20

Looking for clarification on using "zd" with printf().

Certainly the following is correct with C99 and later.

void print_size(size_t sz) {
  printf("%zu\n", sz);
}

The C spec seems to allow printf("%zd\n", sz) depending on how it is read:

7.21.6.1 The fprintf function

z Specifies that a following d, i, o, u, x, or X conversion specifier applies to a size_t or the corresponding signed integer type argument; or that a following n conversion specifier applies to a pointer to a signed integer type corresponding to size_t argument. C11dr §7.21.6.1 7

Should this be read as

  1. "z Specifies that a following d ... conversion specifier applies to a size_t or the corresponding signed integer type argument ... "(both types) and "z Specifies that a following u ... conversion specifier applies to a size_t or the corresponding signed integer type argument ..." (both types)

OR

  1. "z Specifies that a following d ... conversion specifier applies to a corresponding signed integer type argument ..." (signed type only) and "z Specifies that a following u ... conversion specifier applies to a size_t" (unsigned type only).

I've been using the #2 definition, but now not so sure.

Which is correct, 1, 2, or something else?

If #2 is correct, what is an example of a type that can use "%zd"?

2 Answers 2

25
+50

printf with a "%zd" format expects an argument of the signed type that corresponds to the unsigned type size_t.

Standard C doesn't provide a name for this type or a good way to determine what it is. If size_t is a typedef for unsigned long, for example, then "%zd" expects an argument of type long, but that's not a portable assumption.

The standard requires that corresponding signed and unsigned types use the same representation for the non-negative values that are representable in both types. A footnote says that this is meant to imply that they're interchangeable as function arguments. So this:

size_t s = 42;
printf("s = %zd\n", s);

should work, and should print "42". It will interpret the value 42, of the unsigned type size_t, as if it were of the corresponding signed type. But there's really no good reason to do that, since "%zu" is also correct and well defined, without resorting to additional language rules. And "%zu" works for all values of type size_t, including those outside the range of the corresponding signed type.

Finally, POSIX defines a type ssize_t in the headers <unistd.h> and <sys/types.h>. Though POSIX doesn't explicitly say so, it's likely that ssize_t will be the signed type corresponding to size_t. So if you're writing POSIX-specific code, "%zd" is (probably) the correct format for printing values of type ssize_t.

UPDATE: POSIX explicitly says that ssize_t isn't necessarily the signed version of size_t, so it's unwise to write code that assumes that it is:

ssize_t

This is intended to be a signed analog of size_t. The wording is such that an implementation may either choose to use a longer type or simply to use the signed version of the type that underlies size_t. All functions that return ssize_t (read() and write()) describe as "implementation-defined" the result of an input exceeding {SSIZE_MAX}. It is recognized that some implementations might have ints that are smaller than size_t. A conforming application would be constrained not to perform I/O in pieces larger than {SSIZE_MAX}, but a conforming application using extensions would be able to use the full range if the implementation provided an extended range, while still having a single type-compatible interface. The symbols size_t and ssize_t are also required in <unistd.h> to minimize the changes needed for calls to read() and write(). Implementors are reminded that it must be possible to include both <sys/types.h> and <unistd.h> in the same program (in either order) without error.

6
  • @MK.: That's weird. It says you edited my answer 2 hours ago (I don't object to that) and deleted 2 characters in the body, but I don't see a change. Mar 21, 2017 at 20:49
  • 4
    @KeithThompson yeah I had to. It wouldn't allow me to replace downvote with up vote because it' sbeen 2 hours. Which is completely moronic because I can edit and change. I asked on meta to remove the limitation of people who have enough rep to edit, but it didn't go anywhere. The change was removing extra blank line before the link footnotes which are not displayed, so you can't see it (I honestly tried coming up with a meaningful edit but the answer was too good :)
    – MK.
    Mar 21, 2017 at 21:07
  • OK, no problem. It just seemed odd that I couldn't see any change in the edit history. Mar 21, 2017 at 21:09
  • "The standard requires that corresponding signed and unsigned types use the same representation for the non-negative values that are representable in both types." --> Is that due to C11 §6.5.2.2 6? Jun 11, 2017 at 15:21
  • 3
    @chux: 6.2.6.2p5: "A valid (non-trap) object representation of a signed integer type where the sign bit is zero is a valid object representation of the corresponding unsigned type, and shall represent the same value." I just noticed that doesn't specify the other direction, though it would require a peculiar representation with multiple representations for the same non-zero value to break the symmetry. Jun 11, 2017 at 20:15
0

According to the little test I have done, "zd" is always true ,but "zu" don't work for negative numbers.

Test Code:

  #include <stdio.h>
  int main (void)
  {  int i;
     size_t uzs = 1;
     ssize_t zs = -1;
    for ( i= 0; i<5 ;i++, uzs <<= 16,zs <<= 16 )
    {
       printf ("%zu\t", uzs); /*true*/
       printf ("%zd\t", uzs); /*true*/

       printf ("%zu\t", zs); /* false*/
       printf ("%zd\n", zs); /*true*/
    }
    return 0;
}
6
  • 1
    What's this about "true" and "false"? Oct 3, 2015 at 19:17
  • Thanks for the test, but certain '"zd" is always true' will fail when uzs is large like SIZE_MAX. May 11, 2016 at 11:12
  • 5
    Testing is not the correct way to determine if things are legal in C.
    – user694733
    Feb 21, 2017 at 14:43
  • Note that when given a negative value, %u will always report something else (in a well-defined way)
    – Phlarx
    Sep 1, 2017 at 19:07
  • @Phlarx "%u will always report something else (in a well-defined way)" --> it it not well defined, yet commonly that undefined behavior is not objectionable. Apr 6, 2018 at 11:56

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.