2

I have a problem that I couldn't reproduce on a brand new project; it's happening on Bukkit plugins, built against Spigot 1.8.8-R0.1.

I'm developing a command framework. There are two types of commands: those which can only be run by players...

private Map<Command, PlayerCommand> playerCommands = new HashMap<>();
public interface PlayerCommand {
    void run(Player sender, String[] args);
}

...and those which may be run by the console too.

private Map<Command, GlobalCommand> globalCommands = new HashMap<>();
public interface GlobalCommand {
    void run(CommandSender sender, String[] args);
}

To register the command, I have implemented 3 methods:

  • 2 public methods for each command type, that should add each custom executor to its specific HashMap.
public void registerCommand(String name, PlayerCommand executor) {
    Command command = registerCommand(name);
    // 2
    playerCommands.put(command, executor);
}
public void registerCommand(String name, GlobalCommand executor) {
    Command command = registerCommand(name);
    // 2'
    globalCommands.put(command, executor);
}
  • 1 private method for the logic they have in common, i.e. setting their Bukkit's CommandExecutor property as the current instance (that will handle them later, delegating work to the specific custom executor taken from the maps).
private Command registerCommand(String name) {
    PluginCommand command = plugin.getCommand(name);
    if (command.getExecutor() == this) {
        throw new CommandAlreadyRegisteredException("The '" + name + "' command has been already registered");
    }
    // 1
    command.setExecutor(this);
    return command;
}

As you may have noticed, the client shouldn't be able to register the same command more than one time.

To achieve this, I know I could have asked the maps for already containing the command, but that would've been two operations, while checking for the executor with the == operator (it must be exactly this instance, not just equals()) is just one.

So, for the wrong case, I decided to throw an unchecked exception:

public class CommandAlreadyRegisteredException extends RuntimeException {
    private static final long serialVersionUID = 1L;
    protected CommandAlreadyRegisteredException(String message) {
        super(message);
    }
}

Here's the point: I was expecting that throwing an exception would return in the method that throws it, and in the upper, caller methods. That is, points 1, 2 and 2' should never get executed in that case. But they do get executed! How is this possible? Can you reproduce it? Why does this happen?

I know I could have just returned null in the private method, but then the client wouldn't have been made aware of the command being already registered.

0
1

First attempt to register the command:

  • You get the command from the plugin.
  • The command has no executor so the check fails.
  • Then you set the executor.

Second attempt:

  • You get the command from the plugin. It's the same object as the command you got the first time.
  • It still sees this as its executor. Check passes, exception is thrown.

If all you want is to stop it from being registered twice by the same executor, there's absolutely no need for an exception:

private Command registerCommand(String name) {
    PluginCommand command = plugin.getCommand(name);
    if (command.getExecutor() != this) {
        command.setExecutor(this);
    }
    return command;
}
0
0

There is no bug.

In order to debug, I had added some System.out.println() after the exception being thrown. I was getting those breakpoints printed exactly once. That's ok, because that was the first registration that was allowed, but for some reason, I thought they were caused by the second... I don't know why.

-3

You need to extend your custom exception class from Exception rather than RuntimeException as then that'll be checked and after that you can use the code throw new YourException() wherever you need that exception to be thrown.

8
  • I don't want to have to use a try-catch block every time I need to register a command. Are you saying unchecked exceptions don't block code execution? – sponge Oct 3 '15 at 15:38
  • All exceptions are able to block further execution of a program. But to throw a custom exception you have to do it explicitly as the Java runtime doesn't have any way of knowing when you want your exception to be thrown and for that you have to use the throw keyword which I didn't see in your code . And it's more natural to extend from the Exception class as that's more safe because the exception would then become checked whereas subclasses of the RuntimeException are unchecked – zulkarnain shah Oct 3 '15 at 15:44
  • Look at the second code block, line 21. – sponge Oct 3 '15 at 15:46
  • This is not a problem with whether the exception is checked, but why the runtime chooses not to let the thrown unchecked exception block the execution. – Unihedron Oct 3 '15 at 15:51
  • I'm sorry I now realized that you've actually thrown the exception explicitly. Have you checked whether the condition actually passes. I mean does that if condition fail or pass – zulkarnain shah Oct 3 '15 at 15:55

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