18

I have a class that has function pointer to kernel function, that can change from outside.

class Bar 
{
   public:
     int i;
}

class Foo 
{
   public:
     std::function<double()> kernel;
     Bar bar;         
};

int main()
{

  Foo f;
  f.kernel = []() -> double { return i * i; }; //this is not working obviously

}

How can I achieve behaviour that is "presented", eg. read class variables inside lambda. I can bypass it by passing f inside and write f.bar.i, but that is not very nice solution.

6
  • 1
    What's wrong with [&f]() { return f.i * f.i; }?
    – Kerrek SB
    Oct 3, 2015 at 11:38
  • @KerrekSB I have edited the question Oct 3, 2015 at 11:42
  • So you basically want to call f.kernel() and kernel should automatically be bound to f like it was a member function?
    – dhke
    Oct 3, 2015 at 11:42
  • @dhke yes.. basically that is what I want Oct 3, 2015 at 11:42
  • Why isn't it just a member-function then?
    – NaCl
    Oct 3, 2015 at 11:43

3 Answers 3

25

In C++14 you can write it as,

f.kernel = [&i = f.bar.i]() -> double { return i * i; };

If you don't have C++14, you can alternatively create another variable,

int &i = f.bar.i;
f.kernel = [&i]() -> double { return i*i; };

Though there's nothing wrong with passing f and writing f.bar.i.

3
  • 1
    Nice. But this binds the kernel lambda to that particular instance of f, doesn't it? Hence if I do f2.kernel = f.kernel and call f2.kernel() I get the i from f? Might not be a problem, though.
    – dhke
    Oct 3, 2015 at 11:57
  • 1
    just an FYI compiling the first example with g++ -std=c++11 gives warning: lambda capture initializers only available with -std=c++14 or -std=gnu++14 so it is a C++ 14 feature Oct 3, 2015 at 11:57
  • @NathanOliver Removed the "believe". @dhke Yes, if you copy the kernel from f to f2 then you'd be using the same function if you call it from either instance.
    – aslg
    Oct 3, 2015 at 12:02
8

It seems that you cannot do so. There is no construct to create a member function lambda.

But you probably can follow @KerrekSB's suggestion and in addition to that dispatch the call to still get the member function:

class Foo 
{
public:
    double kernel()
    {
        _kernel(*this);
    }

    std::function<double(Foo &)> _kernel;
};


Foo f;
f._kernel = [](Foo &f) -> double { return f.i * f.i; };
f.kernel()

Note that you cannot name both fields kernel.

1
  • 1
    I like this solution too. You could also make _kernel static so that all instances would share the same "member function".
    – aslg
    Oct 3, 2015 at 13:03
0

The lambda function does not know about i or Bar. How could it know? You need to pass a Reference. If you define the function body differently so you can pass i as parameter and you call it within the class you should get what you want.

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