13

So I have code in my application that appends to a has_many relation with the "<<" operator like so:

class BlogPost < ActiveRecord::Base    
    has_many :comments

    def add_comment(content)
        @new_comment = Comment.create(content)
        self.comments << @new_comment
    end
end

And it seems to work. I never really questioned it or wondered when it calls "save" (I guess I never had a strong understanding of when to call "save" to begin with).

However, it seems that the after_save hook on comments doesn't get activated in my add_comment function, which prompts me to ask:

How does the << operator work in activerecord and where can I read more about it?

Thanks

2 Answers 2

21

When you use the shovel operator (<<), Rails automatically saves the associated object. So, when you do this:

self.comments << @new_comment

@new_comment is added to the comments collection and instantly fires update SQL without waiting for the save or update call on the parent object, unless the parent object is a new record.

From this documentation

collection<<(object, …) Adds one or more objects to the collection by creating associations in the join table (collection.push and collection.concat are aliases to this method). Note that this operation instantly fires update SQL without waiting for the save or update call on the parent object, unless the parent object is a new record.

2
  • 4
    Oh I see, I had alot of trouble searching for "<<" - nice to know it's called the "Shovel" operator :)
    – cozos
    Oct 5, 2015 at 4:37
  • 4
    actually it saves the pushed record only if the "parent" item responds true to "persisted?". If you call "<<" on a new_record it doesn't save on the db.
    – sekmo
    May 1, 2017 at 13:06
0

collection<<(object, …)

Adds one or more objects to the collection by creating associations in the join table (collection.push and collection.concat are aliases to this method) or by setting their foreign keys to the collection’s primary key. Note that this operation instantly fires update SQL without waiting for the save or update call on the parent object, unless the parent object is a new record.

Example:

class Group < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many   :users
  has_many   :avatars, through: :users
end

class User < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :group
  has_one    :avatar
end

class Avatar < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :user
end

@group.avatars << Avatar.new   # this would work if User belonged_to Avatar rather than the other way around

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