85

I want to get a return value from Javascript in Android. I can do it with the iPhone, but I can't with Android. I used loadUrl, but it returned void instead of an object. Can anybody help me?

81

Same as Keith but shorter answer

webView.addJavascriptInterface(this, "android");
webView.loadUrl("javascript:android.onData(functionThatReturnsSomething)");

And implement the function

@JavascriptInterface
public void onData(String value) {
   //.. do something with the data
}

Don't forget to remove the onData from proguard list (if you have enabled proguard)

4
  • 1
    can you elaborate on the proguard part? – eugene Jul 10 '14 at 13:51
  • @eugene if you don't know what it is you probably don't use it. Anyway its something to enable which makes reverse engineering your app harder – Kirill Kulakov Jul 10 '14 at 14:08
  • 1
    Thanks. I know I have proguard-project.txt in the project root but no more than that. I'm asking because your solution works but I get SIGSEGV. I am evaluating document.getElementById("my-div").scrollTop to get scroll position from SwipeRefreshLayout::canChildScrollUp(). I suspect it might be due to the call gets called too many times in short period. or proguard which I suspect because I just don't know what it is.. – eugene Jul 11 '14 at 1:31
  • This should be the accepted answer rather than all hacks commented here – Romit Kumar May 20 '19 at 8:23
64

Here's a hack on how you can accomplish it:

Add this Client to your WebView:

final class MyWebChromeClient extends WebChromeClient {
        @Override
        public boolean onJsAlert(WebView view, String url, String message, JsResult result) {
            Log.d("LogTag", message);
            result.confirm();
            return true;
        }
    }

Now in your javascript call do:

webView.loadUrl("javascript:alert(functionThatReturnsSomething)");

Now in the onJsAlert call "message" will contain the returned value.

7
  • 17
    This is an extremely valuable hack; especially when you're building an app where you don't have control over the javascript and have to make do with existing functions. Note you can get the same result without intercepting the JS alerts using the public boolean onConsoleMessage(ConsoleMessage consoleMessage) instead of onJsAlert and then in the javascript call you do webView.loadUrl("javascript:console.log(functionThatReturnsSomething)"); - that way you leave the JS alerts alone. – Mick Byrne Jul 9 '12 at 3:46
  • The solution with WebChromeClient.onConsoleMessage seems to be cleaner but be aware that it does not work with some HTC devices. See this question for more info. – Piotr Jul 13 '12 at 9:29
  • 3
    Any reason using addJavascriptInterface wouldn't be preferable? – Keith Feb 11 '13 at 6:15
  • @Keith: You'd require an object into which javascript writes it results, but as you can't touch the existing javascript in this question and the existing js does not write into such object, the js interface method doesn't help here (that's how I understood it). – Ray Feb 4 '14 at 9:14
  • 1
    @RayKoopa Not necessarily true. Although you may not be able to edit the existing javascript within the target webpage, you can still invoke methods onto the object passed into mWebView.addJavascriptInterface(YourObject mYourObject,String yourNameForObject); by calling the function mWebView.loadUrl("javascript:yourNameForObject.yourSetterMethod(valueToSet)") – Chris - Jr Nov 23 '16 at 15:26
21

Use addJavascriptInterface() to add a Java object to the Javascript environment. Have your Javascript call a method on that Java object to supply its "return value".

4
  • how can i do that in situation like stackoverflow.com/questions/5521191/… – vnshetty Apr 2 '11 at 4:59
  • This doesn't help if your js doesn't write into this object and you can't touch the js. – Ray Feb 4 '14 at 9:14
  • 7
    @PacMani: Use loadUrl("javascript:...") (API Level 1-18) or evaluateJavascript() (API Level 19+) to evaluate your own JavaScript in the context of the currently-loaded Web page. – CommonsWare Feb 4 '14 at 12:34
  • @CommonsWare: Thanks, I got that ;) however, the manager decided that js can be modified over "abusing javascript alerts" (eyeroll), so I got it going with the interface method. – Ray Feb 4 '14 at 12:49
12

Here's what I came up with today. It's thread-safe, reasonably efficient, and allows for synchronous Javascript execution from Java for an Android WebView.

Works in Android 2.2 and up. (Requires commons-lang because I need my code snippets passed to eval() as a Javascript string. You could remove this dependency by wrapping the code not in quotation marks, but in function(){})

First, add this to your Javascript file:

function evalJsForAndroid(evalJs_index, jsString) {
    var evalJs_result = "";
    try {
        evalJs_result = ""+eval(jsString);
    } catch (e) {
        console.log(e);
    }
    androidInterface.processReturnValue(evalJs_index, evalJs_result);
}

Then, add this to your Android activity:

private Handler handler = new Handler();
private final AtomicInteger evalJsIndex = new AtomicInteger(0);
private final Map<Integer, String> jsReturnValues = new HashMap<Integer, String>();
private final Object jsReturnValueLock = new Object();
private WebView webView;

@Override
public void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
    super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);
    webView = (WebView) findViewById(R.id.webView);
    webView.addJavascriptInterface(new MyJavascriptInterface(this), "androidInterface");
}

public String evalJs(final String js) {
    final int index = evalJsIndex.incrementAndGet();
    handler.post(new Runnable() {
        public void run() {
            webView.loadUrl("javascript:evalJsForAndroid(" + index + ", " +
                                    "\"" + StringEscapeUtils.escapeEcmaScript(js) + "\")");
        }
    });
    return waitForJsReturnValue(index, 10000);
}

private String waitForJsReturnValue(int index, int waitMs) {
    long start = System.currentTimeMillis();

    while (true) {
        long elapsed = System.currentTimeMillis() - start;
        if (elapsed > waitMs)
            break;
        synchronized (jsReturnValueLock) {
            String value = jsReturnValues.remove(index);
            if (value != null)
                return value;

            long toWait = waitMs - (System.currentTimeMillis() - start);
            if (toWait > 0)
                try {
                    jsReturnValueLock.wait(toWait);
                } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                    break;
                }
            else
                break;
        }
    }
    Log.e("MyActivity", "Giving up; waited " + (waitMs/1000) + "sec for return value " + index);
    return "";
}

private void processJsReturnValue(int index, String value) {
    synchronized (jsReturnValueLock) {
        jsReturnValues.put(index, value);
        jsReturnValueLock.notifyAll();
    }
}

private static class MyJavascriptInterface {
    private MyActivity activity;

    public MyJavascriptInterface(MyActivity activity) {
        this.activity = activity;
    }

    // this annotation is required in Jelly Bean and later:
    @JavascriptInterface
    public void processReturnValue(int index, String value) {
        activity.processJsReturnValue(index, value);
    }
}
4
  • 2
    Thank you for the above code - I adopted it in my Android project. However, there is a trap in it, resulting from bad Java API design. The line: jsReturnValueLock.wait(waitMs - (System.currentTimeMillis() - start)); The value of wait() function argument may sometimes happen to evaluate to 0. And this means "wait infinitely" - I was getting an occasional "no response" errors. I resolved it by testing for: if (elapsed >= waitMS) break; and not calling again System.currentTimeMillis() below, but using the elapsed value. It would be best to edit and fix the above code. – gregko Mar 30 '13 at 21:01
  • Wow thanks so much! I was seeing that hang too and never figured out where it was coming from. – Keith Apr 1 '13 at 14:06
  • 1
    But if I run evalJS in button.click listener, etc,. waitForJsReturnValue may cause evalJs() to hang up. So webView.loadUrl() inside handler.post() may not have chance to execute because button.click listener didn't returned. – victorwoo Jul 11 '13 at 9:18
  • But how to wrapping the code not in quotation marks, but in function(){}? How to place jsString into {}? – victorwoo Oct 29 '13 at 8:27
7

On API 19+, the best way to do this is to call evaluateJavascript on your WebView:

webView.evaluateJavascript("foo.bar()", new ValueCallback<String>() {
    @Override public void onReceiveValue(String value) {
        // value is the result returned by the Javascript as JSON
    }
});

Related answer with more detail: https://stackoverflow.com/a/20377857

5

The solution that @Felix Khazin suggested works, but there is one key point missing.

The javascript call should be made after the web page in the WebView is loaded. Add this WebViewClient to the WebView, along with the WebChromeClient.

Full Example:

@Override
public void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
    ...
    WebView webView = (WebView) findViewById(R.id.web_view);
    webView.getSettings().setJavaScriptEnabled(true);
    webView.setWebViewClient(new MyWebViewClient());
    webView.setWebChromeClient(new MyWebChromeClient());
    webView.loadUrl("http://example.com");
}

private class MyWebViewClient extends WebViewClient {
    @Override
    public void onPageFinished (WebView view, String url){
        view.loadUrl("javascript:alert(functionThatReturnsSomething())");
    }
    @Override
    public boolean shouldOverrideUrlLoading(WebView view, String url) {
        return false;
    }
}

private class MyWebChromeClient extends WebChromeClient {
@Override
public boolean onJsAlert(WebView view, String url, String message, JsResult result) {
    Log.d("LogTag", message);
        result.confirm();
        return true;
    }
}
3

As an alternative variant that uses a custom scheme to communicate Android native code <-> HTML/JS code. for example MRAID uses this technic[About]

MainActivity

public class MainActivity extends AppCompatActivity {

    @Override
    protected void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
        super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);

        if (Build.VERSION.SDK_INT >= Build.VERSION_CODES.KITKAT) {
            WebView.setWebContentsDebuggingEnabled(true);
        }

        final WebView webview = new CustomWebView(this);
        setContentView(webview);
        webview.loadUrl("file:///android_asset/customPage.html");

        webview.postDelayed(new Runnable() {
            @Override
            public void run() {

                //Android -> JS
                webview.loadUrl("javascript:showToast()");
            }
        }, 1000);
    }
}

CustomWebView

public class CustomWebView extends WebView {
    public CustomWebView(Context context) {
        super(context);

        setup();
    }

    @SuppressLint("SetJavaScriptEnabled")
    private void setup() {
        setWebViewClient(new AdWebViewClient());

        getSettings().setJavaScriptEnabled(true);
    }

    private class AdWebViewClient extends WebViewClient {

        @Override
        public boolean shouldOverrideUrlLoading(WebView view, String url) {

            if (url.startsWith("customschema://")) {
                //parse uri
                Toast.makeText(CustomWebView.this.getContext(), "event was received", Toast.LENGTH_SHORT).show();

                return true;
            }
            return false;
        }

    }
}

customPage.html (located in the assets folded)

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
    <title>JavaScript View</title>

    <script type="text/javascript">
        <!--JS -> Android-->
        function showToast() {
            window.location = "customschema://goto/";
        }
    </script>
</head>

<body>
</body>

</html>
0

You can do it like this:

[Activity(Label = "@string/app_name", Theme = "@style/AppTheme", MainLauncher = true)]
public class MainActivity : AppCompatActivity
{
    public WebView web_view;
    public static TextView textView;

    protected override void OnCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState)
    {
        base.OnCreate(savedInstanceState);
        Xamarin.Essentials.Platform.Init(this, savedInstanceState);

        Window.AddFlags(WindowManagerFlags.Fullscreen);
        Window.ClearFlags(WindowManagerFlags.ForceNotFullscreen);

        // Set our view from the "main" layout resource
        SetContentView (Resource.Layout.main);

        web_view = FindViewById<WebView>(Resource.Id.webView);
        textView = FindViewById<TextView>(Resource.Id.textView);

        web_view.Settings.JavaScriptEnabled = true;
        web_view.SetWebViewClient(new SMOSWebViewClient());
        web_view.LoadUrl("https://stns.egyptair.com");
    }

    public override void OnRequestPermissionsResult(int requestCode, string[] permissions, [GeneratedEnum] Android.Content.PM.Permission[] grantResults)
    {
        Xamarin.Essentials.Platform.OnRequestPermissionsResult(requestCode, permissions, grantResults);

        base.OnRequestPermissionsResult(requestCode, permissions, grantResults);
    }
}

public class SMOSWebViewClient : WebViewClient
{
    public override bool ShouldOverrideUrlLoading(WebView view, IWebResourceRequest request)
    {
        view.LoadUrl(request.Url.ToString());
        return false;
    }

    public override void OnPageFinished(WebView view, string url)
    {
        view.EvaluateJavascript("document.getElementsByClassName('notf')[0].innerHTML;", new JavascriptResult());
    }
}

public class JavascriptResult : Java.Lang.Object, IValueCallback
{
    public string Result;

    public void OnReceiveValue(Java.Lang.Object result)
    {
        string json = ((Java.Lang.String)result).ToString();
        Result = json;
        MainActivity.textView.Text = Result.Replace("\"", string.Empty);
    }
}

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.