I have two vectors. I want to make a barplot of the first vector (simple enough, right). The twist is that every element of the second vector is the standard deviation for every element of the first vector (which itself is the average of 4 other values). How can I do that?

The vectors in question:

-4.6521175 0.145839723
 1.1744100 0.342278694
-0.2581400 0.003776341
-0.3452675 0.073241199
-2.3823650 0.095008502
 0.5625125 0.021627196

I.e., how can I add the elements of the second column vector as error bars to the corresponding elements in the first column vector?

enter image description here

Note: Before you ask, yes I did search extensively on this site and did a lot of googling, but my problem is a bit more specific, i.e. what I found didn't match what I needed.

up vote 7 down vote accepted

An implementation with geom_bar and geom_errorbar of ggplot2:

library(ggplot2)
ggplot(df, aes(x=row.names(df), y=V1)) +
  geom_bar(stat="identity", fill="grey") +
  geom_errorbar(aes(ymin = V1 - V2, ymax = V1 + V2), width=0.6) +
  theme_classic() 

this results in:

enter image description here

If you want to remove the numbers on the x-axis, you can add:

  theme(axis.title.x=element_blank(),
        axis.text.x=element_blank(),
        axis.ticks.x=element_blank())

to your ggplot code.


Used data:

df <- read.table(text="-4.6521175 0.145839723
 1.1744100 0.342278694
-0.2581400 0.003776341
-0.3452675 0.073241199
-2.3823650 0.095008502
 0.5625125 0.021627196", header=FALSE)

In response to your comment, two possible solution when you want plot such a large number of bars:

1: Only include a selection of the axis-labels:

ggplot(df2, aes(x=as.numeric(row.names(df2)), y=V1)) +
  geom_bar(stat="identity", fill="grey", width=0.7) +
  geom_errorbar(aes(ymin = V1 - V2, ymax = V1 + V2), width=0.5) +
  scale_x_continuous(breaks=c(1,seq(10,200,10)), expand=c(0,0)) +
  theme_classic() +
  theme(axis.text.x=element_text(size = 6, angle = 90, vjust = 0.5))

this gives:

enter image description here

As can be seen, it is not ideal to cram so many bars in a plot. See therefore alternative 2.

2: Create a grouping variable which you can use for creating facets:

df2$id <- rep(letters[1:20], each=10)

ggplot(df2, aes(x=as.numeric(row.names(df2)), y=V1)) +
  geom_bar(stat="identity", fill="grey", width=0.7) +
  geom_errorbar(aes(ymin = V1 - V2, ymax = V1 + V2), width=0.5) +
  scale_x_continuous(breaks=as.numeric(row.names(df2))) +
  facet_wrap(~ id, scales = "free_x") +
  theme_bw() +
  theme(axis.text.x=element_text(angle = 90, vjust = 0.5))

this gives:

enter image description here

Used data for the two last examples:

df2 <- data.frame(V1=sample(df$V1, 200, replace=TRUE),
                  V2=sample(df$V2, 200, replace=TRUE))
  • Many thanks to Jaap and Stephan. What if I were to read in the values from a file (because that's actually where they come from). The file has no headers. I do x=read.table('some.file') and I now need to pass the two vectors in question (x$V1,x$V2) to ggplot. How can I do that? – Stefan Oct 7 '15 at 6:59
  • One last question Jaap, how can I add the vector element number (starting counting from 1) on the X axis? – Stefan Oct 7 '15 at 7:17
  • My hat down to you, my good sir. – Stefan Oct 7 '15 at 7:23
  • 1
    @Stefan in order to decrease the needed space for the numbers, you can use theme(axis.text.x = element_text(size = 6, angle = 90, vjust = 0.5)) – Jaap Oct 7 '15 at 7:56
  • 1
    @Stefan see the update, HTH – Jaap Oct 7 '15 at 9:57

I personally like arrows() best for this kind of graphic:

df <- data.frame(bar = c(-4.6521175, 1.1744100, -0.2581400,  -0.3452675, -2.3823650, 0.5625125),
error = c(0.145839723, 0.342278694, 0.003776341, 0.073241199, 0.095008502, 0.021627196))

foo <- barplot(df$bar,ylim=c(-6,2),border=NA)
arrows(x0=foo,y0=df$bar+df$error,y1=df$bar-df$error,angle=90,code=3,length=0.1)

enter image description here

Two details:

  1. border=NA in barplot() removes the borders around the bars, so you can actually see the error whiskers around the third bar. Since the third error is so small, the whisker lies pretty much on top of the bar border.

  2. I used the length parameter in arrows() to reduce the width of the horizontal whiskers, which is especially relevant if we have larger numbers of bars. The default is length=0.25.

However, note that "dynamite plots" have major disadvantages. You write that your data come from just four raw points for each bar. In such a case it would almost certainly be better to just plot a (jittered) dotplot of your raw data.

  • 2
    That's genius. I never would have thought of angling the heads of an arrow to make it look like an error bar. – thelatemail Oct 7 '15 at 7:00
  • I have to agree, that is brilliant. One has to give credit where credit is due. But is there a way to decrease the width of the arrows? When there's too many data points the arrows overlap with each other. – Stefan Oct 8 '15 at 1:27
  • @Stefan: Good point, that. I edited my answer to include the length parameter in arrows() (and prettify matters using border=NA in barplot()). – Stephan Kolassa Oct 8 '15 at 6:17

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