49

MySQL's UUID function returns a UUIDv1 GUID. I'm looking for an easy way to generate random GUIDs (i.e. UUIDv4) in SQL.

1
  • Will you be creating these values in multiple connections at the "same" time? Or do you have some other purpose in mind?
    – Rick James
    Commented May 2, 2020 at 19:50

5 Answers 5

76

I've spent quite some time looking for a solution and came up with the following mysql function that generates a random UUID (i.e. UUIDv4) using standard MySQL functions. I'm answering my own question to share that in the hope that it'll be useful.

-- Change delimiter so that the function body doesn't end the function declaration
DELIMITER //

CREATE FUNCTION uuid_v4()
    RETURNS CHAR(36) NO SQL
BEGIN
    -- Generate 8 2-byte strings that we will combine into a UUIDv4
    SET @h1 = LPAD(HEX(FLOOR(RAND() * 0xffff)), 4, '0');
    SET @h2 = LPAD(HEX(FLOOR(RAND() * 0xffff)), 4, '0');
    SET @h3 = LPAD(HEX(FLOOR(RAND() * 0xffff)), 4, '0');
    SET @h6 = LPAD(HEX(FLOOR(RAND() * 0xffff)), 4, '0');
    SET @h7 = LPAD(HEX(FLOOR(RAND() * 0xffff)), 4, '0');
    SET @h8 = LPAD(HEX(FLOOR(RAND() * 0xffff)), 4, '0');

    -- 4th section will start with a 4 indicating the version
    SET @h4 = CONCAT('4', LPAD(HEX(FLOOR(RAND() * 0x0fff)), 3, '0'));

    -- 5th section first half-byte can only be 8, 9 A or B
    SET @h5 = CONCAT(HEX(FLOOR(RAND() * 4 + 8)),
                LPAD(HEX(FLOOR(RAND() * 0x0fff)), 3, '0'));

    -- Build the complete UUID
    RETURN LOWER(CONCAT(
        @h1, @h2, '-', @h3, '-', @h4, '-', @h5, '-', @h6, @h7, @h8
    ));
END
//
-- Switch back the delimiter
DELIMITER ;

Note: The pseudo-random number generation used (MySQL's RAND) is not cryptographically secure and thus has some bias which can increase the collision risk.

6
  • 4
    Please note that both answers relies on MySQL RAND() that is NOT cryptographically-safe random number generator. Collisions are expected when using this method. Commented Apr 5, 2020 at 15:13
  • A side note: RAND() repeats after 2^30 calls. See stackoverflow.com/a/58459869/1766831
    – Rick James
    Commented May 2, 2020 at 19:30
  • 2
    @RickJames - is the sequence identical for all machines or is it machine-dependent? 3.1^13 is the number of microseconds in a year, which would imply that if you generated 1 UUID every microsecond, it would take ~ 2^17 years to exhaust RAND() (if my maths is correct - I've approximated 3.1 ~ 2 for this "back of coaster" calculation). This is over a million times the current estimated age of the universe - how relevant is this number in real life?
    – Vérace
    Commented Jun 15, 2020 at 16:08
  • @RickJames However, RAND() generates a 16 digit decimal fraction - so it would seem that it has to repeat values every 1000 years or so - but, that's not the same as repeating the values in a sequence - but again, relevance comes into play - no?
    – Vérace
    Commented Jun 15, 2020 at 16:15
  • 1
    Since this is a non-deterministic function, later versions of MySQL may throw an error when you try to define it because it fails a security check. You need to add NO SQL after the RETURNS clause to tell MySQL that this function doesn't contain any SQL statements. Commented Nov 2, 2020 at 18:25
40

Both existing answers rely on MySQL RAND() function:

RAND() is not meant to be a perfect random generator. It is a fast way to generate random numbers on demand that is portable between platforms for the same MySQL version.

In practice, this means that the UUID generated using this function might (and will) be biased, and collisions can occur more frequently than expected.

Solution

It's possible to generate safe UUID V4 on MySQL side using random_bytes() function:

This function returns a binary string of len random bytes generated using the random number generator of the SSL library.

So we can update the function to:

CREATE FUNCTION uuid_v4s()
    RETURNS CHAR(36)
BEGIN
    -- 1th and 2nd block are made of 6 random bytes
    SET @h1 = HEX(RANDOM_BYTES(4));
    SET @h2 = HEX(RANDOM_BYTES(2));

    -- 3th block will start with a 4 indicating the version, remaining is random
    SET @h3 = SUBSTR(HEX(RANDOM_BYTES(2)), 2, 3);

    -- 4th block first nibble can only be 8, 9 A or B, remaining is random
    SET @h4 = CONCAT(HEX(FLOOR(ASCII(RANDOM_BYTES(1)) / 64)+8),
                SUBSTR(HEX(RANDOM_BYTES(2)), 2, 3));

    -- 5th block is made of 6 random bytes
    SET @h5 = HEX(RANDOM_BYTES(6));

    -- Build the complete UUID
    RETURN LOWER(CONCAT(
        @h1, '-', @h2, '-4', @h3, '-', @h4, '-', @h5
    ));
END

This should generate UUID V4 random enough to not care about collisions.

NOTE: Unfortunately, MariaDB doesn't support RANDOM_BYTES() (See https://mariadb.com/kb/en/function-differences-between-mariadb-105-and-mysql-80/#miscellaneous)

Test

I've created the following test scenario: Insert random UUID v4 as primary key for a table until 40.000.000 rows are created. When a collision is found, the row is updated incrementing collisions column:

INSERT INTO test (uuid) VALUES (uuid_v4()) ON DUPLICATE KEY UPDATE collisions=collisions+1;

The sum of collisions after 40 million rows with each function is:

+----------+----------------+
| RAND()   | RANDOM_BYTES() |
+----------+----------------+
|       55 |              0 |
+----------+----------------+

The number collisions in both scenarios tends to increase as number of rows grows.

10
  • 2
    Thanks for the cryptographically secure version ; sadly RANDOM_BYTES is not available in MariaDB (10.5).
    – svvac
    Commented May 3, 2020 at 9:21
  • 1
    I'll update the answer to contain this note. I really don't understand why MariaDB removed it. Commented May 3, 2020 at 9:53
  • 2
    Great answer, but there are two minor issues: (1) Since this is a non-deterministic function, later versions of MySQL may throw an error when you try to define it because it fails a security check. You need to add NO SQL after the RETURNS clause to tell MySQL that this function doesn't contain any SQL statements. (2) You're missing the final trailing semicolon. :) Commented Nov 2, 2020 at 18:24
  • 1
    @AlvinThompson I don't think NO SQL is correct here, based on MySQL Docs example: "CONTAINS SQL indicates that the routine does not contain statements that read or write data. This is the default if none of these characteristics is given explicitly. Examples of such statements are SET @x = 1 or DO RELEASE_LOCK('abc'), which execute but neither read nor write data." The function does contain sql statements, but statements neither reads or writes data. The SQL statements are indeed not deterministic however which may affect replication based on your binlog_mode. Commented Nov 17, 2020 at 14:50
  • 2
    @NormanBreau I read that as well, but my vanilla install of mysql (8.0.22) won't allow me to add the function without adding some characteristics. Explicitly adding CONTAINS SQL also doesn't work, giving the same error. The only remaining choices are DETERMINISTIC, which clearly would be incorrect here, READS SQL DATA, which is also inappropriate because this function doesn't read data, or NO SQL. I chose NO SQL because it seemed the most appropriate of the options. Is there another option I missed? Commented Nov 18, 2020 at 17:09
31

Adaptation of Elias Soares's answer using RANDOM_BYTES without creating a DB function:

SELECT LOWER(CONCAT(
    HEX(RANDOM_BYTES(4)), '-',
    HEX(RANDOM_BYTES(2)), '-4',
    SUBSTR(HEX(RANDOM_BYTES(2)), 2, 3), '-',
    CONCAT(HEX(FLOOR(ASCII(RANDOM_BYTES(1)) / 64)+8),SUBSTR(HEX(RANDOM_BYTES(2)), 2, 3)), '-',
    HEX(RANDOM_BYTES(6))
))
5
  • 1
    Every next answer in this thread is better and better. And your version is an ideal match for me) thanks
    – Stalinko
    Commented Mar 2, 2022 at 12:14
  • A thing of beauty - thanks!
    – Andrew
    Commented Mar 15, 2022 at 9:37
  • "Every next answer in this thread is better and better. And your version is an ideal match for me) thanks" - I second that. Fabulous, best SO thread ever!
    – marcus
    Commented Jul 28, 2022 at 14:21
  • Sad that RANDOM_BYTES is not available in Mariadb....
    – Mecanik
    Commented Jan 3, 2023 at 8:51
  • @Mecanik Fortunately, RANDOM_BYTES is available since MariaDB 10.10.0: mariadb.com/kb/en/random_bytes
    – DevDavid
    Commented Feb 18 at 20:28
29

In the off chance you're working with a DB and don't have perms to create functions, here's the same version as above that works just as a SQL expression:

SELECT LOWER(CONCAT(
    LPAD(HEX(FLOOR(RAND() * 0xffff)), 4, '0'), 
    LPAD(HEX(FLOOR(RAND() * 0xffff)), 4, '0'), '-',
    LPAD(HEX(FLOOR(RAND() * 0xffff)), 4, '0'), '-', 
    '4',
    LPAD(HEX(FLOOR(RAND() * 0x0fff)), 3, '0'), '-', 
    HEX(FLOOR(RAND() * 4 + 8)), 
    LPAD(HEX(FLOOR(RAND() * 0x0fff)), 3, '0'), '-', 
    LPAD(HEX(FLOOR(RAND() * 0xffff)), 4, '0'),
    LPAD(HEX(FLOOR(RAND() * 0xffff)), 4, '0'),
    LPAD(HEX(FLOOR(RAND() * 0xffff)), 4, '0')));
3
  • As "above" which? Is this v4? Collision rate??...
    – Mecanik
    Commented Jan 3, 2023 at 8:50
  • @Mecanik yes, it's v4, as you can see by the hardcoded '4' in the format. The collision rate is standard for v4. Nothing special happening here. Commented May 30, 2023 at 14:56
  • Thanks, and in terms of performance? I`m reluctant using it on a larger scale.
    – Mecanik
    Commented May 30, 2023 at 16:22
8

UUID v4

As VARBINARY / BINARY(16):

SELECT RANDOM_BYTES(16) & 0xffffffffffff0fff3fffffffffffffff | 0x00000000000040008000000000000000

As VARCHAR / CHAR(36):

SELECT BIN_TO_UUID(RANDOM_BYTES(16) & 0xffffffffffff0fff3fffffffffffffff | 0x00000000000040008000000000000000)

In CREATE TABLE (require MySQL 8.0.13):

CREATE TABLE `my_table` (
  `binary_uuid` binary(16) NOT NULL DEFAULT (((random_bytes(16) & 0xffffffffffff0fff3fffffffffffffff) | 0x00000000000040008000000000000000)),
  `varchar_uuid` varchar(36) NOT NULL DEFAULT (bin_to_uuid(((random_bytes(16) & 0xffffffffffff0fff3fffffffffffffff) | 0x00000000000040008000000000000000)))
)

Legend:

SELECT BIN_TO_UUID(RANDOM_BYTES(16)
       & 0xffffffffffff0fff3fffffffffffffff
       | 0x00000000000040008000000000000000)
       --   0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1
       --   0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5
       --   ------- --- --- - - -----------
       --      ^     ^   ^  ^ ^      ^
       --      |     |   |  | |      |
       --      |     |   |  | |      +------ node
       --      |     |   |  | +------------- clock_seq_low
       --      |     |   |  +--------------- clock_seq_hi_and_reserved
       --      |     |   +------------------ time_hi_and_version
       --      |     +---------------------- time_mid
       --      +---------------------------- time_low
       -- See https://datatracker.ietf.org/doc/html/rfc4122#section-4.4
2
  • I am surprised this is so underrated given how simple it is in comparison to all other solutions. Am I missing any obvious issue with this solution?
    – ixi
    Commented Mar 20 at 12:42
  • Perfect! Just wrap it into a function for easy maintenance.
    – MMJ
    Commented May 7 at 17:31

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