For a web page that exists, but for which a user that does not have sufficient privileges, (they are not logged in or do not belong to the proper user group), what is the proper HTTP response to serve? 401? 403? Something else? What I've read on each so far isn't very clear on the difference between the two. What use cases are appropriate for each response?

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    401 'Unauthorized' should be 401 'Unauthenticated', problem solved ! – Christophe Roussy May 17 '16 at 12:33
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    I don't remember how many times me and my colleagues have come back to stackoverflow for this question. Maybe HTTP standards should consider modifying the names or descriptions for 401 and 403. – neurite Feb 4 '17 at 1:14
  • In fact, I am getting a different version of this error. like "os_authType was 'any' and an invalid cookie was sent". So unable to figure out how to solve that. Googled a lot of time , got reasons but didn't get a solution. – Sandeep Anand Feb 12 at 13:59
  • @Qwerty no, the new RFC7231 obsoletes RFC2616. 403 has a different meaning now. – fishbone Aug 1 at 13:15
  • @fishbone Thank you, I will delete my obsolete comment. – Qwerty Aug 2 at 8:24

14 Answers 14

up vote 3060 down vote accepted

A clear explanation from Daniel Irvine:

There's a problem with 401 Unauthorized, the HTTP status code for authentication errors. And that’s just it: it’s for authentication, not authorization. Receiving a 401 response is the server telling you, “you aren’t authenticated–either not authenticated at all or authenticated incorrectly–but please reauthenticate and try again.” To help you out, it will always include a WWW-Authenticate header that describes how to authenticate.

This is a response generally returned by your web server, not your web application.

It’s also something very temporary; the server is asking you to try again.

So, for authorization I use the 403 Forbidden response. It’s permanent, it’s tied to my application logic, and it’s a more concrete response than a 401.

Receiving a 403 response is the server telling you, “I’m sorry. I know who you are–I believe who you say you are–but you just don’t have permission to access this resource. Maybe if you ask the system administrator nicely, you’ll get permission. But please don’t bother me again until your predicament changes.”

In summary, a 401 Unauthorized response should be used for missing or bad authentication, and a 403 Forbidden response should be used afterwards, when the user is authenticated but isn’t authorized to perform the requested operation on the given resource.

Another nice pictorial format of how http status codes should be used.

  • 30
    The default IIS 403 message is "This is a generic 403 error and means the authenticated user is not authorized to view the page", which would seem to agree. – Ben Challenor Sep 16 '11 at 13:19
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    @JPReddy Your answer is correct. However, I would expect that 401 to be named "Unauthenticated" and 403 to be named "Unauthorized". It is very confusing that 401, which has to do with Authentication, has the format accompanying text "Unauthorized"....Unless I am not good in English (which is quite a possibility). – p.matsinopoulos Jun 20 '12 at 21:48
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    @ZaidMasud, according to RFC this interpretation is not correct. Cumbayah's answer got it right. 401 means "you're missing the right authorization". It implies "if you want you might try to authenticate yourself". So both a client who didn't authenticate itself correctly and a properly authenticated client missing the authorization will get a 401. 403 means "I won't answer to this, whoever you are". RFC states clearly thath "authorization will not help" in the case of 403. – Davide R. Nov 24 '12 at 10:38
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    401 is Authentication error, 403 is Authorization error. Simple as that. – Shahriyar Imanov Mar 25 '13 at 14:09
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    You left out "Well that’s my view on it anyway :)" when copying from his blog post and unfortunately his view is wrong. As others have stated 403 means that you can't access the resource regardless of who you are authenticated as. I typically use this status code for resources that are locked down by IP address ranges or files in my webroot that I don't want direct access to (i.e. a script must serve them). – Kyle May 9 '13 at 13:20

See RFC2616:

401 Unauthorized:

If the request already included Authorization credentials, then the 401 response indicates that authorization has been refused for those credentials.

403 Forbidden:

The server understood the request, but is refusing to fulfill it.

Update

From your use case, it appears that the user is not authenticated. I would return 401.


Edit: RFC2616 is obsolete, see RFC7231 and RFC7235.

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    Thanks, that helped clarify it for me. I'm using both - the 401 for unauthenticated users, the 403 for authenticated users with insufficient permissions. – VirtuosiMedia Jul 21 '10 at 7:51
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    I didn't downvote but I find this answer quite misleading. 403 forbidden is more appropriately used in content that will never be served (like .config files in asp.net). its either that or a 404. imho, it wouldn't be appropriate to return 403 for something that can be accessed but you just didn't have the right credentials. my solution would be to give an access denied message with a way to change credentials. that or a 401. – Mel Dec 22 '11 at 5:07
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    "The response MUST include a WWW-Authenticate header field (section 14.47) containing a challenge applicable to the requested resource." It would seem that if you don't want to use HTTP-style authentication, a 401 response code is not appropriate. – Brilliand Mar 20 '12 at 1:42
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    I'll back Billiand here. The statement is "If the request already included Authorization credentials". That means if this is a response from a request which provided the credential (e.g. the response from a RFC2617 Authentication attempt). It is essentially to allow the server to say, "Bad account/password pair, try again". In the posed question, the user is presumably authenticated but not authorized. 401 is never the appropriate response for those circumstances. – ldrut Feb 5 '13 at 17:20
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    Brilliand is right, 401 is only appropriate for HTTP Authentication. – Juampi May 3 '13 at 15:42

Something the other answers are missing is that it must be understood that Authentication and Authorization in the context of RFC 2616 refers ONLY to the HTTP Authentication protocol of RFC 2617. Authentication by schemes outside of RFC2617 are not supported in HTTP status codes and are not considered when deciding whether to use 401 or 403..

Brief and Terse

Unauthorized indicates that the client is not RFC2617 authenticated and the server is initiating the authentication process. Forbidden indicates either that the client is RFC2617 authenticated and does not have authorization or that the server does not support RFC2617 for the requested resource.

Meaning if you have your own roll-your-own login process and never use HTTP Authentication, 403 is always the proper response and 401 should never be used.

Detailed and In-Depth

From RFC2616

10.4.2 401 Unauthorized

The request requires user authentication. The response MUST include a WWW-Authenticate header field (section 14.47) containing a challenge applicable to the requested resource. The client MAY repeat the request with a suitable Authorization header field (section 14.8).

and

10.4.4 403 Forbidden The server understood the request, but is refusing to fulfill it. Authorization will not help and the request SHOULD NOT be repeated.

The first thing to keep in mind is that "Authentication" and "Authorization" in the context of this document refer specifically to the HTTP Authentication protocols from RFC 2617. They do not refer to any roll-your-own authentication protocols you may have created using login pages, etc. I will use "login" to refer to authentication and authorization by methods other than RFC2617

So the real difference is not what the problem is or even if there is a solution. The difference is what the server expects the client to do next.

401 indicates that the resource can not be provided, but the server is REQUESTING that the client log in through HTTP Authentication and has sent reply headers to initiate the process. Possibly there are authorizations that will permit access to the resource, possibly there are not, but lets give it a try and see what happens.

403 indicates that the resource can not be provided and there is, for the current user, no way to solve this through RFC2617 and no point in trying. This may be because it is known that no level of authentication is sufficient (for instance because of an IP blacklist), but it may be because the user is already authenticated and does not have authority. The RFC2617 model is one-user, one-credentials so the case where the user may have a second set of credentials that could be authorized may be ignored. It neither suggests nor implies that some sort of login page or other non-RFC2617 authentication protocol may or may not help - that is outside the RFC2616 standards and definition.


Edit: RFC2616 is obsolete, see RFC7231 and RFC7235.

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    IMHO, this is by far the best and most accurate answer. – Juampi May 3 '13 at 15:22
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    So what should we do when the user requests a page that requires non-http authentication? Send status code 403? – marcovtwout Mar 25 '14 at 11:00
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    This is the answer that answered my questions on the distinction. – Patrick Apr 2 '14 at 15:48
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    This is important: "if you have your own roll-your-own login process and never use HTTP Authentication, 403 is always the proper response and 401 should never be used." – ggg Dec 31 '14 at 6:25
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    Doesn't RFC7235 provide for "roll-your-own" or alternate auth challenges? Why can't my app's login flow present its challenge in the form of a WWW-Authenticate header? Even if a browser doesn't support it, my React app can... – jchook Oct 11 '16 at 15:53

According to RFC 2616 (HTTP/1.1) 403 is sent when:

The server understood the request, but is refusing to fulfill it. Authorization will not help and the request SHOULD NOT be repeated. If the request method was not HEAD and the server wishes to make public why the request has not been fulfilled, it SHOULD describe the reason for the refusal in the entity. If the server does not wish to make this information available to the client, the status code 404 (Not Found) can be used instead

In other words, if the client CAN get access to the resource by authenticating, 401 should be sent.

  • 4
    And if it's not clear if they can access or not? Say that I have 3 user levels - Public, Members, and Premium Members. Assume that the page is for Premium Members only. A public user is basically unauthenticated and could be in either Members or Premium Members when they log in. For the Member user level, a 403 would seem appropriate. For Premium Members, the 401. However, what do you serve the Public? – VirtuosiMedia Jul 21 '10 at 7:40
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    imho, this is the most accurate answer. it depends on the application but generally, if an authenticated user doesn't have sufficient rights on a resource, you might want to provide a way to change credentials or send a 401. I think 403 is best suited for content that is never served. In asp.net this would mean web.config files *.resx files etc. because no matter which user logs in, these files will NEVER be served so there is no point in trying again. – Mel Dec 22 '11 at 5:01
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    This answer deserves more upvotes. I agree with @Mel. – Camilo Martin Jan 27 '13 at 23:00
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    +1, but an uncertain +1. The logical conclusion is that a 403 should never be returned as either 401 or 404 would be a strictly better response. – CurtainDog Jun 21 '13 at 7:09
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    @Mel I think a file that should not be accessed by the client should be a 404. It's a file that is internal to the system; the outside should not even know it exists. By returning a 403 you are letting the client know it exists, no need to give that information away to hackers. The spec for 403 says An origin server that wishes to "hide" the current existence of a forbidden target resource MAY instead respond with a status code of 404 (Not Found). – Juan Mendes Sep 2 '14 at 20:23
   GET, resource exists ?
    |      |
 NO |      | YES
    v      v
   404     Is authenticated (logged-in) ?
             |              |
          NO |              | YES
             v              v
             401            Can access resource (has permissions) ?
           (or: 404)        |            |
           or 301        NO |            | YES
           redirect         v            v
           to login        403           OK 200, 301, ...

Checks are usually done in this order:

  • 401 if not logged-in or session expired
  • 403 if user does not have permission to access resource
  • 404 if resource does not exist

UNAUTHORIZED: Status code (401) indicating that the request requires authentication, usually this means user needs to be logged-in (session). User/agent unknown by the server. Can repeat with other credentials. NOTE: This is confusing as this should have been named 'unauthenticated' instead of 'unauthorized'. This can also fail happen after login if session expired.

FORBIDDEN: Status code (403) indicating the server understood the request but refused to fulfill it. User/agent known by the server but has insufficient credentials. Repeating request will not work, unless credentials changed, which is very unlikely in a short time span.

NOT FOUND: Status code (404) indicating that the requested resource is not available. User/agent known but server will not reveal anything about the resource, does as if it does not exist. Repeating will not work. This is a special use of 404 (github does it for example).

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  • For example I have logged in and I can access a page but it does not permission enabled for me. Which status code will return? – barteloma Apr 1 '17 at 20:26
  • @bookmarker Loggin in is called authentication, which is the first step. So if you do not have permission after logging in you will get 403 Forbidden (insufficient credentials means you do not have enough permissions). – Christophe Roussy Apr 3 '17 at 8:07
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    Clear, and simple explanation. Just what I need. – Estevez Feb 8 at 8:44

If authenticating as another user would grant access to the requested resource, then 401 Unauthorized should be returned. 403 Forbidden is mostly used when access to the resource is forbidden to everyone or restricted to a given network or allowed only over SSL, whatever as long as it is no related to authentication.

From RFC 7235 (Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP/1.1): Authentication):

3.1. 401 Unauthorized

The 401 (Unauthorized) status code indicates that the request has not been applied because it lacks valid authentication credentials for the target resource. The origin server MUST send a WWW-Authenticate header field (Section 4.4) containing at least one challenge applicable to the target resource. If the request included authentication credentials, then the 401 response indicates that authorization has been refused for those credentials. The client MAY repeat the request with a new or replaced Authorization header field (Section 4.1). If the 401 response contains the same challenge as the prior response, and the user agent has already attempted authentication at least once, then the user agent SHOULD present the enclosed representation to the user, since it usually contains relevant diagnostic information.

And this is from RFC 2616:

10.4.4 403 Forbidden

The server understood the request, but is refusing to fulfill it.
Authorization will not help and the request SHOULD NOT be repeated.
If the request method was not HEAD and the server wishes to make
public why the request has not been fulfilled, it SHOULD describe the reason for the refusal in the entity. If the server does not wish to make this information available to the client, the status code 404
(Not Found) can be used instead.

Edit: RFC 7231 (Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP/1.1): Semantics and Content) changes the meaning of 403:

6.5.3. 403 Forbidden

The 403 (Forbidden) status code indicates that the server understood the request but refuses to authorize it. A server that wishes to make public why the request has been forbidden can describe that reason in the response payload (if any).

If authentication credentials were provided in the request, the
server considers them insufficient to grant access. The client
SHOULD NOT automatically repeat the request with the same
credentials. The client MAY repeat the request with new or different credentials. However, a request might be forbidden for reasons
unrelated to the credentials.

An origin server that wishes to "hide" the current existence of a
forbidden target resource MAY instead respond with a status code of
404 (Not Found).

Thus, a 403 might now mean about anything. Providing new credentials might help... or it might not.

  • 2
    This is interesting. Based on RFC 7231 and RFC 7235, I don't see an obvious distinction between 401 and 403 – Brian Feb 27 '15 at 15:20
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    403 means "I know you but you can't see this resource." There's no reason for confusion. – Michael Blackburn Aug 22 '16 at 16:10
  • "If the request included authentication credentials, then the 401 response indicates that authorization has been refused for those credentials. The client MAY repeat the request with a new or replaced Authorization header field (Section 4.1)." However, then "4.2. The 'Authorization' header field allows a user agent to authenticate itself with an origin server". Looks like in RFC7235 they use the term "authorization" like it was "authentication". In that case, it might seem that an authenticated but not authorized user should not get a 401, but rather 403 – arcuri82 Mar 23 at 8:49

This is an older question, but one option that was never really brought up was to return a 404. From a security perspective, the highest voted answer suffers from a potential information leakage vulnerability. Say, for instance, that the secure web page in question is a system admin page, or perhaps more commonly, is a record in a system that the user doesn't have access to. Ideally you wouldn't want a malicious user to even know that there's a page / record there, let alone that they don't have access. When I'm building something like this, I'll try to record unauthenticate / unauthorized requests in an internal log, but return a 404.

OWASP has some more information about how an attacker could use this type of information as part of an attack.

  • 2
    The use of a 404 has been mentioned in previous answers. You're on point re: information leakage and this should be an important consideration for anyone rolling their own authentication/authorization scheme. +1 for mentioning OWASP. – Dave Watts Mar 10 '15 at 11:53

This question was asked some time ago, but people's thinking moves on.

Section 6.5.3 in this draft (authored by Fielding and Reschke) gives status code 403 a slightly different meaning to the one documented in RFC 2616.

It reflects what happens in authentication & authorization schemes employed by a number of popular web-servers and frameworks.

I've emphasized the bit I think is most salient.

6.5.3. 403 Forbidden

The 403 (Forbidden) status code indicates that the server understood the request but refuses to authorize it. A server that wishes to make public why the request has been forbidden can describe that reason in the response payload (if any).

If authentication credentials were provided in the request, the server considers them insufficient to grant access. The client SHOULD NOT repeat the request with the same credentials. The client MAY repeat the request with new or different credentials. However, a request might be forbidden for reasons unrelated to the credentials.

An origin server that wishes to "hide" the current existence of a forbidden target resource MAY instead respond with a status code of 404 (Not Found).

Whatever convention you use, the important thing is to provide uniformity across your site / API.

  • 1
    The draft was approved and is now RFC 7231. – Vebjorn Ljosa Apr 20 '17 at 12:36

TL;DR

  • 401: A refusal that has to do with authentication
  • 403: A refusal that has NOTHING to do with authentication

Practical Examples

If apache requires authentication (via .htaccess), and you hit Cancel, it will respond with a 401 Authorization Required

If nginx finds a file, but has no access rights (user/group) to read/access it, it will respond with 403 Forbidden

RFC (2616 Section 10)

401 Unauthorized (10.4.2)

Meaning 1: Need to authenticate

The request requires user authentication. ...

Meaning 2: Authentication insufficient

... If the request already included Authorization credentials, then the 401 response indicates that authorization has been refused for those credentials. ...

403 Forbidden (10.4.4)

Meaning: Unrelated to authentication

... Authorization will not help ...

More details:

  • The server understood the request, but is refusing to fulfill it.

  • It SHOULD describe the reason for the refusal in the entity

  • The status code 404 (Not Found) can be used instead

    (If the server wants to keep this information from client)

they are not logged in or do not belong to the proper user group

You have stated two different cases; each case should have a different response:

  1. If they are not logged in at all you should return 401 Unauthorized
  2. If they are logged in but don't belong to the proper user group, you should return 403 Forbidden

Note on the RFC based on comments received to this answer:

If the user is not logged in they are un-authenticated, the HTTP equivalent of which is 401 and is misleadingly called Unauthorized in the RFC. As section 10.4.2 states for 401 Unauthorized:

"The request requires user authentication."

If you're unauthenticated, 401 is the correct response. However if you're unauthorized, in the semantically correct sense, 403 is the correct response.

  • 5
    This is not correct. Refer to RFC and to @Cumbayah's answer. – Davide R. Nov 24 '12 at 10:40
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    @DavideR. the RFC uses authentication and authorization interchangeably. I believe it makes more sense when read with the authentication meaning. – Zaid Masud Nov 25 '12 at 1:59
  • This answer is reversed. Unauthorized is not the same as Un-authenticated. @DavideR is right. Authentication and Authorization are NOT interchangeable – BozoJoe Oct 17 '13 at 20:24
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    2616 should be burned. Several newer RFCs are much clearer that there is a need to differentiate between "I don't know you" and "I know you but you can't access this." There is no legitimate reason to acknowledge the existence of a resource that will never be fulfilled (or not fulfilled via http), which is what the 403-truthers are suggesting. – Michael Blackburn Aug 22 '16 at 16:06

I think it is important to consider that, to a browser, 401 initiates an authentication dialog for the user to enter new credentials, while 403 does not. Browsers think that, if a 401 is returned, then the user should re-authenticate. So 401 stands for invalid authentication while 403 stands for a lack of permission.

Here are some cases under that logic where an error would be returned from authentication or authorization, with important phrases bolded.

  • A resource requires authentication but no credentials were specified.

401: The client should specify credentials.

  • The specified credentials are in an invalid format.

400: That's neither 401 nor 403, as syntax errors should always return 400.

  • The specified credentials reference a user which does not exist.

401: The client should specify valid credentials.

  • The specified credentials are invalid but specify a valid user (or don't specify a user as a specified user is not required).

401: Again, the client should specify valid credentials.

  • The specified credentials have expired.

401: This is practically the same as having invalid credentials in general, so the client should specify valid credentials.

  • The specified credentials are completely valid but do not suffice the particular resource, though it is possible that credentials with more permission could.

403: Specifying valid credentials would not grant access to the resource, as the current credentials are already valid but only do not have permission.

  • The particular resource is inaccessible regardless of credentials.

403: This is regardless of credentials, so specifying valid credentials cannot help.

  • The specified credentials are completely valid but the particular client is blocked from using them.

403: If the client is blocked, specifying new credentials will not do anything.

This is simpler in my head than anywhere here, so:

401: You need HTTP basic auth to see this.

403: You can't see this, and HTTP basic auth won't help.

If the user just needs to log in using you site's standard HTML login form, 401 would not be appropriate because it is specific to HTTP basic auth.

I don't recommend using 403 to deny access to things like /includes, because as far as the web is concerned, those resources don't exist at all and should therefore 404.

This leaves 403 as "you need to be logged in".

In other words, 403 means "this resource requires some form of auth other than HTTP basic auth".

https://www.w3.org/Protocols/rfc2616/rfc2616-sec10.html#sec10.4.2

Given the latest RFC's on the matter (7231 and 7235) the use-case seems quite clear (italics added):

  • 401 is for unauthenticated ("lacks valid authentication"); i.e. 'I don't know who you are, or I don't trust you are who you say you are.'

401 Unauthorized

The 401 (Unauthorized) status code indicates that the request has not been applied because it lacks valid authentication credentials for the target resource. The server generating a 401 response MUST send a WWW-Authenticate header field (Section 4.1) containing at least one challenge applicable to the target resource.

If the request included authentication credentials, then the 401 response indicates that authorization has been refused for those credentials. The user agent MAY repeat the request with a new or replaced Authorization header field (Section 4.2). If the 401 response contains the same challenge as the prior response, and the user agent has already attempted authentication at least once, then the user agent SHOULD present the enclosed representation to the user, since it usually contains relevant diagnostic information.

  • 403 is for unauthorized ("refuses to authorize"); i.e. 'I know who you are, but you don't have permission to access this resource.'

403 Forbidden

The 403 (Forbidden) status code indicates that the server understood the request but refuses to authorize it. A server that wishes to make public why the request has been forbidden can describe that reason in the response payload (if any).

If authentication credentials were provided in the request, the server considers them insufficient to grant access. The client SHOULD NOT automatically repeat the request with the same credentials. The client MAY repeat the request with new or different credentials. However, a request might be forbidden for reasons unrelated to the credentials.

An origin server that wishes to "hide" the current existence of a forbidden target resource MAY instead respond with a status code of 404 (Not Found).

  • 2
    -1; these passages have already been quoted in other answers here, and yours adds nothing new. I'd argue that it's patently not clear what the distinction is; you summarise the two codes as "lacks valid authentication" and "refuses to authorise" but I cannot conceive of any situation in which one of those short descriptions would apply where the other could not be interpreted to apply as well. – Mark Amery Jun 5 at 15:59
  • There are many answers here that cover many RFC's and are edited and updated muddying the waters. I included a link to explain what authenticated is and what authorized is and left off all outdated RFC's so that the application is clear. – cjbarth Jun 5 at 17:17
  • Your edit clarifies your interpretation of the two codes, which seems to match many other people's interpretation. However, I personally believe that interpretation makes little sense. The use of the phrase "If authentication credentials were provided" in the 403 description implies that a 403 can be appropriate even if no credentials were provided - i.e. the "unauthenticated" case. Meanwhile, to me the most natural interpretation of the phrase "for the target resource" being included in the 401 description is that a 401 can be used for a user who is authenticated but not authorized. – Mark Amery Jun 6 at 11:36

In the case of 401 vs 403, this has been answered many times. This is essentially a 'HTTP request environment' debate, not an 'application' debate.

There seems to be a question on the roll-your-own-login issue (application).

In this case, simply not being logged in is not sufficient to send a 401 or a 403, unless you use HTTP Auth vs a login page (not tied to setting HTTP Auth). It sounds like you may be looking for a "201 Created", with a roll-your-own-login screen present (instead of the requested resource) for the application-level access to a file. This says:

"I heard you, it's here, but try this instead (you are not allowed to see it)"

  • What exactly is being created? – Grant Gryczan Jun 9 at 1:25

protected by Samuel Liew Oct 5 '15 at 9:20

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