimental. perlpolicy has been updated.) – ikegami Oct 2 '15 at 19:06
1

If efficiency is a concern, just use a regex. Splitting strings and popping arrays is (potentially) expensive.

my ($val) = $string =~ /,(\w+)$/
  • 1
    splitting is generally way faster than a reg match. Despite passing a regex pattern, a much lighter engine is used. – ikegami Oct 2 '15 at 18:41
  • @ikegami, Is this true even for pre-compiled regex's using qr{}? – tjwrona1992 Oct 2 '15 at 18:42
  • Yeah, I think so. Not sure what exactly is different, but the benchmarks speak for themselves. – ikegami Oct 2 '15 at 18:42
  • Hi @ikegami, long time no talk. I must be misremembering something from a long time ago. Thank you for correcting me! – mwp Oct 2 '15 at 18:43
  • Interesting, this is good to know. – tjwrona1992 Oct 2 '15 at 18:43

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.