I'm trying to modify an Order, but I always get Error #1.

From my research, I have discovered that error 1 means I have input parameter in a wrong way. How can I fix my OrderModify() function?

    stoploss = NormalizeDouble(Ask - Point * TrailingStop,Digits);
    int ticket;
    takeprofit = NormalizeDouble(Ask + Point * TrailingStopTP,Digits);
    double minstoplevel = MarketInfo( Symbol(), MODE_STOPLEVEL );
    if(stoploss > NormalizeDouble(Ask - Point*minstoplevel,Digits)) {
        stoploss = NormalizeDouble(Ask - Point*minstoplevel,Digits);
    }
    if(takeprofit < NormalizeDouble( Ask + Point*minstoplevel2, Digits )) {
        takeprofit = NormalizeDouble( Ask + Point*minstoplevel2, Digits );
    }
    if(AccountFreeMarginCheck(Symbol(),OP_SELL,lotsize)>0) {
        ticket=OrderSend(Symbol(),OP_BUY,lotsize,Ask, 0, 0.0, 0.0, "comment", MagicNumber, 0, Lime);
        if(ticket<0) {
            Print("Order send failed with error #",GetLastError());       
        } else {
            Print("Order send sucesso!! Ticket#", ticket);
            res=OrderModify(ticket,OrderOpenPrice(),stoploss,takeprofit,0,Blue);
            if(res==false) {
                Print("Error modifying order!, error#",GetLastError());
            } else {
                Print("Order modified successfully, res#", res);
            }            
        }
    } else {
        Print("Sem dinheiro na conta D=");
    }
 }
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Not exactly "wrong", OrderModify() legally sets _LastError == 1

There might be a bit surprise, but OrderModify() has an obligation to signal _LastError == 1 in case, the call was both syntactically and semantically correct, however, the values supplied for modification(s) were actually the very same, as the identified ticket# has already had in database.

This means, there was nothing to modify, as all the attributes already had the "quasi-new" target value(s).

One may pre-check all fields for a potential identity, which might allow our code to skip the OrderModify() call in this very case of an identity-of-{ current | target } values.

ERR_NO_RESULT == 1               // No error returned, but the result is unknown

GetLastError() - returns a last generated error-code. The same value is available via a system variable named _LastError. It's value can be reset before a critical activity to zero by calling ResetLastError().

Error codes are defined in stderror.mqh.

To print the error description you can use the ErrorDescription() function, defined in stdlib.mqh file

#include <stderror.mqh>
#include <stdlib.mqh>
  • hm, I don't think this is the case. Because It's already checking it with minstoplevel – Filipe Ferminiano Oct 5 '15 at 11:41
  • What do you try to state, Filipe? An error in common sense is reported by ( OrderModify() == False && _LastError != ERR_NO_RESULT ). Detail diagnostic + logging typically follow this situation, not an ERR_NO_RESULT singularity case. Is it clearer or did I miss something? – user3666197 Oct 5 '15 at 11:48

The problem is that even though the entry price, stoploss, and take profit parameters to the OrderModify() call appear to be the same, they likely differ by a fraction of a unit ( smaller than "Digits" ).

To fix this,
simply normalize the parameters to make sure they are a maximum of Digits decimal places long.

double entryPrice = NormalizeDouble( entryPrice, Digits );
double stoploss   = NormalizeDouble( stoploss,   Digits );
double target     = NormalizeDouble( target,     Digits );

Then pass them into the OrderModify() call.

  • With all due respect, this is not correct, sir. The call to NormalizeDouble() is out of question not the reason for _LastError == ERROR_NO_RESULT. For details ref. to (cit.:) "There might be a bit surprise, but OrderModify() has an obligation to signal _LastError == 1 in case, the call was both syntactically and semantically correct, however, the values supplied for modification(s) were actually the very same, as the identified ticket# has already had in database." You might already want to update your answer to better reflect the reality of the O/P posted problem. – user3666197 Jan 18 '17 at 7:53

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