409

I've noticed the following code is legal in Python. My question is why? Is there a specific reason?

n = 5
while n != 0:
    print n
    n -= 1
else:
    print "what the..."

Many beginners accidentally stumble on this syntax when they try to put an if/else block inside of a while or for loop, and don't indent the else properly. The solution is to make sure the else block lines up with the if, assuming that it was your intent to pair them. This question explains why it didn't cause a syntax error, and what the resulting code means. See also I'm getting an IndentationError. How do I fix it?, for the cases where there is a syntax error reported.

See also Why does python use 'else' after for and while loops? for questions about how to make good use of the feature.

10
  • 13
    @detly: That's because most people avoid this construct. :) I believe Guido mentioned during the Py3k process that, at the very least, the choice of the word else for this use had been a remarkably bad idea, and that they wouldn't be doing any more of these. Jul 21, 2010 at 8:26
  • 6
    @Nicholas Knight - yeah, tempting though it is, it'd probably be something only I understood on first glance. Any other poor sap would have to go and look at the language spec, or go back in time and post a question here on Sta- heeeeey...
    – detly
    Jul 21, 2010 at 8:43
  • 9
    The idea behind choosing 'else' is that this construct is supposedly often used in conjunction with an 'if X: break' inside the while loop. Since the 'else' clause is executed if we don't break out of the loop, it forms a kinda-sorta 'else' to the 'if'. Nov 22, 2013 at 10:25
  • 22
    They should rename it after:.
    – naught101
    Mar 14, 2016 at 22:42
  • 6
    @naught101 - After isn't really appropriate either, because it wouldn't execute if you used "break" or "return" to exit the loop. I always tell people who are struggling to remember the usage, "If you're breaking out of the loop, you have an opportunity to do something right before your break statement. If you're exhausting your collection (in a for loop) or breaking your loop condition (in a while loop), the 'else' clause is your place to wrap up."
    – AusIV
    Jun 20, 2016 at 16:17

13 Answers 13

483

The else clause is only executed when your while condition becomes false. If you break out of the loop, or if an exception is raised, it won't be executed.

One way to think about it is as an if/else construct with respect to the condition:

if condition:
    handle_true()
else:
    handle_false()

is analogous to the looping construct:

while condition:
    handle_true()
else:
    # condition is false now, handle and go on with the rest of the program
    handle_false()

An example might be along the lines of:

while value < threshold:
    if not process_acceptable_value(value):
        # something went wrong, exit the loop; don't pass go, don't collect 200
        break
    value = update(value)
else:
    # value >= threshold; pass go, collect 200
    handle_threshold_reached()
5
  • 81
    "The else clause is only executed when your while condition becomes false." The wording here implies that your while state goes from a state of true to false and than the else will be executed. However, if the while is never true, the else clause will still be executed.
    – user597608
    Oct 10, 2014 at 21:11
  • 2
    pseudocode So correct me if I'm wrong, but this is exactly the same as while {} something except that the something will be skipped if you break in the while loop. Mar 18, 2015 at 21:48
  • 2
    Maybe the most precise pseudocode would be: while(True) { if (cond) { handle_true(); } else { handle_false(); break; } }
    – VinGarcia
    Dec 5, 2016 at 14:46
  • 1
    the else clause is NOT executed even if the while condition becomes false, if the while loop is finished with 'break'. For example, changing the condition to false before break. Aug 5, 2020 at 2:30
  • 1
    If break executes, then the condition never evaluated to false. (It's possible that the context became such that the condition would evaluated to false, if it were reached again, but that's not the same as evaluating to false.)
    – chepner
    Jan 22, 2023 at 1:37
144

The else clause is executed if you exit a block normally, by hitting the loop condition or falling off the bottom of a try block. It is not executed if you break or return out of a block, or raise an exception. It works for not only while and for loops, but also try blocks.

You typically find it in places where normally you would exit a loop early, and running off the end of the loop is an unexpected/unusual occasion. For example, if you're looping through a list looking for a value:

for value in values:
    if value == 5:
        print "Found it!"
        break
else:
    print "Nowhere to be found. :-("
2
  • 6
    Actually a fairly useful construct for such a thing. Don't know how many times I've put found_it=False at the start of a loop, and then do an if check on found_it at the end
    – Cruncher
    Feb 19, 2020 at 18:51
  • This is a better explanation that the one above which says, "The else clause is only executed when your while condition becomes false". If you while condition becomes false but you call "break" before you loop, the else clause will not be called. It's not enough for the while condition to become false, you also have to execute that condition.
    – Eyal
    Sep 8, 2023 at 23:00
43

Allow me to give an example on why to use this else-clause. But:

  • my point is now better explained in Leo’s answer
  • I use a for- instead of a while-loop, but else works similar (executes unless break was encountered)
  • there are better ways to do this (e.g. wrapping it into a function or raising an exception)
Breaking out of multiple levels of looping

Here is how it works: the outer loop has a break at the end, so it would only be executed once. However, if the inner loop completes (finds no divisor), then it reaches the else statement and the outer break is never reached. This way, a break in the inner loop will break out of both loops, rather than just one.

for k in [2, 3, 5, 7, 11, 13, 17, 25]:
    for m in range(2, 10):
        if k == m:
            continue
        print 'trying %s %% %s' % (k, m)
        if k % m == 0:
            print 'found a divisor: %d %% %d; breaking out of loop' % (k, m)
            break
    else:
        continue
    print 'breaking another level of loop'
    break
else:
    print 'no divisor could be found!'
0
30

The else-clause is executed when the while-condition evaluates to false.

From the documentation:

The while statement is used for repeated execution as long as an expression is true:

while_stmt ::=  "while" expression ":" suite
                ["else" ":" suite]

This repeatedly tests the expression and, if it is true, executes the first suite; if the expression is false (which may be the first time it is tested) the suite of the else clause, if present, is executed and the loop terminates.

A break statement executed in the first suite terminates the loop without executing the else clause’s suite. A continue statement executed in the first suite skips the rest of the suite and goes back to testing the expression.

25

The else clause is only executed when the while-condition becomes false.

Here are some examples:

Example 1: Initially the condition is false, so else-clause is executed.

i = 99999999

while i < 5:
    print(i)
    i += 1
else:
    print('this')

OUTPUT:

this

Example 2: The while-condition i < 5 never became false because i == 3 breaks the loop, so else-clause was not executed.

i = 0

while i < 5:
    print(i)
    if i == 3:
        break
    i += 1
else:
    print('this')

OUTPUT:

0
1
2
3

Example 3: The while-condition i < 5 became false when i was 5, so else-clause was executed.

i = 0

while i < 5:
    print(i)
    i += 1
else:
    print('this')

OUTPUT:

0
1
2
3
4
this
23

My answer will focus on WHEN we can use while/for-else.

At the first glance, it seems there is no different when using

while CONDITION:
    EXPRESSIONS
print 'ELSE'
print 'The next statement'

and

while CONDITION:
    EXPRESSIONS
else:
    print 'ELSE'
print 'The next statement'

Because the print 'ELSE' statement seems always executed in both cases (both when the while loop finished or not run).

Then, it's only different when the statement print 'ELSE' will not be executed. It's when there is a breakinside the code block under while

In [17]: i = 0

In [18]: while i < 5:
    print i
    if i == 2:
        break
    i = i +1
else:
    print 'ELSE'
print 'The next statement'
   ....:
0
1
2
The next statement

If differ to:

In [19]: i = 0

In [20]: while i < 5:
    print i
    if i == 2:
        break
    i = i +1
print 'ELSE'
print 'The next statement'
   ....:
0
1
2
ELSE
The next statement

return is not in this category, because it does the same effect for two above cases.

exception raise also does not cause difference, because when it raises, where the next code will be executed is in exception handler (except block), the code in else clause or right after the while clause will not be executed.

13

I know this is old question but...

As Raymond Hettinger said, it should be called while/no_break instead of while/else.
I find it easy to understeand if you look at this snippet.

n = 5
while n > 0:
    print n
    n -= 1
    if n == 2:
        break
if n == 0:
    print n

Now instead of checking condition after while loop we can swap it with else and get rid of that check.

n = 5
while n > 0:
    print n
    n -= 1
    if n == 2:
        break
else:  # read it as "no_break"
    print n

I always read it as while/no_break to understand the code and that syntax makes much more sense to me.

2

Else is executed if while loop did not break.

I kinda like to think of it with a 'runner' metaphor.

The "else" is like crossing the finish line, irrelevant of whether you started at the beginning or end of the track. "else" is only not executed if you break somewhere in between.

runner_at = 0 # or 10 makes no difference, if unlucky_sector is not 0-10
unlucky_sector = 6
while runner_at < 10:
    print("Runner at: ", runner_at)
    if runner_at == unlucky_sector:
        print("Runner fell and broke his foot. Will not reach finish.")
        break
    runner_at += 1
else:
    print("Runner has finished the race!") # Not executed if runner broke his foot.

Main use cases is using this breaking out of nested loops or if you want to run some statements only if loop didn't break somewhere (think of breaking being an unusual situation).

For example, the following is a mechanism on how to break out of an inner loop without using variables or try/catch:

for i in [1,2,3]:
    for j in ['a', 'unlucky', 'c']:
        print(i, j)
        if j == 'unlucky':
            break
    else: 
        continue  # Only executed if inner loop didn't break.
    break         # This is only reached if inner loop 'breaked' out since continue didn't run. 

print("Finished")
# 1 a
# 1 b
# Finished
2
thing = 'hay'
while thing:
  if thing == 'needle':
    print('I found it!!')  # wrap up for break
    break
  thing = haystack.next()
else:
  print('I did not find it.')  # wrap up for no-break

The possibly unfortunately named else-clause is your place to wrap up from loop-exhaustion without break.

  • if there is nothing to do in that case, no else-clause is necessary
  • you break with return or raise → the entire code after the call or try is your no-break place instead
  • instead of else you could set a default before while (e.g. found = False)
    • but it invites bugs related to the handling of the default
    • an else-clause saves you from those bugs

If you use a multiple breaks with non-trivial wrap-up, you should use a simple assignment before break, an else-clause assignment for no-break, and an if-elif-else or match-case to avoid repeating non-trival break handling code.

Note: everything above also applies to for thing in haystack:

-1

The else: statement is executed when and only when the while loop no longer meets its condition (in your example, when n != 0 is false).

So the output would be this:

5
4
3
2
1
what the...
4
  • I know but this kind of while/else doesn't work in Java. I find it quite interesting when I figured out it works in Python. I was just curious and wanted to know the technical reason.
    – Ivan
    Jul 21, 2010 at 2:57
  • 7
    @Ivan: It's not so much that it doesn't work in Java but that it doesn't exist in Java. It could be made to work, if someone cared to add it to the language. Jul 21, 2010 at 7:52
  • 1
    No, while False: .. else .. still runs the else clause. It's more accurate to say: else is only not ran if loop is broken out of. Jul 29, 2019 at 4:11
  • The else part is also not ran if there is a return or an exception is raised.
    – John
    Dec 5, 2021 at 2:20
-1

Suppose you've to search an element x in a single linked list

    def search(self, x):
        position = 1
        p =self.start
        while p is not None:
            if p.info == x:
                print(x, " is at position ", position)
                return True
            position += 1
            p = p.link
        else:
            print(x, "not found in list") 
            return False

So if while conditions fails else will execute, hope it helps!

4
  • Omitting the else: clause of the while statement in this snippet doesn’t change the behavior of the code.
    – sleighty
    May 24, 2021 at 2:48
  • @BrunoEly this code is a snippet of a single linked list program, so you need a whole code to run it accurately.
    – Rahul Negi
    May 25, 2021 at 13:07
  • 3
    You miss my point. I'm trying to say an else: clause after a while block that has no break statement is pointless-- it does not alter the behavior of the code.
    – sleighty
    May 27, 2021 at 9:38
  • Yeah, I got it, IDK how I misinterpreted that time(my bad). even with a break statement else will not execute though.
    – Rahul Negi
    Jan 21, 2023 at 12:17
-2

The better use of 'while: else:' construction in Python should be if no loop is executed in 'while' then the 'else' statement is executed. The way it works today doesn't make sense because you can use the code below with the same results...

n = 5
while n != 0:
    print n
    n -= 1
print "what the..."
2
  • 10
    No, the difference is that the else block will not be executed if you are leaving loop using break or return keyword. In your example, print will be executed also if loop has ended on break command. Oct 21, 2013 at 16:43
  • 4
    You describe how most people wish that the feature worked, not how it actually works!
    – dotancohen
    Feb 29, 2016 at 9:42
-2

As far as I know the main reason for adding else to loops in any language is in cases when the iterator is not on in your control. Imagine the iterator is on a server and you just give it a signal to fetch the next 100 records of data. You want the loop to go on as long as the length of the data received is 100. If it is less, you need it to go one more times and then end it. There are many other situations where you have no control over the last iteration. Having the option to add an else in these cases makes everything much easier.

1
  • The only times the else: clause doesn’t run is when you break out of the loop, so this example doesn’t call for such a construct. I.e., whatever code would be inside the else: block may doesn’t need an else: statement (for this example).
    – sleighty
    May 24, 2021 at 2:51

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