I have the following enum.

enum EstimateItemStatus: Printable {
    case Pending
    case OnHold
    case Done

    var description: String {
        switch self {
        case .Pending: return "Pending"
        case .OnHold: return "On Hold"
        case .Done: return "Done"
        }
    }

    init?(id : Int) {
        switch id {
        case 1:
            self = .Pending
        case 2:
            self = .OnHold
        case 3:
            self = .Done
        default:
            return nil
        }
    }
}

I need to get all the raw values as an array of strings (like so ["Pending", "On Hold", "Done"]).

I added this method to the enum.

func toArray() -> [String] {
    var n = 1
    return Array(
        GeneratorOf<EstimateItemStatus> {
            return EstimateItemStatus(id: n++)!.description
        }
    )
}

But I'm getting the following error.

Cannot find an initializer for type 'GeneratorOf' that accepts an argument list of type '(() -> _)'

I can't figure out how to resolve this. Any help? Or please tell me if there is an easier/better/more elegant way to do this.

Thank you.

  • 2
    you can create array like let array : [EstimateItemStatus] = [.Pending, .Onhold, .Done] – Kristijan Delivuk Oct 5 '15 at 15:41
  • 1
    @KristijanDelivuk I want to add this functionality to the enum itself. So I don't have to go and add it everywhere in other places of the codebases if I ever add another value to the enum. – Isuru Oct 5 '15 at 15:47
  • Possible duplicate of How to enumerate an enum with String type? – Mark May 1 '17 at 0:19
  • I have an answer you can refer to here stackoverflow.com/a/48960126/5372480 – MSimic May 16 at 20:01
up vote 9 down vote accepted

I found somewhere this code:

protocol EnumCollection : Hashable {}


extension EnumCollection {

    static func cases() -> AnySequence<Self> {
        typealias S = Self
        return AnySequence { () -> AnyIterator<S> in
            var raw = 0
            return AnyIterator {
                let current : Self = withUnsafePointer(to: &raw) { $0.withMemoryRebound(to: S.self, capacity: 1) { $0.pointee }
                }
                guard current.hashValue == raw else { return nil }
                raw += 1
                return current
            }
        }
    }
}

Use:

enum YourEnum: EnumCollection { //code }

YourEnum.cases()

return list of cases from YourEnum

  • Seems like a great solution but has quite a few compile errors on Swift 4. – Isuru Sep 28 '17 at 3:58
  • @Isuru I didn't test this code on Swift 4 – Daniel Kuta Sep 28 '17 at 5:17
  • 1
    Swift 4 here: stackoverflow.com/a/32429125/6444 – mxcl Nov 24 '17 at 19:16
  • 1
    The "somewhere" may be: theswiftdev.com/2017/10/12/swift-enum-all-values (among others?). The blogger credits CoreKit. – AmitaiB Apr 10 at 21:14
  • 3
    This breaks in XCode 10 (regardless of Swift-version) as the hashValue of an enum no longer incremental but random, breaking the mechanism. The new way to do this is to upgrade to Swift 4.2 and use CaseIterable – Yasper Sep 20 at 12:48

For Swift 4.2 (Xcode 10) and later

There's a CaseIterable protocol:

enum EstimateItemStatus: String, CaseIterable {
    case pending = "Pending"
    case onHold = "OnHold"
    case done = "Done"

    init?(id : Int) {
        switch id {
        case 1: self = .pending
        case 2: self = .onHold
        case 3: self = .done
        default: return nil
        }
    }
}

for value in EstimateItemStatus.allCases {
    print(value)
}

For Swift < 4.2

No, you can't query an enum for what values it contains. See this article. You have to define an array that list all the values you have. Also check out Frank Valbuena's clever solution.

enum EstimateItemStatus: String {
    case Pending = "Pending"
    case OnHold = "OnHold"
    case Done = "Done"

    static let allValues = [Pending, OnHold, Done]

    init?(id : Int) {
        switch id {
        case 1:
            self = .Pending
        case 2:
            self = .OnHold
        case 3:
            self = .Done
        default:
            return nil
        }
    }
}

for value in EstimateItemStatus.allValues {
    print(value)
}

Swift 4.2 introduces a new protocol named CaseIterable

enum Fruit : CaseIterable {
    case apple , apricot , orange, lemon
}

that when you conforms to , you can get an array from the enum cases like this

for fruit in Fruit.allCases {
    print("I like eating \(fruit).")
}

There's another way that at least is safe at compile time:

enum MyEnum {
    case case1
    case case2
    case case3
}

extension MyEnum {
    static var allValues: [MyEnum] {
        var allValues: [MyEnum] = []
        switch (MyEnum.case1) {
        case .case1: allValues.append(.case1); fallthrough
        case .case2: allValues.append(.case2); fallthrough
        case .case3: allValues.append(.case3)
        }
        return allValues
    }
}

Notice that this works for any enum type (RawRepresentable or not) and also if you add a new case then you will get a compiler error which is good since will force you to have this up to date.

  • Unorthodox, but it works and it warns you if you modify the enum cases. Clever solution! – Chuck Krutsinger Apr 12 at 21:13

For Swift 2

// Found http://stackoverflow.com/questions/24007461/how-to-enumerate-an-enum-with-string-type
func iterateEnum<T where T: Hashable, T: RawRepresentable>(_: T.Type) -> AnyGenerator<T> {
    var i = 0
    return AnyGenerator {
        let next = withUnsafePointer(&i) {
            UnsafePointer<T>($0).memory
        }
        if next.hashValue == i {
            i += 1
            return next
        } else {
            return nil
        }
    }
}

func arrayEnum<T where T: Hashable, T: RawRepresentable>(type: T.Type) -> [T]{
    return Array(iterateEnum(type))
}

To use it:

arrayEnum(MyEnumClass.self)
  • Why would the elements' hashValue be 0..n? – NRitH Jul 1 '17 at 3:51

After inspiration from Sequence and hours of try n errors. I finally got this comfortable and beautiful Swift 4 way on Xcode 9.1:

protocol EnumSequenceElement: Strideable {
    var rawValue: Int { get }
    init?(rawValue: Int)
}

extension EnumSequenceElement {
    func distance(to other: Self) -> Int {
        return other.rawValue - rawValue
    }

    func advanced(by n: Int) -> Self {
        return Self(rawValue: n + rawValue) ?? self
    }
}

struct EnumSequence<T: EnumSequenceElement>: Sequence, IteratorProtocol {
    typealias Element = T

    var current: Element? = T.init(rawValue: 0)

    mutating func next() -> Element? {
        defer {
            if let current = current {
                self.current = T.init(rawValue: current.rawValue + 1)
            }
        }
        return current
    }
}

Usage:

enum EstimateItemStatus: Int, EnumSequenceElement, CustomStringConvertible {
    case Pending
    case OnHold
    case Done

    var description: String {
        switch self {
        case .Pending:
            return "Pending"
        case .OnHold:
            return "On Hold"
        case .Done:
            return "Done"
        }
    }
}

for status in EnumSequence<EstimateItemStatus>() {
    print(status)
}
// Or by countable range iteration
for status: EstimateItemStatus in .Pending ... .Done {
    print(status)
}

Output:

Pending
On Hold
Done

You Can Use

enum Status: Int{
    case a
    case b
    case c

}

extension RawRepresentable where Self.RawValue == Int {

    static var values: [Self] {
        var values: [Self] = []
        var index = 1
        while let element = self.init(rawValue: index) {
            values.append(element)
            index += 1
        }
        return values
    }
}


Status.values.forEach { (st) in
    print(st)
}
  • Nice! After upgrading from Swift 3.2 to 4.1 this was a solution that I used. We originally had AnyItertor<Self> declarations. Your solution was much cleaner and easier to read. thanks! – Nick N Nov 23 at 17:26
  • One code flaw here though. It misses the first item in the case. Change var index = 1 to var index = 0 – Nick N Nov 26 at 18:28

If your enum is incremental and associated with numbers, you can use range of numbers that you map to enum values, like so:

// Swift 3
enum EstimateItemStatus: Int {
    case pending = 1,
    onHold
    done
}

let estimateItemStatusValues: [EstimateItemStatus?] = (EstimateItemStatus.pending.rawValue...EstimateItemStatus.done.rawValue).map { EstimateItemStatus(rawValue: $0) }

This doesn't quite work with enums associated with strings or anything other than numbers, but it works great if that is the case!

Details

Xcode 9.1, Swift 4

Solution

protocol EnumIterator {
    static func getItem(at index: Int) -> Self?
}

extension Array where Element: EnumIterator {

    static var all: [Element] {
        var result = [Element]()
        var index = 0
        while true {
            if let item = Element.getItem(at: index) {
                result.append(item)
                index += 1
            } else {
                break
            }
        }
        return result
    }
}

Usage

enum

enum Enum: EnumIterator  {
    case val1, val2, val3

    static func getItem(at index: Int) -> Enum? {
        switch index {
        case 0: return .val1
        case 1: return .val2
        case 2: return .val3
        default: return nil
        }
    }
}

Array with all enum values

 let array = [Enum].all

Full sample

Do not forget to insert the solution code here

import UIKit

class ViewController: UIViewController {

    override func viewDidLoad() {
        super.viewDidLoad()

        let array1 = [Enum].all
        print("\(array1)")

        let array2 = [StringEnum].all
        print("\(array2)")
    }
}

enum Enum: EnumIterator  {
    case val1, val2, val3

    static func getItem(at index: Int) -> Enum? {
        switch index {
        case 0: return .val1
        case 1: return .val2
        case 2: return .val3
        default: return nil
        }
    }
}

enum StringEnum: String, EnumIterator  {
    case str1="str1", str2="str2", str3="str3"

    static func getItem(at index: Int) -> StringEnum? {
        switch index {
        case 0: return .str1
        case 1: return .str2
        case 2: return .str3
        default: return nil
        }
    }
}

Results

enter image description here


enter image description here


enter image description here

Your Answer

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.