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I get this warning saying that tmpnam is dangerous, but I would prefer to use it, since it can be used as is in Windows as well as Linux. I was wondering why it would be considered dangerous (I'm guessing it's because of the potential for misuse rather than it actually not working properly).

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  • Could you add some context? Who is claiming it's dangerous?
    – nmichaels
    Jul 21 '10 at 13:46
  • Is tmpname a variable name, a file name, a source file name or something else entirely? Not all of us have psychic abilities.
    – sbi
    Jul 21 '10 at 13:50
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    @sbi: tmpnam is a Standard C Library function. Jul 21 '10 at 14:13
  • @Nathon I was actually talking about both the gcc and msvc, I was just wondering what the rational for saying it is dangerous is. @sbi I guess I should have mentioned that it was a Standard Lib Function.
    – Cenoc
    Jul 21 '10 at 14:18
  • 5
    If a hacker has your code. He can attach a debugger and pause the program just after your code calls tmpnam() but before you open the file. Then the attacker will modify the file system so he has access to the file then let your code continue. The attacker now has full access to your tmp data. Alternatively if you use tmpfile() you do not open up this vulnerability in the code as it is a lot harder for the attacker to stop the code while it is in the privileged part of the OS. Jul 21 '10 at 16:26
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From tmpnam manpage :

The tmpnam() function generates a different string each time it is called, up to TMP_MAX times. If it is called more than TMP_MAX times, the behavior is implementation defined.

Although tmpnam() generates names that are difficult to guess, it is nevertheless possible that between the time that tmpnam() returns a pathname, and the time that the program opens it, another program might create that pathname using open(2), or create it as a symbolic link. This can lead to security holes. To avoid such possibilities, use the open(2) O_EXCL flag to open the pathname. Or better yet, use mkstemp(3) or tmpfile(3).

Mktemp really create the file, so you are assured it works, whereas tmpnam returns a name, possibly already existing.

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  • 3
    Using mktemp is Unix-only for Windows you need tmpnam_s and _wtmpnam_s. Thus a platform-independent version is not that easy.
    – usr1234567
    Apr 23 '15 at 7:56
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If you want to use the same symbol on multiple platforms, use a macro to define TMPNAM. As long as you pick more secure functions with the same interface, you'll be able to use it on both. You have conditional compilation somewhere in your code anyway, right?

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if you speak about the compiler warning of MSVC:

 These functions are deprecated because more secure versions are available;
 see tmpnam_s, _wtmpnam_s.

(http://msdn.microsoft.com/de-de/library/hs3e7355(VS.80).aspx)

otherwise just read what the manpages say about the drawbacks of this function. it is mostly about a 2nd process creating exactly the same file name as your process just did.

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From the tmpnam(3) manpage:

Although tmpnam() generates names that are difficult to guess, it is nevertheless possible that between the time that tmpnam() returns a pathname, and the time that the program opens it, another program might create that path‐ name using open(2), or create it as a symbolic link. This can lead to security holes. To avoid such possibili‐ ties, use the open(2) O_EXCL flag to open the pathname. Or better yet, use mkstemp(3) or tmpfile(3).

0

The function is dangerous, because you are responsible for allocating a buffer that will be big enough to handle the string that tmpnam() is going to write into that buffer. If you allocate a buffer that is too small, tmpnam() has no way of knowing that, and will overrun the buffer (Causing havoc). tmpnam_s() (MS's secure version) requires you to pass the length of the buffer, so tmpnam_s know when to stop.

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  • 3
    There is a pre-processor constant L_tmpnam which specifies the maximum length the implementation will write (or in a single-threaded program, you can use a NULL pointer in which case it will use a static buffer). Thus it's a problem easily avoided. The dangerous part comes from the possible race condition between creating the file name, and subsequently creating the file itself.
    – janneb
    Jul 21 '10 at 17:08
  • Most security holes are easy to avoid. (Your answer cites an easy way to avoid the problem you describe). THe problem I describe is more likely to happen if you don't follow the rules. (it's also the problem fixed by tmpnam_s(), so it's clearly the problem they were thinking of) Jul 21 '10 at 17:27

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