I am building a mobile-focused web application, to later convert to hybrid, and I would prefer new user registrations confirm the user's phone number versus their email address.

I would like to send a new user an SMS with a unique code. When they first log in, they must enter that code to activate their account.

I have a custom SMS service that is sending SMS fine, and would like to know how to integrate this into the Identity registration process.

Please note that I do not wish to use SMS for routine two-factor authentication.

  • Are you using Entity Framework for your user accounts? If not, I have done this before using Nexmo & Parse. Let me know if this is what you're looking for. – Sidharth Sharma Oct 5 '15 at 2:56
  • I am using EF for accounts, but surely where the number is stored is irrelevant. – ProfK Oct 5 '15 at 6:05
  • if there is a SMS then it is two-factor authentication? – MstfAsan Oct 9 '15 at 13:39
  • @ConvertToInt32 Two-factor authentication uses an SMS every time a user logs on. – ProfK Oct 9 '15 at 15:57
up vote 8 down vote accepted
+50

You can use create additional actions in your account controller and use methods from Microsoft.AspNet.Identity.Core

  1. UserManager.GenerateChangePhoneNumberToken
  2. Send sms with token
  3. UserManager.VerifyChangePhoneNumberToken
  4. Add custom logic to authorization
  • Sounds good, thanks. I will try it out later today. – ProfK Oct 9 '15 at 15:58

There are several ways to accomplish this.

  1. Cheap but not reliable or enterprise ready is to build an app on a device you own and have those other devices send an SMS to it. You can process the SMS and reply however you like. With unlimited texting plans, it would be fine. It's just not redundant or reliable (the phone battery could die, you may need to do updates that could interrupt service, etc.)

  2. Work with a company like Twilio (https://www.twilio.com/) and use their SMS gateway, API and services to build, quickly and cheaply (for the most part) the type of service you are looking to provide. There are competitors to Twilio and I'm not endorsing them, just providing them as an example.

  3. Obtain your own SMS gateway (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SMS_gateway) and then do heavily integrated and customized services.

If this is just a proof of concept at the enterprise level or you don't know what your user adoption rate will be, then #1 is probably fine until you need #2. #3 is rarely the best option.

  • Thank you, but I already have an SMS service, build for a local provider with much the same services as e.g. Twillio. I'm not asking how to send SMS, but how to nicely integrate my SMS sender into the Identity new user verification. I guess I can tear into that code and find where the email confirmation is sent, and swap that out for SMS, but I was hoping for some guidance on what to and what not to do there. – ProfK Oct 4 '15 at 4:59

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.