43

What is the difference between using eq and eql in rspec tests? Is there a difference between:

it "adds the correct information to entries" do
  # book = AddressBook.new # => Replaced by line 4
  book.add_entry('Ada Lovelace', '010.012.1815', 'augusta.king@lovelace.com')
  new_entry = book.entries[0]

  expect(new_entry.name).to eq('Ada Lovelace')
  expect(new_entry.phone_number).to eq('010.012.1815')
  expect(new_entry.email).to eq('augusta.king@lovelace.com')
end

and:

it "adds the correct information to entries" do
  # book = AddressBook.new # => Replaced by line 4
  book.add_entry('Ada Lovelace', '010.012.1815', 'augusta.king@lovelace.com')
  new_entry = book.entries[0]

  expect(new_entry.name).to eql('Ada Lovelace')
  expect(new_entry.phone_number).to eql('010.012.1815')
  expect(new_entry.email).to eql('augusta.king@lovelace.com')
end

2 Answers 2

55

There are subtle differences here, based on the type of equality being used in the comparison.

From the Rpsec docs:

Ruby exposes several different methods for handling equality:

a.equal?(b) # object identity - a and b refer to the same object
a.eql?(b) # object equivalence - a and b have the same value
a == b # object equivalence - a and b have the same value with type conversions]

eq uses the == operator for comparison, and eql ignores type conversions.

3
  • Would a type conversion mean it is looking for the objects or things being compared to be the same type of object? Oct 3, 2015 at 20:13
  • 9
    @austinthesing it means that 42.0 == 42 produces true and 42.0.eql? 42 produces false. Apr 18, 2016 at 18:19
  • 1
    It is to be noted that the type is not converted from a string. So if you will compare "1" == 1, it will always return false
    – punitcse
    Jul 12, 2019 at 10:57
29

The differences are subtle.eq is the same as the ruby implementation of ==. On the other hand eql is the same as the ruby implementation of eql?.

eq checks object equivalence and will type cast to convert different object to the same type.

Two objects are equivalent if they are of the same class and have the same value but they are not necessarily the same object in memory.

expect(:my_symbol).to eq(:my_symbol)
# passes, both are identical.
expect('my string').to eq('my string')
# passes, objects are equivalent 
expect(5).to eq(5.0)
# passes, Objects are not equivalent but was type cast to same object type. 

eql checks object equivalence and does not try type casting.

expect(:my_symbol).to eql(:my_symbol)
# passes, both are identical.
expect('my string').to eql('my string')
# passes, objects are equivalent but not identical 
expect(5).to eql(5.0)
# fails, Objects are not equivalence, did not try to type cast

equal checks object identity. Two object are identical if they are the same object meaning they have same object id (share the same address in memory).

expect(:my_symbol).to equal(:my_symbol)
# passes, both are identical.
expect('my string').to equal('my string')
# fails, objects are equivalent but not identical
expect(5).to equal(5.0)
# fails, objects are not equivalent and not identical
1
  • 8
    My silly mnemonic for this is the longer the method name the stricter the comparison: eq < eql < equal
    – tantrix
    May 14, 2020 at 20:15

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