16

Is it possible to serialize a method containing yield statements (or a class that contains such a method) such that when you rehydrate the class, the internal state of the generated iterator is retained?

  • 1
    You want to start running the method in one place, and continue running it in a different place? – arootbeer Jul 20 '10 at 20:49
  • 1
    @arootbeer: It could be a "save progress" thing too, it doesn't have to be sent over the wire necessarily. – Scott Stafford Jul 20 '10 at 20:51
  • @Scott Stafford: That makes more sense. – arootbeer Jul 20 '10 at 20:52
8

Yes, you can do this. With caveats.

An example of serializing a method with a yield, deserializing and continuing can be found here: http://www.agilekiwi.com/dotnet/CountingDemo.cs (Web Archive Link).

In general, trying to serialize without doing some extra work will fail. This is bcause the compiler generated classes are not marked with the Serializable attribute. However, you can work around this.

I would note the reason that they aren't marked with serializable is because they are an implementation detail and subject to breaking changes in future versions, so you may not be able to deserialize it in a newer version.

Related to a question I asked on how to serialize anonymous delegates, which should work for this case as well.

Here's the source code of the "hack":

// Copyright © 2007 John M Rusk (http://www.agilekiwi.com)
// 
// You may use this source code in any manner you wish, subject to 
// the following conditions:
//
// (a) The above copyright notice and this permission notice shall be
//     included in all copies or substantial portions of the Software.
//
// (b) THE SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED "AS IS", WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND,
//     EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO THE WARRANTIES
//     OF MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE AND
//     NONINFRINGEMENT. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE AUTHORS OR COPYRIGHT
//     HOLDERS BE LIABLE FOR ANY CLAIM, DAMAGES OR OTHER LIABILITY,
//     WHETHER IN AN ACTION OF CONTRACT, TORT OR OTHERWISE, ARISING
//     FROM, OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE SOFTWARE OR THE USE OR
//     OTHER DEALINGS IN THE SOFTWARE.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Diagnostics;
using System.IO;
using System.Reflection;
using System.Runtime.Serialization;
using System.Runtime.Serialization.Formatters.Soap;

namespace AgileKiwi.PersistentIterator.Demo
{
    /// <summary>
    /// This is the class we will enumerate over
    /// </summary>
    [Serializable]
    public class SimpleEnumerable
    {
        public IEnumerator<string> Foo()
        {
            yield return "One";
            yield return "Two";
            yield return "Three";
        }

        #region Here is a more advanced example
        // This shows that the solution even works for iterators which call other iterators
        // See SimpleFoo below for a simpler example
        public IEnumerator<string> AdvancedFoo()
        {
            yield return "One";
            foreach (string s in Letters())
                yield return "Two " + s;
            yield return "Three";
        }

        private IEnumerable<string> Letters()
        {
            yield return "a";
            yield return "b";
            yield return "c";
        }
        #endregion
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// This is the command-line program which calls the iterator and serializes the state
    /// </summary>
    public class Program
    {
        public static void Main()
        {
            // Create/restore the iterator
            IEnumerator<string> e;
            if (File.Exists(StateFile))
                e = LoadIterator();
            else
                e = (new SimpleEnumerable()).Foo(); // start new iterator

            // Move to next item and display it.
            // We can't use foreach here, because we only want to get ONE 
            // result at a time.
            if (e.MoveNext())
                Console.WriteLine(e.Current);
            else
                Console.WriteLine("Finished.  Delete the state.xml file to restart");

            // Save the iterator state back to the file
            SaveIterator(e);

            // Pause if running from the IDE
            if (Debugger.IsAttached)
            {
                Console.Write("Press any key...");
                Console.ReadKey();
            }
        }

        static string StateFile
        {
            get {
                return Path.Combine(
                    Path.GetDirectoryName(Assembly.GetEntryAssembly().Location),
                    "State.xml");
            }
        }

        static IEnumerator<string> LoadIterator()
        {
            using (FileStream stream = new FileStream(StateFile, FileMode.Open))
            {
                ISurrogateSelector selector = new EnumerationSurrogateSelector();
                IFormatter f = new SoapFormatter(selector, new StreamingContext());
                return (IEnumerator<string>)f.Deserialize(stream);
            }
        }

        static void SaveIterator(IEnumerator<string> e)
        {
            using (FileStream stream = new FileStream(StateFile, FileMode.Create))
            {
                ISurrogateSelector selector = new EnumerationSurrogateSelector();
                IFormatter f = new SoapFormatter(selector, new StreamingContext());
                f.Serialize(stream, e);
            }
            #region Note: The above code puts the name of the compiler-generated enumerator class...
            // into the serialized output.  Under what circumstances, if any, might a recompile result in
            // a different class name?  I have not yet investigated what the answer might be.
            // I suspect MS provide no guarantees in that regard.
            #endregion
        }
    }

    #region Helper classes to serialize iterator state
    // See http://msdn.microsoft.com/msdnmag/issues/02/09/net/#S3 
    class EnumerationSurrogateSelector : ISurrogateSelector
    {
        ISurrogateSelector _next;

        public void ChainSelector(ISurrogateSelector selector)
        {
            _next = selector;
        }

        public ISurrogateSelector GetNextSelector()
        {
            return _next;
        }

        public ISerializationSurrogate GetSurrogate(Type type, StreamingContext context, out ISurrogateSelector selector)
        {
            if (typeof(System.Collections.IEnumerator).IsAssignableFrom(type))
            {
                selector = this;
                return new EnumeratorSerializationSurrogate();
            }
            else
            {
                //todo: check this section
                if (_next == null)
                {
                    selector = null;
                    return null;
                }
                else
                {
                    return _next.GetSurrogate(type, context, out selector);
                }
            }
        }
    }

    // see http://msdn.microsoft.com/msdnmag/issues/02/09/net/#S3
    class EnumeratorSerializationSurrogate : ISerializationSurrogate
    {
        public void GetObjectData(object obj, SerializationInfo info, StreamingContext context)
        {
            foreach(FieldInfo f in obj.GetType().GetFields(BindingFlags.Instance | BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.NonPublic))
                info.AddValue(f.Name, f.GetValue(obj));
        }

        public object SetObjectData(object obj, SerializationInfo info, StreamingContext context,
                                    ISurrogateSelector selector)
        {
            foreach (FieldInfo f in obj.GetType().GetFields(BindingFlags.Instance | BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.NonPublic))
                f.SetValue(obj, info.GetValue(f.Name, f.FieldType));
            return obj;
        }
    }
    #endregion
}
  • unfortunately, the link is now broken – bohdan_trotsenko Dec 5 '13 at 13:06
  • @modosansreves fortunately it was backed up on web archive. – Bartek Banachewicz Apr 13 '14 at 20:57
  • Thank you for the archive link! – deek0146 Nov 13 '18 at 14:40
5

Internally, yield statement is transformed to state machine implemented as class that implements IEnumerator interface. It allows to iterate throught resultset using multiple foreach statements at the same time. That class is not visible to your code, it is not marked as serializable.

So, answer is no, it is not possible. But, you can implement desired enumerator by itself, but it requires more labor than yield.

  • 4
    I would say this is not entirely correct. It is possible, but perhaps strongly not recommended. – Joseph Kingry Jul 20 '10 at 21:15
1

Just make sure that just before you call yield, that you save state (i.e., the iterators position) in a serializable field (the location field, or whatever you call it). Then, when the class is deserialized, simply continue where you left off, using the location field.

But, when will this be useful? Do you plan to serialize objects in the middle of a foreach loop? Maybe you make it a lot easier if you give you class a SetIteratorPosition() method, which defaults to the current position. It's clearer than adding side effects to existing well defined behavior (yield) and everyone'll understand that IteratorPosition can be saved.

Note: methods cannot be serialized. You serialize data, i.e., properties and fields.

1

Yes. Any method that returns an IEnumerable can have it's own code for yield return whatever you tell it to. If you serialize the internal state of your object as to what it was iterating and how far it got, then you can reload that state at some future time, and continue the enumeration right where you left off.

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