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I'm having a hard time understanding what is meant by the combination of Exponentiation and everything else (Multiplication, Division, etc) in group 14 of the Javascript precedence.

Source - MDN

Three questions:

  1. What is the meaning of combining the right-to-left and left-to-right associativity in one group?
  2. How can the expression 2 ** 3 * 4 be rephrased according to these rules, and still get the same answer? 4 * 2 ** 3 works...is that what's meant?
  3. When / how is this not equivalent to the seemingly simpler expedient of giving exponentiation higher precedence?
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  • right to left means 2 ** 3 ** 4 = Math.pow(2, Math.pow(3, 4)); Oct 7, 2015 at 4:22

1 Answer 1

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1) 2 ** 3 ** 4, being right-to-left associative, is 2 ** (3 ** 4). 2 / 3 / 4, being left-to-right associative, is (2 / 3) / 4.

2/3) I believe 2 ** 3 * 4 is (2 ** 3) * 4. 2 * 3 ** 4 is 2 * (3 ** 4) (as evaluated by es6fiddle).

This does not follow from the table; but exponentiation should have precedence over multiplication. Mixing left-to-right and right-to-left in one precedence rank is strange. In fact, as far as I could see in ES7 drafts, it is not at all treated grammatically the same way as *, / and %, but as a unary operation (!).

Also note that no engines other than Babel and Traceur have support for ** at the current time, so it is mostly academic at this point. MDN is a wiki, and exponentiation operator was added by a Mozillian; but AFAIK since Mozilla doesn't currently support **, it does not actually document the way Mozilla interprets the language.

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  • Thank you! I somehow failed to grokk that exponentiation was experimental...I guess I internalized it as an essential back in the bad old days -- I think it's in FORTRAN :)
    – NessBird
    Oct 7, 2015 at 4:52
  • Exponentiation is kind of essential; but you have Math.pow. ** is just syntactic sugar.
    – Amadan
    Oct 7, 2015 at 5:34

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