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I'm a swift/iOS newbie and I have a problem to solve. I'm trying to get data from Texas Instrument SensorTag 2. To activate a sensor, following the instructions, I have to write a binary string in the configuration bank of my sensor.

I have this snippet of code:

        if SensorTag.validConfigCharacteristic(thisCharacteristic) {
            // Enable Sensor
            let enableByte = SensorTag.getEnableByteFor(thisCharacteristic)
            self.sensorTagPeripheral.writeValue(enableByte, forCharacteristic: thisCharacteristic, type: CBCharacteristicWriteType.WithResponse)
        }

and I write the function to get the value to write. enableByte type is NSData.

class func getEnableByteFor(thisCharacteristic: CBCharacteristic) -> NSData {
        print(thisCharacteristic.UUID)
        var enableValue = 0

        if thisCharacteristic.UUID == MovementConfigUUID {
            enableValue = ...
        } else { // any other activation
            enableValue = 1
        }

        return NSData(bytes: &enableValue, length: sizeof(UInt8))

    }

For every sensor I have to write a 1 if I want to enable the sensor and 0 if I want to disable it, but with the movement sensor I have to write according to this guide 16 bits (2 byte). For my config I have to write a binary value of 0000000001111111, 0x007F. How can I initialize a NSData object with value 0x007F?

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  • By saying hex do you mean an ASCII representation because that is what hex is, a printable representation. Or do you just want to create the data without an intermediate ASCII representation. Also what is the byte order that you need, big or little endian. – zaph Oct 6 '15 at 18:30
1

Try this:

let bytes : [CChar] = [0x0, 0x7F]
let data = NSData(bytes: bytes, length: 2)

NSData(bytes:length:) creates an NSData object from a byte stream. In Objective-C, this byte stream is of type char *. The Swift equivalent is [CChar]. The question (and another answer) use an Int to represent this byte stream. This is wrong and dangerous.

var enableValue = 0 // enableValue is a 64-bit integer
NSData(bytes: &enableValue, length: sizeof(UInt8)) // this trims it to the first 8 bits

It works because x86 uses Little Endian encoding, which puts the least significant byte first. It will fail on PowerPC, which uses Big Endian. ARM uses switchable endianness so it may or may not fail there. When the situation call for exact bit layout, you should not rely on the architecture's endianness:

class func getEnableByteFor(thisCharacteristic: CBCharacteristic) -> NSData {
    print(thisCharacteristic.UUID)
    let enableValue : [CChar]

    if thisCharacteristic.UUID == MovementConfigUUID {
        enableValue = [0x0, 0x7F]
    } else { // any other activation
        enableValue = [0x1]
    }

    return NSData(bytes: enableValue, length: enableValue.count)
}
0
-1

Much shorter solution taking in account byte order:

NSData(bytes: [UInt16(0x007F).bigEndian], length: 2)

Now there is nothing wrong with using [UInt16] as byte stream because UInt16 has bigEndian property that returns the big-endian representation of the integer changing byte order if necessary.

4
  • thank you, now I try to figure how to refactor my code to return the right NSData – Roberto Pezzali Oct 6 '15 at 19:47
  • 1
    @RobertoPezzali If my answer was helpful please consider to upvote and/or accept it. – mixel Oct 6 '15 at 20:01
  • 1
    Do not rely on the architecture's endiannes when you need an exact bit layout – Code Different Oct 6 '15 at 21:15
  • @ZoffDino I updated my answer to match that condition. – mixel Oct 6 '15 at 21:34

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