47
mylist <- list(NULL, NULL, NULL, NULL, NULL, NULL, NULL, NULL, NULL, NULL, 
    123, NULL, 456)

> mylist
[[1]]
NULL

[[2]]
NULL

[[3]]
NULL

[[4]]
NULL

[[5]]
NULL

[[6]]
NULL

[[7]]
NULL

[[8]]
NULL

[[9]]
NULL

[[10]]
NULL

[[11]]
[1] 123

[[12]]
NULL

[[13]]
[1] 456

My list has 13 elements, 11 of which are NULL. I would like to remove them, but preserve the indices of the elements that are nonempty.

mylist2 = mylist[-which(sapply(mylist, is.null))]
> mylist2
[[1]]
[1] 123

[[2]]
[1] 456

This removes the NULL elements just fine, but I don't want the nonempty elements to be reindexed, i.e, I want mylist2 to look something like this, where the indices of the nonempty entries are preserved.

> mylist2
[[11]]
[1] 123

[[13]]
[1] 456
  • Someone may find a way, but I think you are falling into the "Why is it printing that way" trap. Those index numbers are not the names of your list elements. There are no names. Check names(mylist). So they are just helpers showing where in the list the elements are. That's why you're having trouble telling R to return the 11th position of a list with only two elements. You can try naming the the list as the answer below. – candles_and_oranges Oct 7 '15 at 23:49
  • 1
    IMO this answer should be updated to @Hayward-Oblad's purrr solution below. Either list %>% discard(is.null) or list %>% discard(~ length(.x) == 0). – geotheory Dec 6 '19 at 13:43
75

The closest you'll be able to get is to first name the list elements and then remove the NULLs.

names(x) <- seq_along(x)

## Using some higher-order convenience functions
Filter(Negate(is.null), x)
# $`11`
# [1] 123
# 
# $`13`
# [1] 456

# Or, using a slightly more standard R idiom
x[sapply(x, is.null)] <- NULL
x
# $`11`
# [1] 123
# 
# $`13`
# [1] 456
23

There's a function that automatically removes all the null entries of a list, and if the list is named, it maintains the names of the non-null entries.

This function is called compact from the package plyr.

l <- list( NULL, NULL, foo, bar)
names(l) <- c( "one", "two", "three", "four" )

plyr::compact(l)

If you want to preserve the indexes of the non-null entries, you can name the list as it is done in the post before and then compact your list:

names(l) <- seq_along(l)
plyr::compact(l)
  • 9
    For completeness: purrr::compact() seems to do the same job. – Gabi Mar 13 '18 at 0:55
14

Simply use mylist[lengths(mylist) != 0].

Function lengths() was introduced in R 3.2.0 (April 2015).

  • Users stuck with even older R versions can use vapply(mylist, length, 1L), it's ever-so-slightly vaster (and maybe harder to read to the untrained eye) – MichaelChirico Jul 27 '19 at 11:31
9

The purrr package, included in Tidyverse, has elegant and fast functions for working with lists:

require(tidyverse)

# this works
compact(mylist)

# or this
mylist %>% discard(is.null)

# or this
# pipe "my_list" data object into function "keep()", make lambda function inside "keep()" to return TRUE FALSE.
mylist %>% keep( ~ !is.null(.) )

All above options are from Purrr. Output is:

[[1]] 
[1] 123

[[2]] 
[1] 456

Note: compact() was in plyr, but dplyr superseded plyr, and compact() stayed around but moved to purrr. Anyway, all the functions are within the parent package tidyverse.



Here's a link to the Purrr cheat sheet download:

https://rstudio.com/resources/cheatsheets/

Or to view the Purrr cheatsheet directly in a browser:

https://evoldyn.gitlab.io/evomics-2018/ref-sheets/R_purrr.pdf

5

If you want to keep the names you can do

a <- list(NULL, NULL, NULL, NULL, NULL, NULL, NULL, NULL, NULL, NULL, 
          123, NULL, 456)
non_null_names <- which(!sapply(a, is.null))
a <- a[non_null_names]
names(a) <- non_null_names
a

You can then access the elements like so

a[['11']]
num <- 11
a[[as.character(num)]]
a[[as.character(11)]]
a$`11`

You can't get them in the neat [[11]], [[13]] notation, though, because those represent numerical indices.

  • This is the closest to what you want that can actually be done though :) – Felipe Gerard Oct 7 '15 at 23:50
4

Here it is with convenient chaining notation

library(magrittr)

mylist %>%
  setNames(seq_along(.)) %>%
  Filter(. %>% is.null %>% `!`, .)
  • 7
    Filter(Negate(is.null), setNames(L,seq_along(L))) is pretty easy to read. – thelatemail Oct 7 '15 at 23:56
  • Ok, fixed the issue. Negate != ! – bramtayl Oct 8 '15 at 4:27
2

This solution works with nested list as well

rlist::list.clean(myNestedlist ,recursive = T)
1

here's a very simple way to do it using only base R functions:

names(mylist) <- 1:length(mylist)
mylist2 <- mylist[which(!sapply(mylist, is.null))]

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