2

How do i print e1 and e2 values. it does not return any values.

class Employee:

    def __init__(self,name,age):
       self.name=name
       self.age=age

       e1=Employee("xyz",'25')
       e2=Employee("abc",'23')
       print("Employee Details...")

       print("Name:",e1.name,"age:",e1.age)
       print("Name:",e2.name,"age:",e2.age)
       return
t=Employee()
print t
  • Exactly what are you trying to do? What are you getting (Error or unexpected result?) ? – Anand S Kumar Oct 5 '15 at 8:52
  • @AnandSKumar, i think, you have edited by solving the issue the code had. Wrong edit – Ahsanul Haque Oct 5 '15 at 8:54
  • @AhsanulHaque No, I haven't I just included class Employee: line, which was not inside the code block, into the code block. The above program as it is, does not run for sure. It is trying to create Employee() , but Employee()'s __init__() takes 2 more arguments. – Anand S Kumar Oct 5 '15 at 8:55
  • That's because of no parameter is passed. I don't know who edited it, but certainly __init__ is not there. function name was fun – Ahsanul Haque Oct 5 '15 at 8:57
  • 1
    @AhsanulHaque The op changed it from` fun()` to __init__() . – Anand S Kumar Oct 5 '15 at 8:58
1

What you are trying to do seems like reinventing the __str__ method. Here is a suggestion how you could do that:

class Employee:

    def __init__(self, name, age):
        self.name = name
        self.age = age

    def __str__(self):
        return "Name: {0}, age: {1}".format(self.name, self.age)


t = Employee("uday", 25)
print t

I am making here some assumptions and am trying to guess your actual goal. I hope that it still helps.

| improve this answer | |
  • __repr__ is the right method to override for printing object in user readable form. – ozgur Oct 5 '15 at 9:02
  • 1
    @ozgur Take a look here please: stackoverflow.com/questions/1436703/…. It says __str__ is okay for printing human readable output. __repr__ should rather provide a unique output. Depending on the goals of the OP, maybe __repr__ would fit better, but as said I'm just making some assumptions and therefore my answer is based on them. – cezar Oct 5 '15 at 9:05
  • @cezar: I agree that your __str__ definition is appropriate. However, as the accepted answer on the page you linked says: "almost every object you implement should have a functional __repr__ that’s usable for understanding the object. Implementing __str__ is optional: do that if you need a “pretty print” functionality". – PM 2Ring Oct 5 '15 at 9:15
  • Let's not get into an extended discussion of this topic here. If you do want to discuss it, please feel free to do so in the SO Python Chat room. – PM 2Ring Oct 5 '15 at 9:18
  • @PM2Ring I'm just assuming the OP wants pretty print. His question is: how do I print e1 and e2. Otherwise the objection about using __repr__ is absolutely correct. The intention of the answer is to point out a better (pythonic) way of printing object values. – cezar Oct 5 '15 at 9:21
1

You should redefine __init__ method. That's because __init__ is called while object initialization.

class Employee:

    def __init__(self, name,age):
        self.name = name
        self.age=age

e1=Employee("xyz",'25')
e2=Employee("abc",'23')
print("Employee Details...")

print("Name:",e1.name,"age:",e1.age)
print("Name:",e2.name,"age:",e2.age)

Edit:

You can use this code to achieve your desired output with a little update.

You can add commas , after print to allow next print statement start at the same line , change the code like that:

    class Employee:

    def __init__(self, name,age):
        self.name = name
        self.age=age

e1=Employee("xyz",'25')
e2=Employee("abc",'23')
print("Employee Details:"),

print("Name:",e1.name,"age:",e1.age),
print("Name:",e2.name,"age:",e2.age)

Output:

Employee Details: (' Name:', 'xyz', 'age:'25') (' Name:', 'abc', 'age:'23')
| improve this answer | |
  • This is probably what the OP is actually trying to do. – PM 2Ring Oct 5 '15 at 9:05

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