126

How do I check to see if an Application Setting is available?

i.e. app.config

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8" ?>
<configuration>
  <appSettings>
    <add key ="someKey" value="someValue"/>
  </appSettings>
</configuration>

and in the codefile

if (ConfigurationManager.AppSettings.ContainsKey("someKey"))
{
  // Do Something
}else{
  // Do Something Else
}
191

MSDN: Configuration Manager.AppSettings

if (ConfigurationManager.AppSettings[name] != null)
{
// Now do your magic..
}

or

string s = ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["myKey"];
if (!String.IsNullOrEmpty(s))
{
    // Key exists
}
else
{
    // Key doesn't exist
}
  • 2
    We have a SQL-like IsNull function in our library which makes retrieving a setting very handy: Dim configValue As String = Util.IsNull(ConfigurationManager.AppSettings.Get("SettingName"), String.Empty) – Eirik H May 16 '13 at 7:00
  • 7
    It throws "Object reference not set to an instance of an object" – Waqar Alamgir Jun 3 '13 at 8:14
  • No, it's wrong. If "myKey" does not exists in the app settings xml node, the code thrown an exception. – Gionata Jun 27 '16 at 10:41
  • if you check for IsNullOrEmpty then your logic for "key doesn't exist" will run when you actually have a key with a blank string value as a valid setting – nrjohnstone Jul 7 '16 at 9:28
  • 3
    not the best answer as this throws exceptions. Divyesh Patel is a better solution. – VRPF Oct 18 '16 at 6:46
65
if (ConfigurationManager.AppSettings.AllKeys.Contains("myKey"))
{
    // Key exists
}
else
{
    // Key doesn't exist
}
  • This would probably be slightly more efficient (?) if you had no desire to use the value afterwards. The question specifically mentions testing 'if an Application Setting is available'. Since Availability implies a desire to use it in my mind, I'd say the answer provided by user195488 will be more useful to people coming here - but strictly speaking, your answer is also correct. – Code Jockey Sep 11 '14 at 19:09
  • 7
    This is a far better solution for the simple fact that it is actually checking if the key exists. If I have blank value for my key, the solution provided by user195488 would give me a false positive. – dyslexicanaboko Sep 30 '14 at 19:40
  • 4
    This solution is incorrect. AppSettings is a NameValueCollection which by default is case-insensitive when it comes to key lookups. The LINQ .Contains extension method you're using here however will default to a case-sensitive comparison. – Jax Jun 4 '15 at 19:00
  • 2
    This worked for me when the accepted answer did not (user195488's) – Tom Cerul May 11 '16 at 21:00
7

Safely returned default value via generics and LINQ.

public T ReadAppSetting<T>(string searchKey, T defaultValue, StringComparison compare = StringComparison.Ordinal)
{
    if (ConfigurationManager.AppSettings.AllKeys.Any(key => string.Compare(key, searchKey, compare) == 0)) {
        try
        { // see if it can be converted.
            var converter = TypeDescriptor.GetConverter(typeof(T));
            if (converter != null) defaultValue = (T)converter.ConvertFromString(ConfigurationManager.AppSettings.GetValues(searchKey).First());
        }
        catch { } // nothing to do just return the defaultValue
    }
    return defaultValue;
}

Used as follows:

string LogFileName = ReadAppSetting("LogFile","LogFile");
double DefaultWidth = ReadAppSetting("Width",1280.0);
double DefaultHeight = ReadAppSetting("Height",1024.0);
Color DefaultColor = ReadAppSetting("Color",Colors.Black);
  • ConfigurationManager.AppSettings is not case-sensitive, Any(key => key == MyKey however is – janv8000 Dec 19 '18 at 14:12
  • @janv8000 I wanted case sensitivity, but updated the example to handle it. – codebender Dec 19 '18 at 21:47
  • Proper case-insensitive comparisons are faster with ToUpper (see stackoverflow.com/a/12137/389424). Even beter is to use the string.Equals() overload passing a StringComparisonType. – janv8000 Dec 20 '18 at 6:02
  • @janv8000 updated per suggestion. – codebender Dec 20 '18 at 22:49
2

If the key you are looking for isn't present in the config file, you won't be able to convert it to a string with .ToString() because the value will be null and you'll get an "Object reference not set to an instance of an object" error. It's best to first see if the value exists before trying to get the string representation.

if (!String.IsNullOrEmpty(ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["myKey"]))
{
    String myKey = ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["myKey"].ToString();
}

Or, as Code Monkey suggested:

if (ConfigurationSettings.AppSettings["myKey"] != null)
{
// Now do your magic..
}
2

Upper options gives flexible to all manner, if you know key type try parsing them bool.TryParse(ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["myKey"], out myvariable);

2

I think the LINQ expression may be best:

   const string MyKey = "myKey"

   if (ConfigurationManager.AppSettings.AllKeys.Any(key => key == MyKey))
          {
              // Key exists
          }
  • sure... but idunno - is there any advantage to this method? If I'm REALLY well versed in Linq (which most C# programmers probably eventually will be), then it would probably be as easy to read this example, but I don't think it would ever be easier - so unless there's an efficiency advantage... why? – Code Jockey Sep 11 '14 at 19:12
  • no efficiency advantage and syntactically verbose imo. – John Nicholas Oct 6 '15 at 14:51
  • ConfigurationManager.AppSettings is not case-sensitive, Any(key => key == MyKey however is – janv8000 Dec 19 '18 at 14:10
2

var isAlaCarte = ConfigurationManager.AppSettings.AllKeys.Contains("IsALaCarte") && bool.Parse(ConfigurationManager.AppSettings.Get("IsALaCarte"));

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